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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a Forest River Surveyor 245BHS to tow behind my stock '19 p4x we have the trunion e2 WDH, I've done some mods to the original setup (we inherited the WDH from previous owners who towed with a Armada), mainly moved the L brackets up... here are the stats:

Dry Weight
5,204 lbs.
Payload Capacity
2,422 lbs.
Hitch Weight
626 lbs.
Fresh Water Tank Capacity
46.0 gal.

In less than 1mo, we've towed it prob about 2k miles. It did great except for in 40mph+ crosswinds in Wyoming... **** Wyoming winds, seriously. I figure true hitch weight is closer to 700-750 (2x20lbs LP, 1 large battery), as usual we tow as dry as possible and hit the closest water to our camp... yada yada... I figure 2x adults ~300lb, 2 dogs ~80 lbs, expected baby (10/20) carseat, etc ~50lb, generator ~100lbs, occasionally bring dirt bike in truck bed ~200lb (50% of these trips will be sans baby/wife, giving back ~200lb of payload)... we're right around 1500lb payload, with an empty fuel tank, +160lbs of fuel and we're prob slightly ticking over. Trailer has a bicycle/utility rack on the back (300lb stated capacity), I have strapped the generator to it before, although one large bump bent one of the hitch pins. I am thinking of modifying the rack with a piece of plywood over it to decouple it so it can stay on there and not vibrate in the trailer as much and make the mount centered, this won't have much/any effect on hitch weight, but will give back 100lbs of straight payload when we're going out fully loaded.

If you can't tell I put a great amount of thought into the numbers before making this purchase. I was trying to get a trailer under 600lb hitch weight, but when this one popped up with all the features it had, I bailed on a deal for a similar trailer (~550lb hitch weight) and felt like I stole this one. That feeling has changed a little after getting a blowout causing some damage, buying 4 new tires, replacing the battery, and repacking the bearings... But looking at RV trader, we still paid about 3k less than identical models listed there including the $1k we paid for maintenance... Damage is another story.

When we bought the Titan, I never thought we'd so quickly get to the capacity, at the time we were towing a small pop-up. I flirted with the idea of trading to get an XD or 2500 truck, but I would get screwed on trade in and I really love my p4x and 95% of the time the extra capacity would be wasted. In hindsight, waiting until this year with the gas XD would've been the most perfect move, but oh well.
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Build a dedicated rack on the back for the generator, move some of the stuff out of the bed to the rear of the trailer, and you should be good. My 252 RLS Coachman moves around in the wind and when trucks pass. 25' box, 29' tongue to bumper length. Travel dry as long as possible. Hope you didn't go cheap on the trailer tires. They're not called "china bombs" for nothing.
 

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I tow a tandem-axle wakeboat/trailer, and while it doesn't quite push the WDH threshold at between 5500-6000 as trailered with full fuel and gear, it runs about 26.5' total towed length, and stands pretty tall. I get a fair amount of push with semi-trucks, and I get some "wag" in the wind. I'm sure it's nothing like your slab-sided travel trailers, though. I have found having the tongue weight correct, and the relationship of tongue weight to trailer axle weight distribution, is a key to happy towing. When I first started towing the boat, I had a 3" drop hitch on my Titan. Got a lot of bounce at the hitch, and the boat seemed to want to wag me a lot more, and wanted to move around a lot on bumpy roads. Tried my wife's 2" drop hitch (the one we use with her Expedition) and it changed the trailer characteristics on the highway dramatically. I got much better weight distribution across the trailer axles, and lost almost all the bounce at the ball. I had initially thought it would help, but figured I'd be buying a 1" drop for my truck to get it really well-balanced, if the 2" drop improved it any. After towing with the 2", I was absolutely shocked it made such a dramatic difference. Get your tongue weight right and make sure you have weight correctly distributed to your truck and trailer axles, and you'll see a huge difference in towing manners.

And I make it a point never to run a set of trailer tires longer than about 2.5 full summers. At $200 for a set of tires, mounted and balanced, I figure it's cheap insurance against replacing $300 fenders. Trailer tires are only meant for 2-3 season in the summer heat in Alabama, anyway, IMO.
 

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I paid $500 for Goodyears. I plan on some long pulls though. Plus they have a better speed rating.
 

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I'm saying $200, but in reality it's more, out the door. Probably closer to $300, now that I think about it. Still good investment. And those are Carlisle or another reputable brand. I've had a lot of grief out of Goodyear tires in the last couple of decades, and I can't bring myself to own the brand anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Given I had to get tire service on the side of the road and then again in the small town of Jackson, WY (2 tires on the side of the road, 2 tires in Jackson), I had to take what I could get. The ones on the side of the road I think are better than the ones I bought from Big O in Jackson... Anyways, I plan on running them 2-3 years then replacing all 4. I also bought what is the real cheap blowout prevention... TPMS! At least with TPMS, I'll be able to tell when something is wrong with a tire far before its at blowout levels... get it repaired/replaced and never ever end up in the middle of nowhere like I did before.
 
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