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Any vehicle can go over 200k miles. The question is...How much money do you have spend on repairs in that 200k miles to keep it running? When I say repairs I'm not talking normal maintenance like brake pads, tires etc.

nothing so far, other than normal stuff like oil, tires, etc. and it was the same on all my dad's company trucks. all he bought were mazda b2300 and rangers. the 98 single cab 5 speed b2300 i drove had 325k miles when i got hired on base and all we did were oil changes and filters. same with the three rangers we had. all were 4 cylinder 5 speeds and we only did oil and filters and other normal things. great dependable trucks that last a very long time also.

we never had any trouble with trucks other than those colorados he bought last time. every one of those had the exhaust manifold/catalytic converts crack and leak. of course, out of warranty so each had to paid for by company funds
 

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I bet it doesn't hold up as well as a 1996 4 Runner…
Why you say that? All the mechanicals on the current 4runner have been around since 2010. That's the way they work. Instead of rushing into the latest and greatest like most car companies, which comes back to bite them in the ***, Toyota works on perfecting existing designs. This is why they are slower on catching up with everyone else on features.
 

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nothing so far, other than normal stuff like oil, tires, etc. and it was the same on all my dad's company trucks. all he bought were mazda b2300 and rangers. the 98 single cab 5 speed b2300 i drove had 325k miles when i got hired on base and all we did were oil changes and filters. same with the three rangers we had. all were 4 cylinder 5 speeds and we only did oil and filters and other normal things. great dependable trucks that last a very long time also.

we never had any trouble with trucks other than those colorados he bought last time. every one of those had the exhaust manifold/catalytic converts crack and leak. of course, out of warranty so each had to paid for by company funds
Sounds like Ford did something right for a few years. :)
 

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nothing so far, other than normal stuff like oil, tires, etc. and it was the same on all my dad's company trucks. all he bought were mazda b2300 and rangers. the 98 single cab 5 speed b2300 i drove had 325k miles when i got hired on base and all we did were oil changes and filters. same with the three rangers we had. all were 4 cylinder 5 speeds and we only did oil and filters and other normal things. great dependable trucks that last a very long time also.

we never had any trouble with trucks other than those colorados he bought last time. every one of those had the exhaust manifold/catalytic converts crack and leak. of course, out of warranty so each had to paid for by company funds
Funny your story mimics that of my family. Between my family members, we've owned nine Ford Rangers and one Chevy Colorado, among other trucks. Every one of the Rangers ran years without trouble, aside from a recurrent AC problem on the one my mom has right now. My guess is, that's primarily related to age as it's a '97, and the seals/hoses/etc. keep blowing on it and she has to have it checked out, repaired, and recharged. Last time it broke, I told her to have them replace everything except the compressor (it was replaced due to a clutch failure about two months prior) and start with new. She didn't, and dadgum if it didn't blow another o-ring a couple of months later. But the 2.3L 4cyl and 5spd stick are chugging along at close to 200k with all their factory parts except spark plugs and fluids. Every Ranger we've ever had was pretty much like that - a bulletproof little truck which just kept banging along. Even the 3.0L 6cyl Auto truck my brother had last was a good one. Ran it to 180k before he got the bug to have something new and traded it off.

He has the Colorado now (a 2005 model) and he's had pretty good luck with it, too, except for the exhaust manifold. He tossed that in favor of a tubular stainless header and never looked back, once the crack got big enough to be really annoying. He's about to have to put a motor in it, and he did a rebuilt trans swap a year and a half ago. But at that point he had 275k on it, and he's over 310k now. Motor is consuming oil because his PCV passages are clogged. Not a terrible fix but labor intensive (have to pull the top of the motor off, practically) so he's making do until he can buy a remanned long block and swap it out. Just have to add a quart every 1000mi or so.

I can't really complain so far, though. My Titan is at 136k, and I've done tires twice, swapped out the radiator, and a front and rear pinion seal. Otherwise, it's been perfect. Hoping to keep it that way.
 
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Why you say that? All the mechanicals on the current 4runner have been around since 2010. That's the way they work. Instead of rushing into the latest and greatest like most car companies, which comes back to bite them in the ***, Toyota works on perfecting existing designs. This is why they are slower on catching up with everyone else on features.
i think that is a very good system to use for vehicles. keep perfecting what works well and you will build a great dependable vehicle. if everyone did that, life would be great for us. and i think that is why the rangers were such good trucks. they had a 23 year run with basically only minor things changed.
 

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I think it's funny when I read people post about specific brands and models as if it's really some sort of engineering marvel that certain vehicles hold up longer. You guys aren't even discussing the main reason that certain vehicles appear to last longer, which is driver behavior. Everyone that insists "Toyota is the best!" without factoring driver behavior is just blissfully ignorant.

I find the most annoying drivers on the road to be drivers of sedate "appliance" vehicles where the driver is afraid to even approach the speed limit, or accelerate fast enough to even keep up with traffic. Give me a Corvette, Mustang, Hellcat, or any other high strung vehicle, and limit it to acceleration as anemic as a Toyota/Honda/fanboyspecial and watch it last about as long.

I consider myself to be an aggressive driver as I hate driving in a cluster of cars (I don't trust drivers in general, as I can get into near misses daily). For instance, the other day I was driving in the left lane on the highway, and a driver started to drift towards me, crossing the dividing line. I had to lean on the horn, to draw the driver's attention (was busy looking at his cell phone when I passed). I'm sure if I drove my vehicles like an elderly church lady, my vehicles would last forever (I tend to trade in around the 3-4 year mark, but I perform regularly scheduled maintenance).

Lastly, vehicle components are generally made in the same location as manufacturers have relinquished manufacturing of those components mostly to China or other off-shore locations. If you think that there is some special unicorn dust that's used on parts for certain cars, then all I can say is don't stop believing. Just please keep off the main roads if you're going to drive like grandma.
 

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I'm guessing you don't have much understanding of manufacturing quality standards and why certain cars last inordinately longer than others. For cars - think cheap entry level cars, especially - the big driver of quality is cost. It costs more to maintain tolerances which are tighter, as you must maintain equipment at higher standards and/or reject more parts due to quality failures. All of that is cost baked in. Wonder why a 50k mile dodge dart is super cheap on the used market compared to a 50k mile Toyota Corolla? Because the Corolla is likely to run relatively trouble free and at a lower overall cost of ownership for far more miles than the dodge. Just comparing the total ownership cost of the two cars, similarly equipped, from 2015 shows the Corolla to be about 4% less expensive to own, despite being more than 15% higher initial purchase price.

Quality is built in by method, and those who build it in make cars which last a lot longer than those who don't, even correcting for maintenance and upkeep.

And for the record, it's not just Japanese cars/trucks. For years, Ford had excellent quality in their truck platforms (Ranger and F150) and the number of them sold is a good indicator of that quality. I personally ran several well into the multi-hundred-thousand-mile territory with little repair other than routine maintenance. Can't say that about the dodge ram I owned, nor the multiple grand caravans I had as company vehicles, as I did transmissions in more than one Chrysler product (thankfully covered by warranty or the lease company for the corporate vehicles). And I can assure you I've been harder on my personal trucks than any of my company vehicles. I've been very tough on my Titan. My wife's 2004 Expedition was in top condition with 236k on it when I traded it off. Total repair costs over the life of that truck didn't break $2k over 13yrs of ownership, either. I'm 10yrs and only $750 deep in my Titan right now, at 136k.
 
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i think that is a very good system to use for vehicles. keep perfecting what works well and you will build a great dependable vehicle. if everyone did that, life would be great for us. and i think that is why the rangers were such good trucks. they had a 23 year run with basically only minor things changed.
Like I said...The underpinnings on my 2016 4runner are the same as the 2010 4runner. And how reliable Toyota always has been there is no reason my 2016 will be less reliable than a 1996 4runner. Not sure where Kennedy is getting that from.
 

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I think it's funny when I read people post about specific brands and models as if it's really some sort of engineering marvel that certain vehicles hold up longer. You guys aren't even discussing the main reason that certain vehicles appear to last longer, which is driver behavior. Everyone that insists "Toyota is the best!" without factoring driver behavior is just blissfully ignorant.
Toyota is more reliable and lasts longer due to good engineering and their manufacturing and QC processes which is better than anyone elses in the automotive industry. I suggest you do your research on how they do things compared to others.

Driving behavior has very little do with reliability and longevity of a car.
 

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I'm guessing you don't have much understanding of manufacturing quality standards and why certain cars last inordinately longer than others. For cars - think cheap entry level cars, especially - the big driver of quality is cost. It costs more to maintain tolerances which are tighter, as you must maintain equipment at higher standards and/or reject more parts due to quality failures. All of that is cost baked in. Wonder why a 50k mile dodge dart is super cheap on the used market compared to a 50k mile Toyota Corolla? Because the Corolla is likely to run relatively trouble free and at a lower overall cost of ownership for far more miles than the dodge. Just comparing the total ownership cost of the two cars, similarly equipped, from 2015 shows the Corolla to be about 4% less expensive to own, despite being more than 15% higher initial purchase price.

Quality is built in by method, and those who build it in make cars which last a lot longer than those who don't, even correcting for maintenance and upkeep.

And for the record, it's not just Japanese cars/trucks. For years, Ford had excellent quality in their truck platforms (Ranger and F150) and the number of them sold is a good indicator of that quality. I personally ran several well into the multi-hundred-thousand-mile territory with little repair other than routine maintenance. Can't say that about the dodge ram I owned, nor the multiple grand caravans I had as company vehicles, as I did transmissions in more than one Chrysler product (thankfully covered by warranty or the lease company for the corporate vehicles). And I can assure you I've been harder on my personal trucks than any of my company vehicles. I've been very tough on my Titan. My wife's 2004 Expedition was in top condition with 236k on it when I traded it off. Total repair costs over the life of that truck didn't break $2k over 13yrs of ownership, either. I'm 10yrs and only $750 deep in my Titan right now, at 136k.
I actually worked on the assembly line at General Motors, saw the parts country of origin when I worked for their parts distribution plants (mostly the same country for the electrical parts) and even built components for Boeing, so your guess would be mostly incorrect.

Funny that you mentioned a Dart because I knew a guy that owned one. The guy was part weeble-wobble, part Don Juan wanna-be. He treated that dart like crap, redlined the hell out of it, and just subjected it to pretty horrible abuse. He would show up to work with a large slathering of bird crap on the car that would be on the car for months. One time I told him that I was going to wash the bird crap off for him, and it must've shamed him into washing it off because the next day the crap was gone. I suspect that he couldn't get into a Toyota/Honda/etc. because of his less than stellar credit. A good indicator of how someone treats their car is how they treat their credit, so I can see why he had to get the cheaper dart, and why he treated it like crap (I can imagine if he took extra care of his Dart, how people would probably laugh at him). I'm not saying that a driver is going to play 100% into a car's fate, but I've seen too many appliance Toyotas, Hondas, etc. that were driven so gingerly that I can see how some people think that they're bulletproof. All I'm saying is how a driver drives and treats the vehicle will go a long way in how long that car lasts.
 

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Toyota is more reliable and lasts longer due to good engineering and their manufacturing and QC processes which is better than anyone elses in the automotive industry. I suggest you do your research on how they do things compared to others.

Driving behavior has very little do with reliability and longevity of a car.
Like I said, I see Toyota drivers driving their cars like old grandmas. If you drive most cars like that, you'll get decent mileage out of anything. The outliers are cars that are just outright horribly engineered, and those can be found across ALL manufacturers. And, if you need that research, here's a 2020 Toyota Supra, 2020 Toyota Supra Reliability - Consumer Reports it has SEVEN recalls. Of course, it's not the run of the mill Toyota, and begs to be driven fast.
 

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What I mean by quality is, all those parts you saw with country of origin designations were spec'd to a certain spec, with a range of acceptable deviation. Want better parts? Spec a tighter range of deviation from spec. You'll get it. And you'll pay more for it. And when the right parts are properly spec'd, and built with quality (low tolerance for deviation) you get vehicles which last longer. Anecdotal evidence aside, the reason Toyota and Honda cars have a reputation to last longer is because they actually do last longer across the spectrum of drivers. There are just as many numbnuts out there redlining Civics if not more, compared to Darts. And yet the Civic is known to be a much better car with a significantly longer average lifespan. Why? Quality.
 

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If it helps you guys, I have these same discussions with people that hate Android/Windows and insist Apple is vastly superior. Apple is a good appliance if you are just wanting the vanilla experience. Windows and Android are more customizable, and in the process tend to break more. I don't fault Toyota/Honda/etc. for their approach to the market. People are willing to pay a premium for what they think is a "superior" product. Same goes for Apple. I'm ok with the Apple guys thinking that they have something special on their hands, and willing to shell out extra for it. We're all entitled to our opinions.
 
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