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Discussion Starter #1
I just moved up to Reno from Las Vegas so my 4 wheel drive has seen very little action, but now I've been engaging it for the snow up here. I noticed that when I make a tight turn (not fully cranked) in either drive or reverse, it almost feels as if the brakes are coming on because I have to give it some gas just to get it to move. I mainly notice it when parking and reversing out of a parking spot. I figure I should mention that I have a 4" lift with 35x12.5xR18 wheels. You guys are awesome. Thanks.
 

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do you have the 4WD engaged when you do this?

Let me guess, when driving straight its fine, but when turning it's grabbing? Congratulations, your 4WD is working properly. No worries, bro. It's supposed to do that
 

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Yeah, that would be your driveline binding up because you are on a surface with traction. Stop doing that, you're bound to break something. 4WD is not designed for making turns on surfaces that don't allow slippage between the front and rear axles.
 

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@ Call Sign Maverick - I wish that were the case, but I really don't think it is. I have it in 4hi, it is fine while driving straight and while make normal street turns, but when making tight turns (ex - parking) it really comes to a halt. I have to get it to like 3 - 3.5k rmp (maybe more) for it to even budge. Thank again for the super quick response, I barely had time to refresh the page.
 

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So what do you guys recommend if this is the case? Do I turn off 4 wheel drive just to make a tight turn. I really don't want to drive around with 4 wheel drive off with this much snow on the ground when there are only a few dry places (my drive way / parking lots).


Yeah, that would be your driveline binding up because you are on a surface with traction. Stop doing that, you're bound to break something. 4WD is not designed for making turns on surfaces that don't allow slippage between the front and rear axles.
 

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How about have it in 2WD when pulling out of the parking spot, then engage 4wd to drive in? Or just don't turn tightly? Hell, who knows? Take it in to dealership if you don't believe us...they'll tell you same thing. Then they'll void your warranty for having a lift. Enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I believe you guys and thank you for the responses. Like I said earlier, you guys are awesome. There's nothing better than having someone tell you there's no problem when you think there is. I guess I'll just engage 4 wheel drive only when it's necessary. Also, do you have to have the truck in park to switch to 4wd or can you do it on the fly?
 

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on the fly. Watch the display, it will flash and then go solid showing you're in 4wd. A thought, your owners manual also states not to go over 60mph with 4wd high engaged. I'd read that before doing anymore 4wd'ing. You can switch back and forth from 2wd to 4wd high without a problem. 4wd low is a different story.
 

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4wd on the fly, you most likely shouldnt be using 4x4 while driving unless you think your going to get stuck. You should put some weight in the bed and get better at handling it in 2wd.
agreed.:eyebrow:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
4wd on the fly, you most likely shouldnt be using 4x4 while driving unless you think your going to get stuck. You should put some weight in the bed and get better at handling it in 2wd.
Thanks for the recommendations. This is my first 4x4 (again living in Vegas, it wasn't really necessary) so I guess I just never really learned the rules of using 4wd. I think my 2wd handling skills are fine (no accidents, no sliding off roads) I just figured if I have 4wd, why not use it when snow and ice are on the ground.

Thanks again guys. I appreciate your help.
 

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If there is snow and ice on the ground, use 4wd. if you are making a tight turn with snow and ice, keep in 4wd or put in 2wd if you notice the "bucking" of the engine/wheels. if you are making a tight turn on anything with even the slightest bit of traction, put it in 2wd. That is about as easy as I can make it.
 

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When approaching a sharp turn on dry or firm gravel roads always shift into 2wd before entering the turn.....sometimes it won't shift back to 2wd and you will have room to stop and use reverse for a few feet if necessary before 2wd engages.
If you wait to shift from 4wd to 2wd in a curve it's too late.... and if you try backing to engage 2wd this will also bind the drivetrain.
I use 4wd hi and lo ranges every day up and down my long steep gravel driveway with sharp turns and a stream crossing. At the curves I always shift into 2wd....which works about 80% of the time......the other times I have to use reverse for a few feet to engage 2wd.
When the snow is deep enough I leave it in the 4wd mode as long as it doesn't bind on corners.
 

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Yep, 4wd is working fine. My F-150 was awful about it. Pulling out or backing in my boat I run into that a lot on our half mud, half paved boat ramp. When the front wheels catch traction during a turn your 4wd is binding.
 
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