Nissan Titan Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am heading to the beaches off of Cape Cod, Ma this weendend. I am looking for some advice for sand driving, as I have no experience driving in
it. I have driven my atv in sand but thats it.

The park requires the following:

Shovel: Heavy-duty shovel equal to a military folding shovel
Towing Device: Any of the following which are at least 14 feet long:
Tow Strap: 11/2"; Rope: 3/4"; Chain 5/16"; Cable 1/4"
Jack: Standard size (e.g., vehicle manufacturer's jack)
Jack Support Board: Wood: 10" x 12" x 11/2" or Plywood: 10" x 12" x 3/4"
Tire Pressure Gauge: Must register to 5 p.s.i. or lower

Spare Tire: Must meet tire standards outlined below.
Tires: All 5 tires, including the spare tire, must meet or exceed the standards outlined below. These standards are minimum acceptable tire standards.


I am going to bring my aluminum atv ramps just in case too.

They also give the following tire spec:

Rim Diameter Width Profile Example

18” 255 55 or > P255 / 55 R18

I am guessing I will be ok with my stock tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
Need to drop the air pressure for sand driving which will make your TPMS light up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Which park are you going to? I live in MA and am interested in driving on the beach.

I have an 06 LE CC. Looks like I'll need new tires. Mine are 18" but not 255.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
76,460 Posts
you should be fine unless the sand is really deep. i didn't drop my air pressure at all and left it in 4-hi in 3rd, but kept it under 40 per the speed limit.

here's a few pix from my trip:

























enjoy man, it's a lot of fun and sure beats walking....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
Another tip for beach driving, don't drive or let any salt water run up onto your truck. It rust out way bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
Sand gets into EVERYTHING, but if you wait long enough, she'll poot out a pearl.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Most important thing is to air down your tires to 20 - 25 psi. Not always needed but it is the safest thing to avoid getting stuck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Here is a map of the area. The 255 tire size is the minimum allowed on the sand.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I really depends on what type of sand you are driving on...The wet sand in the pictures in the thread can be driven on with most 2wd vehicles....When the sand gets dry and deep is where the problem occurs....couple of things to remember is no sudden stops(if possible) and don't try to take off with the wheels turned...Best thing to remember is unless you have a friend with bigger tires and a good tow rope, don't go into something you don't feel comfortable in...And sand will be EVERYWHERE by the time you leave..."airing down is a good idea also....But once again if you don't feel comfortable with something don't go...Have fun
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Presumably, you are going to the Cape Cod National Seashore? The sand there is pretty loose as it is blown sand from the spring storms.

I was out there earlier this year and there was some way loose sand around Race Point Lighthouse (which is where we stayed for a couple of nights). Other than that, your truck should not have problems. Just keep it in 4Hi and try and keep moving even if you are crawling.

I only air down to 15 psi and not the recommended 12 psi. Mostly because it takes so damn long to air up the tires when you leave. There is a Gulf station on 6A that has an "unapproved" air compressor that runs at about 300-350 psi. Airing up with that thing takes less than 30 sec./tire. Just drive slow on 6A if you decide to use it as your tire pressure will be super low. Otherwise, you may be stuck waiting in the line to use the ones at the Oversand Station. You can easily wait for 30 min. or more on a weekend.

It is basically difficult to get stuck out there now. When the inner dunes were open, that was a whole different story. Getting stuck was pretty easy. Sigh.... In any case, enjoy watching the "educational video" on the Piping Plovers.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
59,065 Posts
Hose down the entire truck when you get back. Pay special attention to the axle seals and pinion seal. The sand is very abrasive. I had a jeep that I took 4 wheeling on our local beaches all the time. I replaced the axle seals almost every year. Twice I had to pull the pinion gear yoke, have it turned down two thousands, and replace the seal. I also had problems with the clutch slave cylinder but thakfully no Titan owner has to deal with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
Just remember to let the truck do all of the work. I see so many vehicles here in Wilmington that just dog the hell out of their gas pedals and just bury them in the sand. Newer 4 wheel drives are design to slow down wheels that spin too fast to allow the all wheels to turn at the same time so don't get all scared if one of your tires start to spin a bit. Just keep a constant pressure on the pedal and you should be able to pull out of anything on your trip.

Just as any FYI - I never let air out of my tires when I got out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
The sand out there is way too loose to drive on fully aired up. You will dig in as soon as you go to turn or stop hard. If driving in a straight line (which is impossible out there) there wouldn't be any problems. I drove for a while there in 2WD with the tires aired down to 15 psi without any problems. It is not the easiest place to drive especially on the pole road where the sand can blow overnight and leave very loose spots where the truck will just sink in.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top