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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So, I'm wondering what is the best modification to **decrease** fuel consumption?


Thanks!
 

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I hear a new exhaust makes you stomp the pedal more, but I think a Supercharger would use the most fuel! :D Or you could just load up your truck with 10,000 lb. That would seriously reduce fuel mileage and increase consumption.
 

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I think a CAI makes you punch the pedal more than exhaust!!!

Go with a CAI!!!
 

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Blackbeauty said:
I hear a new exhaust makes you stomp the pedal more, but I think a Supercharger would use the most fuel! :D Or you could just load up your truck with 10,000 lb. That would seriously reduce fuel mileage and imcrease consumption.

Dont forget that driving in 4wd all the time will help fuel consumption alot as well :upsidedow
 

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bbomar said:
I think a CAI makes you punch the pedal more than exhaust!!!

Go with a CAI!!!
Good point, bbom! I agree!!!!
 

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Seriously, man, this is not an economy vehicle. We can all appreciate your issue with fuel consumption based on gas prices. I can only imagine it's even more expensive in Germany than it is here in the U.S.A. But economy is best achieved with this truck by driving like a Granny. Or NOT driving at all... With the 4WD, you shouldn't expect much better than 17 or 18 MPG no matter what you do to this truck.... It's just physics.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ha ha ha, well, I appriciate all of the replies, I guess I asked for that one! I'm actually pretty impressed with the fuel economy given the conditions I'm driving the truck in. It was just a thought, but I have my answer now. Thanks!
 

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Max out your tow limit and keep a trailer hooked up all the time.
 

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1) Keep it stock.

2) keep your tires aligned and at 38psi. Smaller tires = better mpg

3) Maybe a TBS Throttle body spacer?? I had a tornado and I swear the thing added 1 mpg.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Wiscdave said:
1) Keep it stock.

2) keep your tires aligned and at 38psi. Smaller tires = better mpg

3) Maybe a TBS Throttle body spacer?? I had a tornado and I swear the thing added 1 mpg.

Humm, thanks for the tips.
 

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:huh: Im confused. Are you asking what is the best way to use more gas or less gas? Its worded like you want to use more gas.
 

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Here's a few that will get you some small gains:

Buy your fuel early in the day. It'll be colder coming out of the ground and will expand a bit while you drive.

Keep the engine in good tune; use synthetic oils where possible, their extra slipperiness will help (we all know this anyway).

Find the 'sweet spot' for acceleration by using a fixed RPM to accelerate and then tracking the result. (My trucks' best is 2350.) Don't just think that if you keep the RPMs under a certain level, that'll get you better mileage. You can actually burn more fuel by accelerating slower than the truck's sweet spot. That's because the throttle's open for a longer time and at a greater average opening than it would be if you just accelerated at the best rate then settled into a cruising speed. What I'm saying is there is a certain optimum RPM (hence throttle) in a hydraulically coupled system) to get to speed. This is the one thing that I've found has the biggest impact on gas mileage.

Hope this helps. :cheers:
 

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Steam Guy NAILED it. my trucks personal rpm is around the 2300RPM mark. another tip for more MPG is keep your foot off it! lol. no need going past 3/4 throttle unless you are towing some SERIOUS weight. lol i agree with you steam guy, i think i have logged enough hours on train simulator :computern to opperate my truck steam powered. :jester:

Cheers,
Chris.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Helinut1970 said:
:huh: Im confused. Are you asking what is the best way to use more gas or less gas? Its worded like you want to use more gas.

yes, I know, that is why everyone above you is giving me ****, I worded it wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Steamguy said:
Find the 'sweet spot' for acceleration by using a fixed RPM to accelerate and then tracking the result. (My trucks' best is 2350.) Don't just think that if you keep the RPMs under a certain level, that'll get you better mileage. You can actually burn more fuel by accelerating slower than the truck's sweet spot. That's because the throttle's open for a longer time and at a greater average opening than it would be if you just accelerated at the best rate then settled into a cruising speed. What I'm saying is there is a certain optimum RPM (hence throttle) in a hydraulically coupled system) to get to speed. This is the one thing that I've found has the biggest impact on gas mileage.

Hope this helps. :cheers:
Intresting. . .I always watch my RPM's and try and keep it from downshifting if I'm going up a hill, I try to keep it at a steady increase in RPMs without downshifting. . .I guess this can be called the "sweet spot" right?
 

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Put a shim under the gas pedal then you cant push it down as far. Or trade it in for a 4cyl frontier. I use cruse control on hwy and it seems to help.
 

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SeanVree said:
Intresting. . .I always watch my RPM's and try and keep it from downshifting if I'm going up a hill, I try to keep it at a steady increase in RPMs without downshifting. . .I guess this can be called the "sweet spot" right?
Small hills are one thing, and yes you're right to keep your RPMs steady when going up a light grade, or even let them (and consequently your speed) drop a little. But larger hills are another thing altogether: When you're putting more than the usual power into the system such as when climbing a hill, the trans is going to downshift and lighten the top half of the torque over speed equation required from the engine to get you over the hill. As one old Master-level guy taught me: "You can't get both speed and torque at the same time. You have to choose."

The engine can't put out the necessary horsepower at the lower speed. The engine can't keep up because it's turning too slowly and is at or below the bottom of the torque curve. So when the engine is going too slow, now it's being 'lugged' and is on the verge of entering into all kinds of problems from high loading over low speed. Bearing loads go way up, cooling needs go way up but circulation isn't there because the water pump is engine-driven and therefore RPM-dependent, and so on.

At this point you really need a downshift; and that's what Nissan's done with the system. These downshifts are programmed into certain points along the power/speed curves of the engine to keep everything within the optimum range.

What I'm trying to say here is that the engine is working harder at the lower speed to get you up over the hill. Where you can notice that you're hitting the edge of the curve is when you're going say 45 and hit a fairly steep hill. The transmission will allow the engine to slow down quite a bit (especially if the torque converter's locked) before it downshifts. Let it downshift, then watch how much you're stepping on the gas. You'll notice you'll need less pressure on the gas pedal to keep it going, versus where you were with trying to hold speed in the higher gear. So in this case, by downshifting and having higher RPM, you're actually getting just a tiny bit better fuel economy. Yeah, it's now mostly disappeared because you're calling for power, but you can manage it a bit.

Hope this helps. :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Steamguy said:
At this point you really need a downshift; and that's what Nissan's done with the system. These downshifts are programmed into certain points along the power/speed curves of the engine to keep everything within the optimum range.

What I'm trying to say here is that the engine is working harder at the lower speed to get you up over the hill. Where you can notice that you're hitting the edge of the curve is when you're going say 45 and hit a fairly steep hill. The transmission will allow the engine to slow down quite a bit (especially if the torque converter's locked) before it downshifts. Let it downshift, then watch how much you're stepping on the gas. You'll notice you'll need less pressure on the gas pedal to keep it going, versus where you were with trying to hold speed in the higher gear. So in this case, by downshifting and having higher RPM, you're actually getting just a tiny bit better fuel economy. Yeah, it's now mostly disappeared because you're calling for power, but you can manage it a bit.

Hope this helps. :cheers:
Humm, I've never heard of a "downshift". . .is that like a chip? If not, I hear that chips will also help the engine manage the fuel intake a bit better, true?
 
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