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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hate to bring this issue up again, it seems like there are many threads on this issue, but I am really stuck between these two tires and I haven't been persuaded either way.

I want the 285/70/17's in one of these two tires. I keep my Titan on pavement and take it up in the Rockies during the winter quite frequently, so I am looking for this tire to be solid in heavy snow, ice, and whatever else, winter throws at me. I don't want a separate set of snows for the winter, just the best all season all terrain tire I can get my hands on and from what everyone posts it sounds like these two tires are the big contenders. Are both of these tires rated for heavy snow in this size?

The Bridgestone only comes in the P rated version for this size, whereas the BFG comes in the LT version. Does the P/LT version difference really matter if I don't haul oober loads of stuff and keep it on pavement?

Help?
 

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I can't answer the P vs. LT question, but I know I have had my revos deflated down to 12 psi with the truck bed full in very loose sand and never had any traction or performance issues. In snow they worked very well. I haven't encountered too much ice, so I can't speak to that.

In pure snow/ice situations, I would think the more aggressive BFG pattern would make it superior.
 

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I put BFG AT KO's on several past trucks and loved every set. I live in upstate (very upstate) NY and deal with some nasty weather conditions. My BFG's never let me down. They ride well, are quiet for such an aggressive tire, and if you treat them well wear like iron. I have no experience with the revos, but many on here seem to like them. The biggest advantage with the revos is price. So if money is an issue go with the revo, if it is not go with the BFG. I always felt like I got what I paid for. Good looking, good performing tire.
 

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Just put a set of 285/70/17 BFG T/A ATs on my Titan last week. I love the tire. I have a set on my work Truck (F-150), and had sets on two previous vehicles. I was a Bridgestone Dueler -Revo user before. The BFGs are much better on snow, and have consistently lasted longer than my one set of Bridgestones. Two thumbs up!
 

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At one time, the blackwall version of the BFG AT KO, (a Daimler Chrysler OEM spec.), 56 lbs. version of the LT285/70/17 did not have the severe weather rating ... the mountain/snowflake symbol. The raised white letter version, RWL, of the same size, but 58 lbs. did have it. This might not be true anymore, as I think it was Yellowmantis that said this is no longer true with the LT315/70/17 (GM OEM), which at one time, didn't have the rating either.

One advantage of the Revo is they are only 43 or 44 lbs. vs. the KOs 58 lbs. My OEM Rugged trails were about this weight, and when I went to the approximately 15 lbs. a piece heavier KOs, I lost about 1 mpg.

An advantage of the KO is when you hit rowdy pothole or road debris, you don't even worry about it, same thing when you drive into the dirt to avoid something, and the stiffer sidewalls don't flex nearly as much in higher speed cornering. Their last 1/4 life though is slick on the wet roads, and I had to throw 240 lbs of sand bags in the bed for the first time this year, (I have tried this before, but it is needed this season). I've read the same thing about the Revo though.
 

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do you want a tire that is:

a) more quiet, highway biased w/ excellent ride and that is great in rain and moderate snow.
b) little louder, more all-terrain biased, little rougher but is great in mud and deeper snowslush, but a little skittish on standing-water roads.

that pretty much sums it up!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
So, the Bridgestones are good on wet surfaces and mild snow conditions whereas the BFG's are better in heavier snow and less effective on wet surfaces. This doesn't make my decision any easier. Anyone have any experience with either of these tires on icy roads?

So it seems like I need a Bridgestone All-terrain TA/KO w/ Revo! Hah! Can someone tell me where I can find one.
 

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Check with your local firestone dealer. Or tirerack.com has them as well.

I can't speak directly to the ice questions, but I have driven around in 2WD in pretty deep snow and in packed snow and never had any traction issues. Trust me, I tried. It was tough getting the back end to come around. Going around a turn, if I floored it I could fish tail. As soon as I let off the gas though the tires hooked back up.

BTW, there was no one else on the road. So my stupid actions were intended to hurt no one but me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
BayStateSuks said:
Check with your local firestone dealer. Or tirerack.com has them as well.

I can't speak directly to the ice questions, but I have driven around in 2WD in pretty deep snow and in packed snow and never had any traction issues. Trust me, I tried. It was tough getting the back end to come around. Going around a turn, if I floored it I could fish tail. As soon as I let off the gas though the tires hooked back up.

BTW, there was no one else on the road. So my stupid actions were intended to hurt no one but me.

I assume you are referring to Bridgestones being great in deep snow and packed snow?
 

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I had the AT KO on my truck, good tire, a little loud, and as it got on in miles rode a little rougher. It did well in powder, but terrible in slush and ice, don't ask me why just my experience.

I was in your boat a couple of months ago. I ended up with the new Michelin AT2. It has channels like the Kumhos on my Subaru that move slush and water out. I drove up I70 in a blizzard with 6 inches of snow without putting a tire wrong on the Kumhos. Haven't had any slush in the truck yet, but ran through about 3 inches of standing water after a big storm that would have make the BFG's nervous handling without any problem.

Really I think Goathead is right. Do you want gnarley, or more civilized. And anyway you go there isn't a bad tire out there unless you go for a made in China store brand.
 

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i have the revo's right now and have about 5k on them. i am looking forward to getting some snow. it seems this TITAN is pretty much unstoppable even on the crappy ragged trails, cant wait to see how the revo's do. having said that, we probably wont get half the snow we did last year.....
 

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anyone who says that bridgestone being a lighter tire is an advantage is completely missing the point of an all terrain tire and reason someone would want a set on a truck... bfg tires are heavier because they use multiple steel belts as opposed to a single wrapping. this creates stronger tread, not to mention longevity. they also have triguard protection which is 3 ply polyester carcass. other coompanies use 1 or 2 ply. 3 ply gives much stronger thicker sidewall and under tread support. bfg tires have an insanely thick sidewall, and very strong tread. this is the greatest advantage with an all terrain tire the thicker the sidewall, the better off you are with protection from puncture and dry rot. mpgs etcs shouldnt be a concern when picking a tire unless you intend to only drive on roads and have an all terrain tire soley for looks.. i have bfg a/t kos ( winter rated ) on my k-5 blazer and with 6/32nds left these tires have been on my truck for 5 years / and im going to be breaking 70k on the clock soon. i have a set on my titan too, however only have 3k since mounting them. the bfg's are great tires with no flaw, they work well in sand, great in snow, great in deep water, and WELL ON ICE. best of all, the bfg is extremely agressive tread design with minimal noise in comparison to m/t baja.

you get what you pay for, bottom line. this tire is the stronger, more versatile, longer lasting, and better looking. to spend 700-750 on revos, you will need another set after 30-35k miles. if you buy bfg tires and take good care of them, you will definately see 70k+ spend the money on bfgs once or spend the money on bridgestone duelers 2-3x's
 

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NorCal 4x4 said:
At one time, the blackwall version of the BFG AT KO, (a Daimler Chrysler OEM spec.), 56 lbs. version of the LT285/70/17 did not have the severe weather rating ... the mountain/snowflake symbol. The raised white letter version, RWL, of the same size, but 58 lbs. did have it. This might not be true anymore, as I think it was Yellowmantis that said this is no longer true with the LT315/70/17 (GM OEM), which at one time, didn't have the rating either.
Tirerack.co still has the "Not rated for severe snow" note for the BSW version.
 

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papojengo said:
anyone who says that bridgestone being a lighter tire is an advantage is completely missing the point of an all terrain tire and reason someone would want a set on a truck... bfg tires are heavier because they use multiple steel belts as opposed to a single wrapping. this creates stronger tread, not to mention longevity.
I'm saying lighter weight is an advantage, and I'm not missing the point. I had the BFG AT KO in the Stock Off Road size, LT285/70/17, and I agree they are in a different league than a passenger rated P285/70/17 Bridgestone AT Revo.

But for the off roading the majority of user do, the Bridgestone AT Revo is adequate. And with today's gas prices, 1 mpg difference can add up to some serious $ over the 3 to 5 years of owning the tire.

papojengo said:
they also have triguard protection which is 3 ply polyester carcass. other coompanies use 1 or 2 ply. 3 ply gives much stronger thicker sidewall and under tread support. bfg tires have an insanely thick sidewall, and very strong tread. this is the greatest advantage with an all terrain tire the thicker the sidewall, the better off you are with protection from puncture and dry rot.
They are not the only AT with 3-ply sidewalls, although it is commendable that they have this for their entire size offerings. Some such as Toyo ATs, only have 3-ply sidewalls available in select sizes, and even offer P-rated versions, so the consumer must know what they're picking.


papojengo said:
mpgs etcs shouldnt be a concern when picking a tire unless you intend to only drive on roads and have an all terrain tire soley for looks..
Some of us do not have the luxury, or the time to swap out rims for dedicated tires. I commute on mine, 99% of the time, but I off road too, sometimes harder than others. For me the advantages of a LT tire is worth the gas mileage hit. But some peoples' idea of off roading is slow speed stuff in an environment without anything that will puncture their sidewall. They can get away with a passenger tire like the Revo. MPG is an important advantage of of a lighter tire. This is obvious if you know how to use a calculator.

papojengo said:
i have bfg a/t kos ( winter rated ) on my k-5 blazer and with 6/32nds left these tires have been on my truck for 5 years / and im going to be breaking 70k on the clock soon. i have a set on my titan too, however only have 3k since mounting them. the bfg's are great tires with no flaw, they work well in sand, great in snow, great in deep water, and WELL ON ICE. best of all, the bfg is extremely agressive tread design with minimal noise in comparison to m/t baja.
I love the BFG AT KO, but they do have one flaw, IMO, and I've heard the same about their MT, (don't know about the new KM2), and that is they get very slick in the rain in their last 10K to 15K miles of treadlife. My Titan rear was all over the road even when I had 320 lbs. of sand in the bed. I guess I could have added more sand, but they'll be summer tires, next time I have a set of tires wear out at the beginning of the dry season.

Btw, this is at 35,000 miles. I rotate my tires, never burn off from stop signs, etc., but I drive extremely curvy roads, and it takes a toll. Everyone's situation is different, and 50K or 60k, or even 70K miles is probably normal for people that drive the freeway.

papojengo said:
you get what you pay for, bottom line. this tire is the stronger, more versatile, longer lasting, and better looking. to spend 700-750 on revos, you will need another set after 30-35k miles. if you buy bfg tires and take good care of them, you will definately see 70k+ spend the money on bfgs once or spend the money on bridgestone duelers 2-3x's
If with your driving style/conditions you can get 70K miles on a BFG AT KO, then I think you'd get 50k on a Revo. And, if you are getting 70K out of them, the Revo sounds like a better match for you. j/k Also, as I mention the KO's last 10K-15K miles are useless if you happen to reach that in the wet season.

Btw, here are some pics of my OEM All-Season P-rated Rugged Trails, when they were almost bald ... for some off roading a P-rated tire will work. I wouldn't try too much higher speed off roading with them though, or narrow trails with sharp rocks that could cut the side wall. It all depends on where and how you off road.

Btw, I believe a LT is a better tire for curvy roads, since they have a stiffer sidewall and don't roll under as much as a passenger rated tire.
 

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Personally, I am going the two tire solution. Buying a used set of wheels and mounting a snow/offroad tire for winter, and using the other set of wheels for the other three seasons. Since you are torn, two sets of tires would be your best solution.
 

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dennisuello said:
Another tire to seriously consider is Toyo Open Country AT. They are an LT rated tire, with a thread closer to Revos, then BFGs.
With their P rated ATs they offer a 50,000 mile warranty, and in their LT ATs, (up to/including the 17" diameter), 40,000 miles. In the LT285/70/17 they are only a 2-ply sidewall for both the D and E rated version, according to their spec sheet anyway.

But for the tread starter's, situation, getting the BFG AT KO LT285/70/17, raised white letter, (RWL), version, (with the Severe Weather ... mountain/snowflake symbol), is definitely the way to go.
 

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BFG KOs in this size weigh 58 lbs, Revos weigh 43 lbs. KOs have no treadlife warranty, Revos have 50K warranty. Revos cost $40 less per tire than the KOs, that's $200 less than the KOs for a set of 4. Dude will be driving primarily on the street. BFG tires are known for wearing out quicker on the street than most but the KOs have a deeper tread depth when new so that may be a wash, however others have added the KOs will get slippery on the wet street towards end of life whereas the Revos won't so again the Revos may have an advantage again. Both tires have 2 steel belts but the KOs have beefier sidewalls for better off road durability if you are going to be banging on rock a substantial amount it may be a factor. My Yukon 4x4 has been running the Revos for over 2 years and they are the best overall all terrain tire I've had on a vehicle yet. Better dry/wet/snow/ice handling on road and great traction in the mud. I've had one set of KOs before and they will be my last, unless the Revos are changed or discontinued.
 
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