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Does anyone know of a photo walk through on changing brakes, I have never had to do it before. I'm positive im capable of doing i just dont want to mess anything up and have to spend more money.
 

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I need to change my brakes asap. They suck. Hopefully members here can post up some pics for you. I too would like to see it.
 

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I just did my front and rear. hardest part for me was the last idiot to work on the truck used a big glop of threadlocker on the caliper braket bolts. Had to use a breaker bar over and over to get them out.

But I would switch to a semi-met pad (The hawk pads most people say to use here are Semi-Met). Ceramic are not really supposed to be used on trucks; not sure why nissan did that.
 

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Ceramic are not really supposed to be used on trucks
Can you enlighten me about this? I have never heard that ceramics and trucks don't mix.
 

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Can you enlighten me about this? I have never heard that ceramics and trucks don't mix.

The pros of ceramic pads are they last longer, less dust, and make less noise. But the problem is they do not have metal, or a lot of it, so they store their heat and can’t displace it as quickly. Many ceramic makers now add a little metal to try and help in this area but it still falls short compared to a full semi-met pad. Its why fleet and large truck pads are mostly semi-met carbon mix.
For many this is not a big deal unless you autocross/race or tow/haul a lot of weight. Being the titan is a full size truck that can tow 6-10k a ceramic does not make sense in terms of usage. Ceramic makes more sense when selling as it’s more quiet and less dust, but that’s it IMO.

I had ceramic pads on my Corvette as I never raced it or did anything to crazy with it. My old Mazda Ranger got Semi-Met pads as I carried and towed a lot of weight with it. When I got my Titan I knew of the brake issues with it and got good rotors (not the cheaper house brand either) and a good set of semi-met pads as I know I will be hauling stuff from time to time and want to cover my bases.
 

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The pros of ceramic pads are they last longer, less dust, and make less noise. But the problem is they do not have metal, or a lot of it, so they store their heat and can’t displace it as quickly. Many ceramic makers now add a little metal to try and help in this area but it still falls short compared to a full semi-met pad. Its why fleet and large truck pads are mostly semi-met carbon mix.
For many this is not a big deal unless you autocross/race or tow/haul a lot of weight. Being the titan is a full size truck that can tow 6-10k a ceramic does not make sense in terms of usage. Ceramic makes more sense when selling as it’s more quiet and less dust, but that’s it IMO.

I had ceramic pads on my Corvette as I never raced it or did anything to crazy with it. My old Mazda Ranger got Semi-Met pads as I carried and towed a lot of weight with it. When I got my Titan I knew of the brake issues with it and got good rotors (not the cheaper house brand either) and a good set of semi-met pads as I know I will be hauling stuff from time to time and want to cover my bases.
Thank you very much Marlin. I was unaware of ceramics and heat build up. You learn something every day.
 

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Oh and I forgot. Many “ceramic” pads are not really ceramic but a hybrid pad. When I was a tech and Ceramic just came out they had just about no metal in them at all. But they had major fade issues. So makers started putting in copper metal. The color of the dust changed a little darker but still way better than the average semi-met pad.

Now I see a lot of “ceramic” pads that contain regular iron and in larger quantity. So even though they are listed as a ceramic they are more a half-half pad. These would probably be ok but it’s hard to tell what you are getting till you are there with a stripped down car/truck. Let alone semi-met pads have also got better to where they produce less dust. So for me and when I had my shop I always did semi-met for trucks and mostly ceramic for cars.
 

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Thank you again Marlin. These are quality posts.
 

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The pros of ceramic pads are they last longer, less dust, and make less noise. But the problem is they do not have metal, or a lot of it, so they store their heat and can’t displace it as quickly. Many ceramic makers now add a little metal to try and help in this area but it still falls short compared to a full semi-met pad. Its why fleet and large truck pads are mostly semi-met carbon mix.
For many this is not a big deal unless you autocross/race or tow/haul a lot of weight. Being the titan is a full size truck that can tow 6-10k a ceramic does not make sense in terms of usage. Ceramic makes more sense when selling as it’s more quiet and less dust, but that’s it IMO.

I had ceramic pads on my Corvette as I never raced it or did anything to crazy with it. My old Mazda Ranger got Semi-Met pads as I carried and towed a lot of weight with it. When I got my Titan I knew of the brake issues with it and got good rotors (not the cheaper house brand either) and a good set of semi-met pads as I know I will be hauling stuff from time to time and want to cover my bases.
Well, I'll be a good test case then as I did Wearever ceramic pads and house rotors. I do basically no towing and actually don't even use my brakes that much since I do a lot of highway driving. We'll see how they hold up...
 

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I just did my front and rear. hardest part for me was the last idiot to work on the truck used a big glop of threadlocker on the caliper braket bolts. Had to use a breaker bar over and over to get them out.

But I would switch to a semi-met pad (The hawk pads most people say to use here are Semi-Met). Ceramic are not really supposed to be used on trucks; not sure why nissan did that.
PS: The last idiot might have been the factory. Mine had never been off and there's some kind of yellow thread sealer on those bolts.
 

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Well, I'll be a good test case then as I did Wearever ceramic pads and house rotors. I do basically no towing and actually don't even use my brakes that much since I do a lot of highway driving. We'll see how they hold up...
I had Wearever Thermo Quiet pads on my last Titan and was very happy. They lasted forever and made very little dust. I pull a trailer a lot but it's only about 4,500 lbs and the biggest hills we have around here are ant hills so my brakes have it fairly easy. The info marlin posted was the first I have heard about ceramic pads and heat.
 

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I had Wearever Thermo Quiet pads on my last Titan and was very happy. They lasted forever and made very little dust. I pull a trailer a lot but it's only about 4,500 lbs and the biggest hills we have around here are ant hills so my brakes have it fairly easy. The info marlin posted was the first I have heard about ceramic pads and heat.
That's good to hear because I believe I used the same pads :thumbsup:
 

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PS: The last idiot might have been the factory. Mine had never been off and there's some kind of yellow thread sealer on those bolts.
Mine were the same way, but I bought it used with 50k miles, I think it was the dealer I bought it from though.
 

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Back to the OP - if you have any mechanical abilities at all, changing brakes is one of the easiest jobs you can do on a vehicle.
I had the same fear with the first one I did, but about 20 brake jobs later, I can do them in my sleep.
 

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For me, the hardest part about changing the brakes on my T is getting the tools out. They are easy to replace.

You need to jack up the wheel you are changing the pads on. If you have a good floor jack, you may be able to jack up the entire front or rear lifting both left and front tires at the same time. Do not try to lift one side to do front and back as there is not a good place to position the jack for that and get support for the jack without doing damage to the underside of the truck. Unless you have a lift, do not jack the front and back at the same time, using 2 jacks, as this is not safe.

You need to take the tire off on the wheel you are changing the pads on.

You will need the wrench to remove/replace the retaining bolts (I use a socket and ratchet)

You may need a sturdy screwdriver to help get the caliper with the old pads off, especially if there is a ridge on the rotor. (as long as the ridge is not large, they will not need to be turned or replaced)

You will need a way to push the pistons in on the calipers - I use a C-clamp. I also use the old pad to push on with the C-clamp. not directly on the pistons.

The pistons have to be pressed ALL the way in or the thickness of the new pads will not allow the caliper to go back on the truck.

Just reverse the process to put it back together.

Make sure all bolts and wheel lugs are tight.

My T takes me less than 30 minutes to do both sides of one end of the truck. If I feel like doing the whole job at once, I can change all 4 in about 45 minutes. It is not that hard.

If you want a real challenge, try changing the drum brakes on the rear of a Dodge Caliber.
 

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If you want a real challenge, try changing the drum brakes on the rear of a Dodge Caliber.
I had a Chevy ¾ ton with dual piston drums on the year. Most difficult brakes I have ever worked on.
 
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