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Discussion Starter #1
Put the warning in there as a heads up. This is a hunting/fishing sub forum so I would assume people browsing it would be prepared to see dead fish and animals though. But you always get some whiners everywhere.

Coyotes, brush wolves, prairie wolves, American Jackals, etc.. whatever you want to call them.

Anyways. Coyote populations locally are BOOMING. Lots of folks losing pets, chickens, calves, etc... for those who don’t know, coyotes are pros at killing baby deer and cows. I was told by a game and fish worker that they estimate over half of baby deer that don’t make it to adulthood are killed and eaten by coyotes. Coyotes have always been hunted by people as well as other predatory animals for their fur to survive winter weather. Recent decades, fur has gone out of “fashion” with synthetic materials and such, and these animals are no longer hunted like they were. So their population levels rose dramatically. They’re also not afraid of people like other predatory animals and will scavenge our leftovers. Part of why their natural range has grown with ours.

Anyways...

Back if my 18’ Titan Pro4x.







Didn’t take pictures of all of them. But here are a few. They like to get in and kill a bunch of hens for fun. Trying to get them to stop coming around a few properties.
 

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We have plenty of them here too, I stumbled across a den last month in the woods behind the barn. Left the pups alone. In late summer I have seen a female and 2 pups feeding on fallen pears in the orchard. Have not had the chance to drop any of them yet. They travel in packs here and make the rounds several times a night, always yipping and making a racket. Getting all of the neighbors dogs barking. They killed all of my chickens last fall. Going to mount my russian night scope and sight it in on my Diamondback AR10 .308 to take some big males out. Any hunting strategies you recommend? I have mostly wooded land with a few open fields.
 

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Nice work eliminating some nuisance predators.

I'll be watching this thread as we have a real songdog problem at our deer lease, and it's affecting fawn recruitment to adulthood. We are going to try to set up in the late spring (just before and during fawning time) and remove as many as we can. One of our guys is going to take some trapping lessons and try that route, as well. Some estimates in our area are that 30-40% of fawns are being taken by coyotes prior to reaching adulthood. That's astronomical. Time to eliminate as many of these overgrown mousers as possible.
 

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Doesn't matter if it's the last day of deer season or not, I'll ruin my chances of getting one if I see a coyote. Those things are pests.
 

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They get brave when not hunted. I've lived in same house for 60 years and have always heard them howling about 1/2 mile away on bluff across the river. This winter (they cross ice on river) they have been in my yard howling below bedroom window on several occasions. I guess it's time to sight-in the .243 and put a little fear in them. Also, wolves have been spreading rapidly out of Yellowstone and MT and WY both have hunting seasons now. Seems to me most wildlife has increased in my lifetime probably due to banning of poison. One major exception is grouse and believe this was caused by past Fed farming program that rewarded big operators to plow tens of thousands of acres of grouse habitat and not plant a crop.
 

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First off I’ll say that i have no problem with hunting coyotes.
Some fyi
Source: meateater podcast
Coyotes contain a biomechanical mechanism that makes them reproduce more as their numbers fall due to hunting/trapping. So you can for a short time reduce the numbers buy hunting, but they will recover in a short time period.

Its the humans hunting of the animal that has caused them to expand according to the biologist on the show.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
We have plenty of them here too, I stumbled across a den last month in the woods behind the barn. Left the pups alone. In late summer I have seen a female and 2 pups feeding on fallen pears in the orchard. Have not had the chance to drop any of them yet. They travel in packs here and make the rounds several times a night, always yipping and making a racket. Getting all of the neighbors dogs barking. They killed all of my chickens last fall. Going to mount my russian night scope and sight it in on my Diamondback AR10 .308 to take some big males out. Any hunting strategies you recommend? I have mostly wooded land with a few open fields.
I use a FoxPro electronic call. Make sure they’re legal in your area if you want to try one.

Typically, you want to call in the same direction the wind is blowing while sitting offset from the call. That’s always worked for me. You want to call for a minute or so. Then shut it off. Then bring it back on. I get most of my success on either coyote pup distress sounds or territorial coyote sounds. A motion decoy of some sort works wonders to get their attention.

The big thing is to make sure you’re in a spot that you’ll see them if they come in. It’ll be a lot of trial and error before you find a pattern that works for you.

Try not to miss any if you take a shot. They are smart and will become educated pretty quickly as to what is going on there.

They’re not very hard to hunt once you figure out what works for you. They’re small 20-45lb animals in 99% of the cases. The best cartridges to use will be smaller rifles such as .223, 6.8spc, 7.62x39, .22-250, .243win, etc... you can use bigger if you want but it’s not needed. I’ve never seen a coyote take a step after being hit by a .243win. Shotguns loaded with plated lead BB shot or any size buckshot work great too. I like 3” magnum #4 buckshot. It has 41 pellets in it and gives a lot of power out to 50-60 yards.
 

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First off I’ll say that i have no problem with hunting coyotes.
Some fyi
Source: meateater podcast
Coyotes contain a biomechanical mechanism that makes them reproduce more as their numbers fall due to hunting/trapping. So you can for a short time reduce the numbers buy hunting, but they will recover in a short time period.

Its the humans hunting of the animal that has caused them to expand according to the biologist on the show.
Maybe but I showed you three that ain't killing nuthin' no more. The ranchers whose fields I took them from aren't weeping about it either.
 

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First off I’ll say that i have no problem with hunting coyotes.
Some fyi
Source: meateater podcast
Coyotes contain a biomechanical mechanism that makes them reproduce more as their numbers fall due to hunting/trapping. So you can for a short time reduce the numbers buy hunting, but they will recover in a short time period.

Its the humans hunting of the animal that has caused them to expand according to the biologist on the show.
That biologist is full of crap. There is no biomechanism for living coyotes to know others have been hunted/killed and reproduce more. What may happen is an increase in pup birthing and pup survival due to the temporary reduction in competition for food, but that's not unique to coyotes, as all species will reproduce with higher success (in science speak, that's "have higher fecundity rates") when resources are less stressed due to reduced sharing. Deer follow the same curve, but it's not "due to" hunting. It's due to population dynamics and nutritional levels. This can be seen easily when you compare the fecundity rates of white-tailed deer in Alabama (where nutritional resources are very good) and neighboring Florida (where most of the state has poor nutritional resources due to the sandy, relatively nutrient-poor soil of the coastal plain). Alabama's fecundity rates will increase proportional to hunting pressure, and you can actually leverage this to grow a deer population by taking out up to half the population annually. Why this works is that as nutritional resources per deer increase (due to less competition for these resources) almost all does will twin-fawn, and a significant portion will triplet-fawn, as opposed to the pattern of single-fawning or failed reproduction in nutritionally stressed times (such as when either food is scarce or competition for food is high due to high populations). In Florida, reproductive rates are relatively static and does generally only single-fawn due to nutritional stresses, regardless of hunting pressure or the number of individuals taken out of the population annually.

Coyotes are very smart, and very adaptable. That's the problem. They came to the eastern US after we bridged the Mississippi, and are partly responsible for the decline (and likely eventual extinction) of the Red Wolf populations which used to fill that niche here in the southeastern US. This adaptability has given them a competitive advantage, coupled with the lack of a top-line predator to aid in controlling the population, and they've grown their population numbers significantly. If left unhunted, they would continue to increase in population, and would eventually reach the carrying capacity of the habitat, and populations would fall dramatically at that point, as reaching that carrying capacity would have a highly negative impact on prey populations (ranging from mice to deer sized animals). It's pure population dynamics, and the biologist you reference is an idiot. I've seen the "fission-fusion" arguments about coyote populations, but they are based on a lie. Coyotes don't generally run in packs. They've always been solitary to paired in their social orientation, and "packs" have consisted of an adult pair and their offspring which were too young to disperse. That is changing in the eastern US, however, as they are adapting to tackle bigger prey items as smaller prey is becoming less available due to the increases in population. The bottom line is, coyotes, like feral hogs, reproduce at rates which generally outpace recreational hunting/trapping efforts, and as such, present a much different problem than typical hunting conservation models can regulate.

Human hunting has had no effect on expansion. Expansion has occurred due to several key factors.
First, red wolf hunting in the east left a niche open. Then we bridged the Mississippi and other rivers, making foot travel relatively easy across these previously prohibitive natural structures. Conservation efforts in the 20th century increased populations of prey animals to record levels. Coyotes leveraged these factors to epxand their range and continue to grow their population. As proof of the idiocy of the idea that hunting is causing an increase in coyote populations (and populations would decline were it not for hunting), consider that they coyote population in 1950 in the southeastern US was virtually zero. By default, they weren't hunted (for the same reason we don't hunt elephants and rhinos here in the southeast - there aren't any). As individuals and mating pairs began to migrate eastward, populations began to establish and grow over time. If we had hunted them effectively then, we may have been able to maintain a low population, but even that idea is doubtful, due to their reproductive rates and gestation times.

Don't believe all the crap you hear from so-called biologists who are just trying to become famous and get some TV and Radio airtime and the revenues from them. Think about the number of "professional hunters" who likely couldn't hunt their way out of a wet paper sack if they weren't being spoon fed by outfitters who want to promote their services. It's the same deal with idiots like whomever said that on that podcast.

And in the interest of full disclosure, I am a trained Wildlife Biologist with a degree in Wildlife Science from one of the best wildlife universities in the southeast. While I don't work in the field anymore, what I'm telling you is directly from real biology, and I'm not trying to get you to listen to my advertisers.
 

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Also, while I advocate killing every coyote I see, I take real joy in taking the females. Dropping a male takes a single individual out for the year, and that's easily replaceable. Take out a female, and you remove not just that one individual, but you remove 5-8 individuals (on average) in the first year, and that's only counting the first litter. When you start calculating out the reproductive cost of removing a female and include the losses across multiple years and extended to the as yet unborn female pups which won't arrive, the numbers are encouraging. Best option is to hunt den locations if you can, and take the larger individuals when you have multiple targets, as the smaller ones are likely pups or yearlings.

If you really want to make a difference in populations, trap. One man can take 3-5 coyotes a day, on a good day. One trapper can take a dozen or more, if he has a good trapping area.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
that idiot as you call him, isn't the only one. i've heard about this bio-mech from two other DNR biologist.
It’s a theory. But has little precedence or hard evidence to support it. As stated. The dogs are not telepathic.

The largest data point to support that theory is the fact that was pointed out. When deer numbers are high, they grow slower than when they’re lower. Food is the largest limiter on wild animal population. If there is not enough food, most fawns or pups won’t make it. So the population will only slowly climb. But if there is bountiful food, all of the pups and fawns will make it. The more you kill, the lower the population, the more food there is. It’s a well documented and proven cycle.
 

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that idiot as you call him, isn't the only one. i've heard about this bio-mech from two other DNR biologist.
There are a lot of anti-vaxxers too.
 

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Also, while I advocate killing every coyote I see, I take real joy in taking the females. Dropping a male takes a single individual out for the year, and that's easily replaceable. Take out a female, and you remove not just that one individual, but you remove 5-8 individuals (on average) in the first year, and that's only counting the first litter. When you start calculating out the reproductive cost of removing a female and include the losses across multiple years and extended to the as yet unborn female pups which won't arrive, the numbers are encouraging. Best option is to hunt den locations if you can, and take the larger individuals when you have multiple targets, as the smaller ones are likely pups or yearlings.

If you really want to make a difference in populations, trap. One man can take 3-5 coyotes a day, on a good day. One trapper can take a dozen or more, if he has a good trapping area.
I have to use live traps due to my dogs, what kind of bait do you recommend? Have caught plenty of possums, raccoons, armadillos, even my neighbors lab once:) but never any coyotes.
 

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Look, you take a coyote out of an area, it's not replaced over night. Eventually yes, but go back and take another one. They are not stupid, they prefer to hang out in areas where they are not hunted or threatened.
 

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Kill em all!
 

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Bait is a fluid subject. You want something with a pretty strong odor - which means anything with a nose is likely to find it. My guess is, your live traps are something the yotes (who invariably smell the bait, just like everything else) are wise to, or at least leery enough of not to get in them for the bait. Coyotes are smart. If they see/smell/hear something out of round, they're done. Just keep trying things they might eat (gutpile, peanut butter on crackers, raw meat, chicken trimmings, etc.) and maybe you'll get lucky. My gut says live trapping them is not going to work well, as they're not keen on the cage apparatus. You might investigate other means of trapping, and keep your dogs out of the trap area if you can.
 

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that idiot as you call him, isn't the only one. i've heard about this bio-mech from two other DNR biologist.
Then you have three idiots who are making up stuff to sound smart. The entire use of the term biomechanical process tells me they're just trying to sound smart. Biomechanics is the study of the mechanics of biology, which means it's the study of how things move, the interaction within the musculoskeletal system to perform movement, the fluidynamics (flow characteristics) of blood within the circulatory system, and other mechanical properties which are part of life. Nothing about mechanical properties has anything to do with reproduction, aside from the actual mechanics of the act of coitus, and the fluidynamics of internal fertilization, so the idea that killing coyotes sets off some innate, "Oh, my goodness, there is a shortage of coyotes so I need to reproduce more" biological trigger is pure horse crap. And you can tell those idiots I said so. They're trying to be smart and making fools of themselves.

As I and others have already said, population dynamics is real, and nutrition availability is a driver of fecundity. But that's true for all species, and it's only true that species will increase within a certain bound of population numbers. If Thanos were to snap his finger and knock off half the coyote population, it's likely they would recover within several years, to prior levels, but they wouldn't exceed those levels anything like immediately, and individual fecundity would only increase from an average of 4-7 pups per annual litter to maybe 8-12 pups average, with some very healthy females producing as many as 16-17 pups, potentially. And if Thanos were in a bad mood and decided to up his ratio to maybe 75%, it would take a decade or more to get the population back to current levels, and reproduction wouldn't exceed the averages I just listed. The entire idea that killing coyotes triggers some sort of increase in ovulation by females is unfounded, unsupported, and pure horse crap.
 
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