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Stinking SparkPlugs.co.uk stole our language and imaging ;) Nah, actually, we exchange referrals with them. The owner, Rob, is a great guy and he runs a tight ship. If you live in the UK, please visit his site first as it will likely save you a substantial amount in shipping cost.

If you want the cliff notes version of the differences of iridium plugs between brands, here it is:
Precious metals don't enhance performance. Thinner Electrodes improve ignitability. Precious metals, such as platinum and iridium, allow thin electrode (aka fine tip or fine wire) plugs to last as long, or longer than, a standard plug.

Though warranties vary by manufacturer, plug life is generally around:
30k miles for standard and single platinum plugs
60k-90k miles for single iridium plugs and double platinum plugs
90-120k miles for iridium/platinum plugs

NGK's Iridium IX is Single Iridium, has a 0.6mm center electrode, and sells for around $7-9
Denso's Iridium Power is Single Iridium, has a 0.4mm center electrode, and sells for around $11-13
Scientifically speaking, the smaller electrode size plug should perform better, but rather that extra 0.2mm is worth the extra $ is your call...
 

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After that link and what you posted, I feel better that I changed plugs when I hit 50K Miles. Although Plugs are expensive; it is all relative, when you consider the long life and influence they have on the performance day to day. It's more important my Plugs stay good, than spending on mods. I'm at 81K now, and will stay with the NGK IX from when I hit 100K Miles.
 

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What about DILFR5C11 ? Has anybody ever bought those?
Your plug choice should first and foremost remain relative to the OE plug in your vehicle. If the OE plug is a standard nickel, you have an open book, and, in that case our published dyno results may help with your decision. Standard nickel plugs usually performed well, platinum plugs performed poorly, single iridium plugs usually performed well. Denso's Iridium Power and Pulstar Iridium or Nickel plugs are usually the top contenders. But that's just speaking in terms of power.

What we've found is:
Standard Nickel: your regular old reliable and consistent plugs that are always there for you.
Single Platinum: completely pointless in my opinion, but that's just me
Double platinum: purely for longevity, no proven performance in our dyno testing.
Single Iridium: performance driven, longer life.
Iridium/Platinum: balance between performance and longevity. Performs better than platinum or double platinum, typically not as well as single iridium. But usually lasts twice as long.

Now the day they come out with iridium/iridium is the day we'll no longer be in business :)

When it comes to your OE plug...some vehicle manufacturers test multiple plugs and install what they feel makes the engine run at its best. Some choose based on longevity (usually in "luxury" vehicles). Some pick the cheapest option that will fill a hole and make a spark.

Good rule of thumb when choosing a plug: stick with OE or consider upgrading, NEVER downgrade. In the case of the DILFR series, the manufacturer commissioned NGK to make that specialty plug specifically for that engine. Using a lower grade plug could decrease performance, or, potentially cause engine damage.

So, if your car came with iridium/platinum from the factory, sorry, you're stuck. If it came with anything less, you have options to choose from depending on if you're looking for life or for performance.
 
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