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Discussion Starter #1
Just seeing your thoughts on this but I went on a job interview and they said the reason that I did not get the job was because I did not have manufacturing expierence. The job was for an IT manager at a local rubber seal manufacturer. Do you guys know of any way that I can get that expierence other than the obvious of going and getting a manufacturing job? Thanks.
 

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P's Titan said:
Just my .02

Would'nt ya think you should have some kind of manufacturing experience to work at a manufacturing facility?
Why? He was applying for an IT job, not a job working on the floor of the plant. I can understand why manufacturing experiance might be beneficial, but not a requirement.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
P's Titan said:
Just my .02

Would'nt ya think you should have some kind of manufacturing experience to work at a manufacturing facility?
If I was working in the plant I would say OK, but I was doing IT. I have had jobs working in IT at a car dealer, I know about cars, but I was never asked if I had a knowledge of cars.
 

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It could be that another applicant had that experiance, and that was the deciding factor.
 

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I can see why that might be important. We are an engineering and manufacturing facility. There are so many interlaced technologies and proprietary manufacturing and testing systems, quality tracking and revision management, etc. We would be more comfortable to bring in an IT manager that can grasp manufacturing challenges and effectively look forward to improve the manufacturing process, from an IT perspective, and share experiences of success or failure from another manufacturing facility.

This is not saying you couldn't do that kind of work, but the employer may see it differently. For example, when we hire IT staff, we look for experienced people, yes- but what experience to they bring to us and how well does that blend with our needs? We really don't care about someone's web development skills if our needs are Linux systems management or familarity with Agile and revision control. While the person could be trained, can we find someone that doesn't need as much training?

Your job prior to the interview is to research the company and better understand their operation and processes, understand what exactly they are looking for in a candidate, and effectively demonstrate how you can blend in to their mix of talent.

With that said, it still might not get you the job. I have seen it happen when someone from a company visits another company and comes across a person from their staff that they wish they could clone. So the ad goes out to find that clone. Sometimes, if the interviewee looks and sounds like the clone they are looking for, that person gets the edge.
 

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MuskyHunter said:
I can see why that might be important. We are an engineering and manufacturing facility. There are so many interlaced technologies and proprietary manufacturing and testing systems, quality tracking and revision management, etc. We would be more comfortable to bring in an IT manager that can grasp manufacturing challenges and effectively look forward to improve the manufacturing process, from an IT perspective, and share experiences of success or failure from another manufacturing facility.

This is not saying you couldn't do that kind of work, but the employer may see it differently. For example, when we hire IT staff, we look for experienced people, yes- but what experience to they bring to us and how well does that blend with our needs? We really don't care about someone's web development skills if our needs are Linux systems management or familarity with Agile and revision control. While the person could be trained, can we find someone that doesn't need as much training?

Your job prior to the interview is to research the company and better understand their operation and processes, understand what exactly they are looking for in a candidate, and effectively demonstrate how you can blend in to their mix of talent.

With that said, it still might not get you the job. I have seen it happen when someone from a company visits another company and comes across a person from their staff that they wish they could clone. So the ad goes out to find that clone. Sometimes, if the interviewee looks and sounds like the clone they are looking for, that person gets the edge.
Well-stated.

In that research, I would add that you have to show examples of how your work applies to their work environment.

Do they practice Six Sigma, LEAN Manufacturing, ISO certified, Baldrige Criteria certified, what are their challenges in IT that they face. How will your job network within the company?

If the key was manufacturing experience, you would have to have shown that even though you do not, you have examples of how you are quick to learn and thus avoid the time delay in getting your area operational.

Build a portfolio.
Do your research.
Consider asking the company you applied for how you could get experience that would make you a stronger candidate next time.

Good luck.
 

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rholland said:
It could be that another applicant had that experiance, and that was the deciding factor.
ya, to me it sounds like they were just using it to let you down easy. Not a knock on you or anything, just maybe someone that met all of their requirements better came along.
 

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They may have made other determinations of your character, fit in the organization, etc. and simply used the manufacturing experience as an excuse for not hiring you.

There could be a million reasons you didnt get the job:

-Showed up late to interview
-Didnt show the qualities they wanted during the interview
-Could not explain: gaps in employment/schooling, errors or ommision in application, felony or misdomeanor issues, etc.
-Were c0cky
-Basic mannerisms during interview (how you sit, what you do with hands, eye contact, etc.)

Not saying you have these problems because I dont know you, but these are things I look for when hiring.

www.collegegrad.com has some great interview tips. You have to sell yourself in an interview as a product
 

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Discussion Starter #11
CoeCEO said:
They may have made other determinations of your character, fit in the organization, etc. and simply used the manufacturing experience as an excuse for not hiring you.

There could be a million reasons you didnt get the job:

-Showed up late to interview
-Didnt show the qualities they wanted during the interview
-Could not explain: gaps in employment/schooling, errors or ommision in application, felony or misdomeanor issues, etc.
-Were c0cky
-Basic mannerisms during interview (how you sit, what you do with hands, eye contact, etc.)

Not saying you have these problems because I dont know you, but these are things I look for when hiring.

www.collegegrad.com has some great interview tips. You have to sell yourself in an interview as a product
I would have to disagree... I know that they have not hired someone in this postion, as my friend works for the company. They have IT issues and have been essentially having their product manager handle them, while he has very limited IT expierence, which is where I would come in to play.
 

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Sounds like they really want to hire from within...which is good in most cases, but not so much in yours. However, MuskyHunter makes a very good point, but in my opinion if you can impress and display the ability to mesh your skills as an IT specialist with their needs then I think you would get the job. Although, again what MuskyHunter said may be the perfect scenario for the company, since the job market is competitive and employers as well as potential employees cannot always have everything each desire.

That is why I believe if they were convinced that you could pick up things fast and easily mesh the two worlds, you would get hired. So I tend to believe that they may prefer to hire from within and maybe as a requirement they had to advertise it publicly. They do it in the federal government all the time. From my experience working for the federal government all jobs normally have to be publicly advertised. However, if there is a current or former fed employee that has return rights or career status, sort of like tenure, then they can non-competitively be given the position. But, another twist is that if the job will be a promotion for that employee it has to be competitively advertised again.

Which brings me back to the idea that they may have someone in mind and just gave you that as an excuse or maybe it is like MuskyHunter says. If you feel confident you did well in your interview and you have friend that recommended you, I think it is one of the two.

Personally, I am actually considering the IT field when I leave Alaska. I have a Bachelors of Science in Computer Information Systems that alone should allow me to get in with one of the many federal government organizations. Due to the fact I currently work for the fed government I would be one of those "career" employees so by virtue of being a disabled veteran and from being in the fed civilian system already it’s a leg up. However, as a backup plan I am also pursuing a MBA with Information Security Management concentration. I say all of this because I truly believe it is the total person concept that gets you in. Right now I am a cost estimator, which I don’t like, but before I was an engineering tech in the military. So my experience ranges from automated drafting and surveying to cost estimating to database creation to business admin and management. I like the saying a jack of all trade, a master of none.

You have to show potential employers you have the aptitude to do a multiple of things. Especially with the high production low overhead that rules the market and work places today. It’s a lot better to have (1) manager that can managed both production and IT tasks with an assistant to help, then (2) managers. (1) Person that can do multiple jobs saves them money. I think specializations are going by the wayside in small way, but they are good for consulting, owning a business, and of course the obvious professional arena, i.e. Doctors, Lawyers, Sole Proprietary systems, etc.

Good luck...but if you have not already, try broadening your skill and keep an open mind. For me, I take whatever, from a business, to engineering, to IT. My goal is to one day be business owner or project manager... Sorry for the book, but this was just a very interesting subject.
 

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Sorry you didn't get the job, but what people have posted here is accurate. I think what you asking for is an honest answer from the company, and you are not getting it. The honest answer might be that they simply didn't like you. I am not stating anything negative about who you are as a person, but the reality of getting a job is what kind of impression you left with the interviewers.

When we interview, the candidate will be interviewed by 5 people, which is my IT technical services staff and Director of IT. We then get together and discuss the questions we each asked and the response. We also observe body language, their business culture and experience, and a lot of non-IT qualifications.

From our standpoint, technical knowledge is something that can be learned, but work ethic (organizational skills, communication, sense of urgency etc.) and business sense is more difficult to train or engrain in an individual. If we get technical aptitude, good business background, and a good sense of work ethic, then we found our guy or gal. If the candidate is technically superior to other candidates, but we question their business sense or work ethic, then we will tend to give the nod to the candidate with the better work ethic and sense of business, provided they are easily trainable.

If you are unsure as to what kind of impression you left, I would suggest getting that camcorder out and taping yourself at a table as if you were in an interview. Don't watch that tape until the next day and then ask yourself why or why not you would hire you, based on the content of the tape. If you find things that you do not like about your video, then make changes to your presentation which also include body language, eye contact, and other interpersonal characteristics. This will give you an edge on the next interview.

There is a ton of information available to help you improve your interview skills, but it takes work. You will also have to accept the fact that some companies will simply not like you, period. Use it as a learning experience and find a company that is excited to have you on board. You will go a lot farther in your carreer. Good luck and best wishes.
 

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I am glad I don't work in IT. I can get a job in any state by tomorrow if I want. Employers are hiring anyone with a a&p license regardless of their experience, or attitude. We keep getting new guys that are worthless, but it is almost impossible to replace them.
 

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MuskyHunter said:
From our standpoint, technical knowledge is something that can be learned, but work ethic (organizational skills, communication, sense of urgency etc.) and business sense is more difficult to train or engrain in an individual. If we get technical aptitude, good business background, and a good sense of work ethic, then we found our guy or gal. If the candidate is technically superior to other candidates, but we question their business sense or work ethic, then we will tend to give the nod to the candidate with the better work ethic and sense of business, provided they are easily trainable.
This is an excellent paragraph! I work in IT, my job title is IT Specialist. My only qualifications are a MCP and A+ certs. I manage our local network, do all helpdesk type stuff, and the phone system. I was not hired because of my extreme expertise :upsidedow , but because I had some experience and I can interact well with end users and managers alike, I have a good work history and I get my stuff taken care of in a timely manner.

This is in no way a stab at you, but it is very possible that they just didn't feel like you would mesh with their group.
 

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in future interviews be prepared to deflect or dispel any percieved concerns a hiring company may have regarding your lack of experience or knowledge of their industry. To do this you need to highlight the key skill sets that you have or that an IT Mgr needs to have and that are transferable from industry to industry, skill sets that go with the profession. Every industry is different, and every industry thinks they are different, but they are all the same, know what i mean.
 
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