Nissan Titan Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I try and make it brief......

I have a 2008 crew cab long bed w/ tow package. The maximun trailer tongue load is 930lb's. I realize that this amount includes not only the weight of the trailer hitch itself but also any weight behind the rear axle (at least I think that is right)..... with that my maximum cargo capicity is stated at 1,488lb's. So......let's say I load up the truck and hitch up the trailer WITHOUT a WD system. If when I do I then have reached my 1,488 cargo weight limit but THEN put on a WD system to help distribute some of that weight.....have I then reduced my total cargo weight by using the WD system and if so, by how much? Meaning....can I now throw another cooler or passenger in the truck because I have "freed" up some weight by using the WD system and compared to not using it before???

fyi....I have not done either of these yet....and I know very much the importance of a WD system and will always use one when applicable.

Sorry, tried to be as clear as possible!!! :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
162,653 Posts
Two things:

First make sure you have a W/D hitch that's rated at more than your tongue weight will be. If that's done then your tongue weight concern is behind you.

Second now your tongue weight now simply becomes part of the weight you factor in to the total cargo capacity of the truck. Subtract out your tongue weight from the total capacity and you get the amount that's left for you, your passengers, your fuel and the stuff you'll load in the bed.

I carry my ice chests in the trailer because then I'm only having to figure in a percentage of the weight of the chest into my total capacity as part of the tongue weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Ditto!

-Lab
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Got it....I think! Two things:

1st, on a side note I thought that a full tank of gas was already taken into consideration when looking at the cargo capacity # on the drive side panel (mine being 1,488lb's)??? Meaning I can load up to 1,488lb's with a full tank of gas ALREADY in there....and for me I have the 37 gallon tank (approximately 220 lb's of fuel when full).

2nd, and sorry for this.....I am assuming the only way I will know how much weight is actually being placed on the trucks hitch (with or w/out a WD system) is to go and get it measured....yes???

Finally, I am still not clear on how much weight is actually distributed when using the WD. Example.....500lb's sits on the hitch....then a WD hitch is added....does 100 lb's go to the front axle of the truck.....100lb's to the axle's of the trailer...and now 300 is left on the truck hitch???

Again, sorry for my ignorance but I really am trying to understand.....:ftard: Thanks much as always!!!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
162,653 Posts
There's been discussion of whether the gas is already factored in or not. I'm of the opinion it isn't. :dunno:

All of the weight from the trailer tongue is being placed on, and is always carried by the hitch first and foremost. Because of the hitch's location, being behind the rear axle, it means that the huge majority of that weight is being placed only on the rear axle, to the the point of it actually even unloading the front axle some. That means that with the squat, the front gets lighter. The purpose of the W/D hitch is to "distribute" some of that weight back on to the front axle of the truck through the frame, thus reducing the amount of weight the rear axle is supporting. It's not just the truck that has a max capacity, the rear axle has it's own max capacity. As to how much is being distributed, it's situation specific. Ideally, with a properly set up W/D hitch, you're putting back as much weight on the front axle as you lost. None of the tongue weight is being put back on the trailer's axles using a W/D hitch. The weight of the trailer is what it is.

Edit to add: Yes, the only way to find out your true hitch weight is to put it on a scale. However, unless you're really afraid it's exceedingly high, it's immaterial in so far as the W/D hitch goes. Remember that what's important in the proper set up is how much weight you're putting back on the front. It is important to know for your calculations of the truck's total capacity, though. It can be done with a simple bathroom scale, a cinder block, and a board of a specific length capable of supporting the tongue weigh of the trailer. Google that, and you'll find it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
162,653 Posts
How to determine your tongue weight with a bathroom scale:

(TW) The downward force that is exerted on the hitch ball by the coupler. The tongue weight will vary depending on where the load is positioned in relationship to the trailer axle(s). To measure the tongue weight, use either a commercial scale or a bathroom scale with the coupler at towing height. When using a bathroom scale, use the method shown and multiply the scale reading by 3.


 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top