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Discussion Starter #1
I am comming up for a job transfer at my Employer, and was LEAKED some interview questions from the Manager.

The job requires a CCNA but since I work for the company they stated they will train me...I am a Systems Software Analyst and wanted to move into the Networking team...the position is for a Jr. Network Engineer.

I don't know if anyone can help me answer some of these questions.

I know some of the answers already..but if anyone could elaborate..I would be in your debt.

Here Goes

1. What is the difference between a distance-vector and link-state protocol.

2. What type of routing protocol is OSPF? BGP?

3. What is DHCP and how does it work?

4. What does the default gateway do ?

5. What is the difference between a hub and a switch? Between a switch and a bridge?

6. You have a workstation on part of the network that can ping any other ip address in it's segment, but nothing in the datacenter. What is the first thing you check?
 

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All your answer can be :google:
I'm not being rude but if you put forth the research you will retain the information better than just asking.

You might want to include OSI model.
What does DHCP have to do with networking, thats a system function.
You might want to look up iBGP, eBGP, eiGRP, RIP, RIP2, IS-IS, Static Routes, as these are also routing protocols.
Check on VLANs, Spanning Tree.

What you have and what I included is basic knowledge of a CCNP exam.
 

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"Cheating" to get the answers for knowledge required for your job is setting yourself up to fail. You really need to research what's being asked and understand the fundamentals of each aspect. Simply answering the questions correctly does you no good if you have no idea what it means. :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I understand what your saying..I came from the Development team..and they are totally ware of my Situation, I am willing to work from the group up, the Network Manager is aware of my situation and just gave me some in site as to what I need to know.

I'm not ignorant to Basic Networking..I do have my MCSE, I just wanted to know how you guys would answer these questions.

THanks,

Paul
 

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and dont forget about the ID10T Errors you get all the time. they are very common with CCNA or any computer work in general.

on with the real stuff, if you have a ccna, then you will know all the answers, they were on your test to get the cert. you could read your ccna manual, the one you got to study for the test. or google search for all the answers. dont just study for the LEAKED questions, study for the NON-LEAKED ones aswell. show your employer you know your stuff and they will pay you because of it. otherwise you might hit a ultimate fail and be stuck where you are for another X years.
 

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I'm not ignorant to Basic Networking..I do have my MCSE, I just wanted to know how you guys would answer these questions.
MCSE isn't networking, it's systems design and administration.

1. What is the difference between a distance-vector and link-state protocol.

2. What type of routing protocol is OSPF? BGP?

3. What is DHCP and how does it work?

4. What does the default gateway do ?

5. What is the difference between a hub and a switch? Between a switch and a bridge?

6. You have a workstation on part of the network that can ping any other ip address in it's segment, but nothing in the datacenter. What is the first thing you check?
It's been awhile since my Cisco days but here goes...
1. Distance vector just determines the metric based on shortest path. Link state takes the state of the link (hahaha) to determine the metric. Latency, delay, bandwidth, etc all go into link state. Just the number of hops is distance vector.
2. OSPF- Open shortest path first. This is a link state protocol, used internally. BGP is used externally, that's what's used on the internet.
3. DHCP is Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, hands client addresses from a server- which allows Dynamic addressing of machines versus manual addressing.
4. Default Gateway is the "route here" for external destinations.
5. Hubs re transmit out all ports, switches have tables that know which port the destination exists on. Hubs are dumb, switches are smart.
Bridges connect two dis-similar networks, switches are generally more used for internally within the network.
6. Too many assumptions to make on what it could be. Anyone would have to ask more information about the network itself before answering that question.

All of these- you should know if you're getting into something that requires a CCNA. The internet can help you out on alot of the above terms, but if you can't answer a #6 on your own then you're setting yourself up for failure.
 

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6. You have a workstation on part of the network that can ping any other ip address in it's segment, but nothing in the datacenter. What is the first thing you check?
6. Too many assumptions to make on what it could be. Anyone would have to ask more information about the network itself before answering that question.
First thing to check is the default route. No or bad route = Ping everything on the local subnet and nothing beyond. :cheers:
 

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Layer1 has a real good point. I would start with the answers you received here and then study Google for a little more info. The best way to answer the questions is for you to be able to answer them confidently and not sound like you just read it from a book. TexUs has answered all of the questions you posted. I also agree that if you can't answer number 6 on your own then you will not only disappoint everyone on your team, but yourself.
 

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First thing to check is the default route. No or bad route = Ping everything on the local subnet and nothing beyond. :cheers:
Are you talking in the workstation or router?
The workstation clears the routes (at least in Windows... Again- no specific information in the question leads to me making assumptions) on a reboot.
The router won't be a culprit here because "A workstation" is singular, which means everything else on the segment works.
 

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Are you talking in the workstation or router?
The workstation clears the routes (at least in Windows... Again- no specific information in the question leads to me making assumptions) on a reboot.
The router won't be a culprit here because "A workstation" is singular, which means everything else on the segment works.
You're overthinking it.

If a piece of hardware can only talk to devices on its segment then the first thing to check is the default route. Doesn't matter if the OS is Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, etc, they'll all add a local route for their configured subnet during boot but the default route is something that can be easily overlooked, especially if you're manually configuring the network stack instead of using DHCP.
 

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You're overthinking it.

If a piece of hardware can only talk to devices on its segment then the first thing to check is the default route. Doesn't matter if the OS is Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, etc, they'll all add a local route for their configured subnet during boot but the default route is something that can be easily overlooked, especially if you're manually configuring the network stack instead of using DHCP.
You're making an assumption the network address is correct, the subnetwork is correct...
That's why I'm saying. Absolutely not enough information in that question to make any sort of a "real" solution to.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Guys thank you so much..I am doing alot of reading this weekend..and watching youtube videos..the position is an Internal one, I would be going for a Jr. Network Engineer and didn't blow any smoke at them. I'm a Developer and want to leave my dept. I'm willing to work from the group up..

So Thank you for your responses..I will let you know if I get the job
 

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You're making an assumption the network address is correct, the subnetwork is correct...
That's why I'm saying. Absolutely not enough information in that question to make any sort of a "real" solution to.
Again, you're overthinking it. Re-read the question. It can ping ANY OTHER IP in its segment. It cannot ping anything else. There is enough info in the question to answer "what should be checked first." It doesn't ask you to solve the problem, it asks what should be checked first. The answer is pretty obvious. K.I.S.S.

:cheers:
 

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Again, you're overthinking it. Re-read the question. It can ping ANY OTHER IP in its segment. It cannot ping anything else. There is enough info in the question to answer "what should be checked first." It doesn't ask you to solve the problem, it asks what should be checked first. The answer is pretty obvious. K.I.S.S.

:cheers:
Geek Fight!!! j/k


Hey I was wondering if anybody knows of a good, SHORT, idiots guide to networking. I work with a lot of network engineers and knowing the difference between layer 1, 2, & 3, switches and routers, static vs DHCP etc make the conversations easier... I want to be able to impress them with "wow the finance guy knows what a muxponder is"

any help is appreciated. Oh yeah.... any good ITIL for dummies stuff would be good too.
 

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Geek Fight!!! j/k


Hey I was wondering if anybody knows of a good, SHORT, idiots guide to networking. I work with a lot of network engineers and knowing the difference between layer 1, 2, & 3, switches and routers, static vs DHCP etc make the conversations easier... I want to be able to impress them with "wow the finance guy knows what a muxponder is"

any help is appreciated. Oh yeah.... any good ITIL for dummies stuff would be good too.
As far as an id10t guide to networking... I would start with some CCNA cert books. Just skim through them and you will get a good understanding for a lot of the technologies.

For ITIL... That is a tough one. I had to go through classes to actually get a good understanding of it. I would start with their website http://www.itil-officialsite.com/home/home.asp. From there check your local book store.
 

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Again, you're overthinking it. Re-read the question. It can ping ANY OTHER IP in its segment. It cannot ping anything else. There is enough info in the question to answer "what should be checked first." It doesn't ask you to solve the problem, it asks what should be checked first. The answer is pretty obvious. K.I.S.S.

:cheers:
Over thinking ANY problem can be your worst enemy. KISS is the best way to go at any problem.
 
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