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Discussion Starter #1
So I’m looking for new tires for my 2015 Titan. I’ve looked at so many tires and so many reviews that I’m overloaded. First off, I’m not some dumb girl so don’t treat me as such, I do know a thing or two about trucks...
I am looking for something that is good in the rain (snow in the winter), mainly highway with some gravel/off road use. My truck does not get muddy intentionally (she’s pretty) so I don’t have a need for an aggressive mud tire. But I want something to last as in the last 3 years I’ve put on over 50,000 miles and have been through 2 sets of tires already. I have a tendency to drive a little too fast which doesn’t seem to help. Also, I’m trying to keep my average MPG if not gain more since it’s already low as is.
Oh and I would like to stay under $1000 for all four...

Any help and suggestions would greatly be appreciated. Unless you think I should just buy a new truck since I’ve sadly reached 50,000 miles. LOL
 

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2012 Nissan Titan SV 4x4
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The last set of tires I put on my 2012 were Firestone Destination A/T's. Theyre an all season tire, rated for 50000 miles. These were about $200/each. Im pretty happy with how they've held up to the snow and rain. My driving is very similar to yours - mostly highway, although I drive a fair amount in town and in town road conditions arent great here.

Couple of questions - how often are you rotating? How about alignments? After I bought my Titan in 2015, I went through the first set of tires in about 30k miles, even though they were a 60k tire. Ever since then, I've been particular about keeping up with the rotations and alignments. I also found my outer tie rods were starting to go, so I replaced those as well.

Which tires did you have previously?
 

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Soo... I’m terrible about rotating. It always seems like such a hassle and have been told with Nissans that rotations and alignments are a must. My last set I had rotated once and I know it needs aligned. I planned on getting the alignment when I get the new tires installed. The only 2 sets of tires I’ve had for this truck have been the stock Goodyear’s (same as I had on my 2011 Titan and 2011 Pathfinder which I know do not last) I had them about a year before my inspection last September and they just passed. Thankfully, we had a mild winter so I was able to get to this point with them but they are terrible now and need replaced ASAP. I do have a lot of city and some backroad driving which road conditions

I have been looking at the Firestone’s and see that that have good reviews.

No joke, In the past when I needed new tires I just went out and got a new vehicle but I kinda really like this truck and haven’t had any major issues so far besides normal wear and tear along with the rear end seal that needed replaced.
 

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So I'll say a couple of things. First, if you're not rotating every 5-10k, you're going to eat up tires quickly. Even the best tire, with the longest lifespan, is going to go fast in your scenario. Buy a jack, four stands, and a battery operated impact wrench. Every time you have your oil changed, move the front tires to the rear on the same side, and then move the rears to the opposite front. This will get each tire into each running position over 20k. It will ensure your passenger side tires don't wear out prior to your driver's side, as the passenger rear wears more than the other three. It will also straighten out the feathering you'll get on the front (happens due to turning, and mild misalignments). I've been doing this every oil change on my Titan, and got 42k out of the OEM Ragged Fails (BFG Rugged Trails, which I did not care for) and am about to replace my replacement tires, a set of BFG TA KOs, in the OEM size, at 120k (which means I've put 78k on those tires and have a couple thousand of wear left before I hit the wear bars). Most of my driving has been highway, also (90mi commute to work, round trip - and yes, I know the Titan is not the best commuter vehicle!), which should help with wear, provided you rotate. And that brings me to my second point - get an alignment. Get it when you replace your tires, and if your truck starts to wear the tires funny or pull, get it checked again. This is just as important as oil changes and brakes. Either you "really like this truck" and you maintain it, or your just saying you really like it, and you really don't care about it.

As for what tires, I'd suggest a good all-season street tire designed for pickups or SUVs. Look at the weight of the tire, and find one that is as light as possible, with a high UTQG rating (something over 650). Beyond that, consider something with the "Mountain/Snowflake" symbol, as it's better in snow and such. Get a reputable brand (Firestone, Cooper, Michelen, Bridgstone, et al) and you should be fine. But if you don't maintain it, you're wasting money every time you crank the truck.
 

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The shop I go to sells a really good alignment package. They actually have several, but the base alignment allows you to bring it back within six months to get it re-checked and aligned. I normally take it in at least twice a year to get it checked. A lot of times, the adjustments are minor, but tires are expensive and I want to get my moneys worth.

Ive had some really good luck mechanically with the Titan. Keeping up on the maintenance really allows that to shine, I think. Just like with anything else, you get what you pay for. Im due for tires, probably before it snows again. Ill either get another set of the Firestones or may try the Michelin Defender tire. The reviews on those seem decent also.

If you have the tools, the rotations not too bad to do. Just need jack stands, a jack, and the appropriate sized wrench to loosen and tighten the lug nuts. Depending on where you get the tire, some shops will rotate the tires for the life of the tire as part of the purchase. I would look into that as well.

If you go to a decent shop for the alignment, they'll usually tell you if there are issues with the suspension that you would need to address. If anything comes up, address it. Issues in the suspension will also contribute to tire wear.

Re-reading all of that sounds like it could be a lot, but in my experience, after having a car payment for the last 15 years and now finally having a vehicle that does pretty much everything I want - I dont want to have to get something else because I wasnt taking care of it. So far, its been worth the investment and its held up pretty well so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you both for all the information. There are just so many to choose from that I want to get something that I know will do what I need them to do.

One thing I plan on doing is taking better care of these tires this time around. Since my divorce, I’ve been learning to do all of this on my own including the financial aspect of it all. I will definitely look into getting everything to do it myself maybe I’ll find someone to come and show me the first time around just to be on the safe side.

Soooo... another question if anyone could answer. Thoughts on a leveling kit and would it have any impact on towing?
 

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Level kit should have no impact on towing.

What you need to rotate your own tires can be acquired pretty economically - around $150-200 for stands and a 3-ton jack. If you're a Sam's Club member, you can get a jack and one pair of stands for $122 plus shipping (said $10 to ship to me, but not sure where you're located). You'd need one more pair of stands (one at each corner), so another $30-40, and an electric impact wrench to remove the lugs ($40-100 depending on whether you want corded or cordless, and which brand), as well as a torque wrench and lug socket set ($30 or so at Harbor Freight). That's a lot to drop at once with tires, but I've been using the same floor jack and stands for about 20yrs.

As for how to use them, it's pretty easy, and there are some videos out there and instructions. TitanTalk is always a good resource. If you're anywhere close to northern Alabama I can show you how to rotate your tires, but that's a long shot as I suspect you're not close to this area.
 

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Yeah that is definitely a lot of items to purchase but at least I have from now till my new tires have 5k to 10k miles on them to get all of those things gathered up. Ugh!

Unfortunately, I do not live near northern Alabama as I’m outside of Pittsburgh, Pa. I don’t do so well with video learning as I’m more of a hands on type of person but I’ll take a look at a few to see the process. Most of my friends are not mechanical and some of them couldn’t even figure out how to get my spare tire down last year when I had a flat tire. Let’s just say, I NOW know how to get it down and won’t be asking those friends for help anytime soon. Lol

Certain garages and auto places have a tendency to try to take advantage of women so I try to avoid them for unnecessary services. My truck is still under warranty so anything major that goes wrong I take it back to the dealership but for tires and brakes that is definitely not the place to go due to cost. I have one place that I go to on occasion that doesn’t seem to price gouge me so much which is where I’ll get the tires mounted and the alignment done. I usually go to them when I don’t feel like changing the oil myself and for other minor purposes. So hopefully once I find the right tire (literally been looking for like 4 months) everything will work out.
 

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I have been a diehard Nitto person for nearly the past 20 years. I currently have the G2 Terra Grapplers and I have just over 80k miles on them over the past four years. There a good tire and good looking tire, they are also not too loud on the highway. I do a lot of camping and boating so I am constantly off road somewhat. I would also recommend to buy from Discount Tire if you have one near you. They do rotations and balances for free. Purchase the certificates also if there is any chance of damaging the tire.
 

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I currently run Michelin Defenders in the stock OEM size. They are quiet and smooth on the interstate at cruising speeds and have excellent handling on the back country roads. Have 80K mile tread wear warranty and cost about $220 each when I installed them 2 years ago. The Goodyear Wranglers never lasted more than 20K miles and I put 4 sets of those on before I switched to Michelin. Tires are kinda like beer, everyone has their own different flavor and taste. Good luck.
 
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