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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The first three links will take you to a couple of nitrous sites that will answer basic questions like: what is nitrous? How does it work? Is it flammable? Etc.

www.nosnitrous.com
www.nitrousexpress.com
www.coldfusionnitrous.com

Here’s a few other threads that have popped up here on TT that go over some things as well as some opinions and other questions that may have already been asked:

http://www.titantalk.com/forums/sho...=Nitrous+system

http://www.titantalk.com/forums/sho...=Nitrous+system

http://www.titantalk.com/forums/sho...=Nitrous+system

http://www.titantalk.com/forums/sho...=Nitrous+system

http://www.titantalk.com/forums/sho...=Nitrous+system



A few things that I’ll go over very quickly is that nitrous is non-flammable. Generally the optimum pressure is between 1050psig and 950psig. There are varying opinions on the “magic” number but you can jet the nozzle with the appropriate fuel supply according to the fuel pressure. There are several calculators for determining jet sizes but people should bear in mind that these are not absolutes. Going one size higher or lower on a jet will help fine tune the jetting application since no two vehicles are exactly the same. I use this calculator:
http://www.robietherobot.com/NitrousJetCalculator.htm

You’ll also hear about wet kits and dry kits. Direct port, single nozzle, dual stage, plate, and annular discharge systems are also out there. We’ll go over some of them.

The first thing is if the system is wet or dry. A wet system injects fuel with the nitrous for use as the fuel enrichment to make the power. To back up a step, nitrous works by breaking down the two nitrogen atoms from the single oxygen atoms from a single nitrous molecule (N2O). The oxygen needs to be burned so additional fuel has to be placed into the process or else a lean condition will exist. This is one of the major causes of engine damage when using nitrous. The nitrogen acts as a buffer of sorts in the combustion process. If you were to use raw oxygen, the temperatures reached would quickly melt the engine, thus the nitrogen in the process results in a less violent, hot burn in the cylinder. Wet systems generally use a nozzle or nozzles in which the nitrous and the fuel are mixed and injected at the same point. Of course, for the titan you’ll need to find a fuel source to run it. I use a stock fuel line that has been drilled to accept a fitting so I can get the fuel.

A dry system simply injects only the nitrous via the nozzle. The additional fuel is then injected by the fuel injectors by increasing the pressure of the fuel system, thereby giving each injector a bigger “squirt” when it opens. Another method that is relatively new to the nitrous world is to inject the nitrous just before the mass air sensor, causing it to become very cold and tricking the computer into thinking it needs more fuel and doing it that way. Some people have had success with this ‘new’ way. My own personal opinion is that I’m not so sure I want to rely on the fuel system operating at the stock settings trying to keep up with the extra nitrous. I run a wet system so that there is no doubt the correct amount of fuel is going in with the nitrous.

Of the kits out there, a single nozzle is the simplest. It’s just as it sounds – there is only one nozzle that injects the nitrous (dry) or the nitrous/fuel (wet). A direct port is generally referring to a system where there is one (or more!) nozzle per cylinder. These systems are installed such that the nozzle is plumbed into each intake runner or port. Plate systems are predominantly used in carbureted applications. A plate simply sandwiches in between the carburetor and the intake manifold. Jets are installed to the plate to meter the nitrous/fuel. Some fuel injected applications also use a plate system when the intake manifold can be separated to allow this. A dual stage system is usually just two nozzles or a plate system that is designed to handle two nitrous lines and two fuel lines. With this type of system a small primary stage can be activated and the second stage can then be activated at a later time. This is a good way to get a lot of power without trying to get traction with it all at the same time. An annular discharge nozzle is either a disc-type nozzle that sits on top of a carburetor or a nozzle that fits on the end of a cone-style air filter. This provides a straight shot into the induction system and not the typical 90 degree turn that the fluids must make with the other types of nozzles.

So what is there to a nitrous system? With a wet system (just like mine) you generally have the following:
• 10 pound bottle to store the nitrous
• Two solenoids – one for fuel and the other for nitrous
• One or two switches to power the system and activate the nitrous
• Various lines and hoses to connect the nitrous bottle to the solenoid to the nozzle, and from the fuel source to the solenoid to the nozzle.
• One nozzle
• Various jet sizes to meter the amount of nitrous and fuel.

That’s just the basics. There are other things you can put on. Filters on the nitrous and fuel are a good idea. Corrosion from the bottles that are used to fill your small bottle can clog things up or worse, lodge some debris where the nitrous solenoid seals shut thus causing a leak and damaging the engine if the fuel is not being added at the same time. I tend not to worry about a fuel filter on a fuel injected vehicle since the stock system usually does a great job of doing this for you. Some people just add one anyway for the extra insurance. A clogged fuel jet can also lean out the engine and damage it. A bottle heater is used to maintain enough bottle pressure to get the most from your system. Again there are a couple of choices. The basic setups just use a thermostat to maintain a particular pressure in the bottle. The other method is to use a pressure switch that will kick on the heater when the pressure drops to a set value and turn it off when an upper pressure value is reached. A pressure gauge for the nitrous is also helpful for jetting and also to let you know when you are running out of nitrous in the bottle. A remote bottle opener, usually a solenoid that is mounted near the bottle so you don’t have to open the bottle manually all the time, can be handy if you want to open your bottle ‘on the fly’. It can also serve as a second means of isolating the nitrous if there is a leak or if the nitrous solenoid gets stuck open for whatever reason. A Hobbs switch is also somewhat popular. This is connected to the fuel supply line and nitrous solenoid electronics. If the fuel pressure gets too low, the switch will not allow the nitrous solenoid to open thus preventing any engine damage. These are popular on carbureted setups. A window switch is an rpm activated switch. With nitrous you would set the ‘window’ to what rpm range you wanted the nitrous to be activated. This is a great way to cut nitrous off if you have a standard transmission or hit your rev limiter with any frequency. On most fuel injected vehicles, the rev limiter cuts off the fuel and when you’re flowing nitrous that can cause things to go lean in a hurry and damage the engine. The best thing about the window switches is that it’s automatic so you don’t have to do anything once it is set up. I don’t run one of these yet. It is a good idea to run one but I still rely on my manual button to cut things off for me. A TPS switch can also be used to turn on the nitrous. These are mounted inline with the TPS (throttle position sensor) wiring and will only let the solenoids open when it detects a full throttle condition. An ignition retard box is another nitrous add-on that can help things. These boxes retard the timing of the ignition to reduce the chance of detonation caused by running the nitrous. Alas, the titan’s ignition system is such that we cannot run one of these devices at this time. A purge kit is also used to remove any trapped gas in the nitrous line. This will ensure a full blast of nitrous the instant you hit the switch. Purging is done just before the run. Some purge kits just blow the nitrous out of a hose and some of the shizzle kits have lights that will change the color of the nitrous gas cloud when it’s purged. A bit too much bling if you ask me. A blowdown tube is mandatory at most tracks if you intend to keep the bottle mounted on the inside of your truck/car. This is just a tube that mounts to the bottle’s rupture disc for overpressure protection. If the pressure in the bottle gets too high, the rupture disc will burst and vent the bottle’s contents though the tube to outside of the vehicle.

Other nitrous hints are to run a colder range or two of sparkplugs and to run the highest octane fuel you can to prevent detonation. There are many other things you can add to your nitrous kit from different bottle brackets to different colored nozzles.

So how do you mount it? Well, find a good spot to mount the bottle firmly. If you get into a wreck or your vehicle rolls, you don’t want a 1000psig bottle rattling around in there with you. Mount lines so that they are away from heat sources. If you use rubber lines on the fuel side, make sure they are not going to be cut on anything and cause a leak. Consult the manufacturer on where to mount your nozzle. Generally you want it a few inches away from the TB (throttle body) on the upstream side of the TB. This usually means you have to drill something and tap it for whatever threads the nozzle is. There are nozzle nuts that are good for mounting through plastic or thin tubes or ducts if there isn’t a solid or thick piece of material to mount to. On my first setup I just used a short section of 3” exhaust tubing and a water drain gasket to house the nozzle and connect it inline with the stock TB and intake tube. That way there was nothing to drill on the stock stuff. These days I run a nozzle nut that penetrates the Volant intake tube and it is much more sturdy. My next setup will be a direct port mounted to a stock intake manifold.
For power, it’s a good idea to find a 12volt source that only comes on when the key is on. That way no matter what, when the key is off, the system is off in case you forget to turn off the master power switch (if you have one). The bottle heater is a good one to have mounted to a constant 12 volt source so it can keep the bottle ready in the pits in between runs. And yes, I’ve accidentally left it on overnight before and drained the battery for the next morning…
I like to use lighted switches so I can always tell when they are on. We’ve already touched on the activation switches – manual, TPS, or window.

In addition to the set up of the kit, make sure that if you buy different pieces from different kits that things are sized appropriately. It’s possible to buy a used kit off Ebay or off a forum and the solenoids are too small for what you need. It’s a good idea if you aren’t experienced enough to just buy a complete kit so that there is no doubt you have the right stuff.

That’s really all there is to it. Once you get the kit hooked up you’ll need to try it out. You’ll know right away if it’s working or not. This is where checking the spark plugs after a run come in handy as well. Consider that a must do. Remember that the baseline jetting is just that – baseline! The links at the beginning should give you some insight as to how to read the color on the spark plugs. Another way of doing this is to put your truck on a dyno with an O2 sensor. You have to have some way of monitoring the exhaust gases. This will show the air/fuel ratio and is also a great way to jet the system safely. I’m old school so it has taken a few runs at the track to do my jetting and rading the plugs. I also use a scanner program on a laptop to read the wideband O2 sensors on the truck to see what is going on during the run.

How much can I use? Well, that’s all up to you. For first timers, just go with the 50hp jets. You’ll definitely feel it and the power is easily manageable. If the truck starts to spin or lose control, it will be a lot easier with just 50hp extra than 150hp extra. At this point I haven’t seen any gains with anything over an 85hp setting using three different kinds of nozzles. I’m sure there is more to be had with nitrous on the titan but I am thinking the intake manifold just isn’t getting a good mix and equal distribution to all the cylinders. These intakes were designed to only flow air and not an aerosol of fuel and nitrous. Do some reading on the links and it’ll tell you what you’re in for as the hp levels rise.

I’d also like to dispel a couple of myths while I’m at it. Nitrous is a corrosive. However, it will not corrode your motor. Simply put, the nitrous is burned off so there is nothing sitting there eating away your engine. This sounds like an urban legend started by someone who lost to a guy using nitrous and needed an excuse. As stated earlier, nitrous is not flammable. It is an oxidizer, so if you were to put it into an open flame it would make the flame stronger and hotter. So if the bottle leaks, you aren’t going to blow up from the first spark. Besides, you’re smart enough to run a dump tube off the bottle so that’s not going to happen, right? The nitrous used is actually nitrous-plus. The “plus” is sulfur added to the nitrous so that you can smell it when it leaks and also so that you cannot get high off of it. This is why medical grade nitrous is hard to get since the dopers like to sniff it, but I’m a fan of it at the dentist’s office for sure. The bad thing about the sulfur is that some people think it builds up around the solenoid seal (usually Teflon) and that can cause a leak over time. I’m not convinced of this so if anyone gets pics of it I’d like to see it. Nitrous on your titan is not dangerous – you are. With a few exceptions from equipment failure (parts that move do eventually break after all) people not jetting their systems correctly or just adding more power than the engine components can happen are where nitrous gets a bad rap. Throw 300hp of nitrous onto a stock motor and it’ll work a few times but then you’d better have a spare ready when it blows. People love the power they get and more is better, right? So use your head and don’t get greedy with the power added.

Nitrous backfires. These can be caused from various things. With a small 50hp shot it is unlikely this will happen. Make sure you are still full throttle when you cut off the nitrous. Let the engine burn it off before you close the throttle. If you think the nitrous solenoid has been leaking or open when the engine hasn’t been running, don’t try to start it. You need to air out the intake system before trying that. You can also disable the ignition and let the engine roll over a few times to purge it.

OK so this is just the tip of the iceberg. Some people have different opinions about nitrous but it’s been my experience that the people that fear it or don’t like it have never run it. It’s like everything else in life – just don’t get stupid with it and you’ll be OK. I’ll add my disclaimer here that you’re on your own and if I tell you something then it will probably work but I’m not the only guy out there that can make this stuff work and don’t show up with a lawyer if your engine blows up from something going south. There is risk involved so I can’t say things will be rosy and you’ll beat that Hennessy Viper parked next door. But it is a lot of fun to run this stuff. I’ll post some pics to show a few things. Feel free to ask questions. And for the record I like superchargers and turbos, too. They offer some advantages over nitrous and have some disadvantages as well. So I hope this thread stays clean and remains on the topic for which it was created. Nitrous. Nawz. The Bottle. The Spray.

And the next time someone uses the line “Only babies use bottles”, just ask them “Then why are you the one doing the crying?”
:deathsent
 

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WOW!!...Very good thread, head.

Although I probably won't use it, it's nice to know. Which is just one of the many reasons why I enjoy this site so much-lots of good info.

Thanks again...
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Bottle mount pic - crew cab. The dump tube goes through the square vent facing the bed out of the rear of the cab. The vent tube goes on the small nub that is pointing towards the rear of the cab. This pic doesn't show the tube or the pressure gauge installed. This was when I was first determining where to put the bottle.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
This is the modified fuel hose. The fitting is just a 90 degree 1/8" NPT to -4AN fitting. I had a different fuel hose setup prior to this, hence the high pressure fuel hose and clamps. You could drill a stock fuel hose without removing the stock line from it if you do it this way. My first hose was not drilled on the end, I just inserted a barbed tee fitting into the rubber hose part and then went to the solenoid that way (with another barbed hose fitting mounted to the solenoid). The pics show the way I'm doing it now and it is much easier to run this way.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here's a couple of installed pics of the solenoids. I run the nitrous line through the same square vent that the dump tube exits the cab. The line then runs external to the truck underneath it and the engine and then up the front of the engine, behind the belt. Zip ties are your friend.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is the first nozzle, an old style NOS fogger. The tube is just 3" exhaust tubing. It was a little thin, but I got enough threads that the nozzle wouldn't rotate once installed. The rubber gasket is just for a 3" PVC drain - basically just a rubber coupler from Home Depot. I wrapped the tube in black electrical tape and it blended in well with the stock intake tubing. Enough that most everyone that saw it with the hood open at night at the dragstrip didn't even notice.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
This is a pic of the Ny-trex nozzle I'm using right now. It injects at a 70 degree angle versus the traditional 90 degree nozzle. In a large diameter tube, the 70 degree angle does a better job of getting the nitrous/fuel into the air stream for distribution. I have shown gains using this nozzle over both the NOS old-style nozzle and a NOS 'soft-plume' nozzle. It is also mounted on a nozzle nut that I run on the Volant tube.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
And here's a few of the solenoids off the vehicle. The thing here is that the fitting that goes to the nitrous solenoid inlet is a "filter fitting". There is a mesh filter mounted inside of the fitting to prevent debris from entering the solenoid and causing any obstructions or possible leaks at the seal. I check it every time I take the system off the truck. It's a good idea to check it every bottle if you can get to it.
 

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Toomnymods said:
Bet TheHeads titan would've smoked ur piece of crap..
Well, maybe, maybe not. I was just joking around. :jester: You should smile once and a while when whipped by a Ram.
I like your avatar.
 
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