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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a 07 CC LE non-BT.

I am getting:

-Prodigy brake controller
-Helper springs
-Class IV DrawTite Hitch
-Tow mirrors

I plan on towing a 8.5x20 enclosed trailer @ 6-8k lbs, 3000 miles, in 6 days.

Is this going to be a problem since i am a non-bt?

Manual says for my model non-bt, max trailer weight @ 7200.

Is the only reason I can't tow 9200 like the BT model because of the gearing? Can those tow mods above help?:confused:
 

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The gearing is the only major difference. Unless you are likely to be on real steep driveways or roads, I think you would be fine so far as weight goes. Tow in 4th gear; maybe 3rd on hills.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, this is just my first time towing, so just wanted to make sure it was a easy trip.

I probably won't get the Helper springs, sounds like it won't really help tow.

What do I need to get to connect the trailer light cables?

And to they make a Stainless Steel ball hitch that can tow more than 6k lbs?
 

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Yeah, this is just my first time towing, so just wanted to make sure it was a easy trip.
6-8k isn't an easy trip....That's pretty much a full load...
Since you haven't towed before, you might want to keep it no more then 55 mph to help break in the diff...
 

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loufish said:
6-8k isn't an easy trip....That's pretty much a full load...
Since you haven't towed before, you might want to keep it no more then 55 mph to help break in the diff...
Not to dampen your sprits, but depending on how the load in the trailer is distributed without a weight distribution (WD) hitch you might find your rear riding pretty low. Nissan recommends with loads above 5,000 pounds to use a WD hitch. As mentioned you’ll also want to follow the towing break-in procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thclimer said:
Not to dampen your sprits, but depending on how the load in the trailer is distributed without a weight distribution (WD) hitch you might find your rear riding pretty low. Nissan recommends with loads above 5,000 pounds to use a WD hitch. As mentioned you’ll also want to follow the towing break-in procedure.
If so, anyone know a good brand / cheap price to pick up a weight distribution hitch at? I know I'm going to have to drive through the Rockies, and that is a bit of a concern.

Also, what is the break in procedure? I'm at 2500 miles right now, and I haven't towed yet.
 

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I would not tow 8000 pounds through the rockies with a non big-tow, it will do it but it will be a struggle.
 

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wojowojo16 said:
I would not tow 8000 pounds through the rockies with a non big-tow, it will do it but it will be a struggle.
I respectfully disagree. I live in an area where there are nothing BUT hills and 6% grades are the norm. My truck is a non-big-tow truck and it does just fine towing my 7,000# travel trailer. The rear axles are the same in the trucks, it's just the gears that are different. The BT gears just allow for higher engine RPMs when towing. Tow in 4, allow the engine to rev up and it will tow fine.

You really have two things you need if you're going to tow that much weight: Decent tires and a weight-distributing, sway-cancelling hitch. The crummy tires the trucks come with aren't stiff enough for good control, and they will overheat when loaded with as much as you want to put on them. You can get a set of LT-rated tires for not that much money, and it is money well spent. Get a set of rims and save the tires the truck came with for burnouts and drifting.

And yes, you DO need to spend the bux on a sway-cancelling hitch. You can move the hitch to other vehicles and trailers, so you're not going to lose any money. It's worth it in the long run to have a more comfortable experience and TO BE SAFE. Personally, I tow with a Reese, but there are lots of good choices available. Go somewhere where they know their business and they will set you up right.

Good for you, you're approaching this the right way: checking with other owners and tapping their expertise. FWIW, I've towed for some 30 years with a LOT of different cars and trucks, and I congratulate you on owning one of the best tow vehicles out there.

And you should check your book about first-time towing. In mine, it said to keep speeds under 50 for the first 500 miles of towing duty. They mean what they say - the gears are under heavy load, so they are meshing much more deeply than they normally do - there are parts of the teeth that haven't come in contact with each other and therefore aren't self-polished. That self-polishing action generates heat, and as the gears become polished, they mesh without creating excess heat. You hold the speed down initially to allow that greater heat to happen and dissipate without problems.

Hope this helps. :cheers:
 

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rgrtitan said:
If so, anyone know a good brand / cheap price to pick up a weight distribution hitch at? I know I'm going to have to drive through the Rockies, and that is a bit of a concern.

Also, what is the break in procedure? I'm at 2500 miles right now, and I haven't towed yet.
http://www.rvwholesalers.com
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Steamguy said:
I respectfully disagree. I live in an area where there are nothing BUT hills and 6% grades are the norm. My truck is a non-big-tow truck and it does just fine towing my 7,000# travel trailer. The rear axles are the same in the trucks, it's just the gears that are different. The BT gears just allow for higher engine RPMs when towing. Tow in 4, allow the engine to rev up and it will tow fine.

You really have two things you need if you're going to tow that much weight: Decent tires and a weight-distributing, sway-cancelling hitch. The crummy tires the trucks come with aren't stiff enough for good control, and they will overheat when loaded with as much as you want to put on them. You can get a set of LT-rated tires for not that much money, and it is money well spent. Get a set of rims and save the tires the truck came with for burnouts and drifting.

And yes, you DO need to spend the bux on a sway-cancelling hitch. You can move the hitch to other vehicles and trailers, so you're not going to lose any money. It's worth it in the long run to have a more comfortable experience and TO BE SAFE. Personally, I tow with a Reese, but there are lots of good choices available. Go somewhere where they know their business and they will set you up right.

Good for you, you're approaching this the right way: checking with other owners and tapping their expertise. FWIW, I've towed for some 30 years with a LOT of different cars and trucks, and I congratulate you on owning one of the best tow vehicles out there.

And you should check your book about first-time towing. In mine, it said to keep speeds under 50 for the first 500 miles of towing duty. They mean what they say - the gears are under heavy load, so they are meshing much more deeply than they normally do - there are parts of the teeth that haven't come in contact with each other and therefore aren't self-polished. That self-polishing action generates heat, and as the gears become polished, they mesh without creating excess heat. You hold the speed down initially to allow that greater heat to happen and dissipate without problems.

Hope this helps. :cheers:
Wow, that was very in depth, I appreciate that very much to all the guys who chipped in their piece. I have 2 months till I have to make that haul, but in the meantime, I'm just going to keep tapping you guys for your experience / expertise.
 

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Let us know after the trip how it pulled and your thoughts on it. Good luck dude!
 

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Anyone know a good and cheap LT tire to buy?
Make up your mind...What's it going to be?
 

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mtofell said:
Most would argue those are contradicting terms.....
I got a set of takeoffs with two miles on them for $480. They're Continental blackwalls, but hey, the truck has almost 45,000 miles on them versus the 23,000 I got out of the original Goodyears.

The tire store I deal with is 2 blocks away from a big Ford dealer. Seems that some Ford guys don't think $48,000 is enough to spend on a truck. This guy had come in and spent another $3,000 on tires and wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
loufish said:
Make up your mind...What's it going to be?
Good point, but as a "internet buyer" I tend to get the most bang for my buck. I refuse to pay a premium at a store, if I know I can get the same product online for much cheaper.

But if it came down to it, "good LT tire" would be first on the list.
 

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not trying to hi-jack your thread, but does anybody have experience w/ uhaul towing products? i installed a uhaul hitch on my 07 se cc non bt but have yet to use it... i mean, they are a hauling company... any input??
 

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MIZZARK said:
not trying to hi-jack your thread, but does anybody have experience w/ uhaul towing products? i installed a uhaul hitch on my 07 se cc non bt but have yet to use it... i mean, they are a hauling company... any input??
And I'm making it worse by replying...

I used U-haul hitches on two of my trucks, they were just as good as anything else out there, no problems. Remember, they have a reputation to protect and have to have a good product otherwise they'd be litigated right out of business.

Just make sure that the hitch you had them install is up to the load you can tow with your truck.
 

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thanks a bunch!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I have to say, I just installed my Drawtite Class iv round tube hitch, what a cinch! Took 5 minutes, and I bought it for $120! Got all the wiring stuff / brake controller for $160, that's not too far off from the bt, and waayyy less $$$.
 
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