Nissan Titan Forum banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
983 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone out there know the best way to try and break into a motorsports photography job? is kartman still around?
i want to be one of the guys in the kodak vests with unlimited access everywhere at the tracks. are the majority of them freelancers that sell pics to magazines?
Also if you take pics at a track, what are the copyright laws regarding selling them? like if you were to enlarge them and sell them on a website?
any help would be appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,655 Posts
send kartman a pm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,278 Posts
Get some seriously long lenses with a 2.8 aperture, you are gonna need them.
Take pictures of everything in all sorts of light, learn how to use your camera in fully manual mode and try everything you can think of, always be a student of photography and allow yourself to view the ordinary as extraordinary because a photo of it may be just that.

YouTube - Formula 1 Photographer Interview Darren Heath
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
It depends on what you want to use them for, Usually there is a contract involved and a disclaimer saying that they have the right to use the picture for anything they choose. and you get the credit. I'll talk to my father he's a professional photographer. He's shot some NFL games, high fashion runway models and a bunch of horse racing events. I'm sure he will know the rules. I'll get back to you tomorrow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
983 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
thanks for all the advice. that was a good video. thanks twisted, id like to know what he says about it as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,020 Posts
You probably just need a media/press pass of some sorts. To get one of those I think you have to submit photos to "X" number of magazines/newspapers on a weekly/monthly basis or something along that sorts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
I shot stock car oval track years ago, and I'm re-opening my photo business as a retirement gig to do mostly weddings, but...

Generally the venue will require a release to shoot there there (like a race track) unless it's on public streets that are closed. Generally individual vehicles/drivers don't need to be released because they're in a public place. Press passes are good to have as they can drastically reduce your need to produce paperwork.

The equipment you need will depend on the venues you shoot. Make photos with what you have. The needs of each track are different. Long teles on long straight-aways can be excellent, but are useless if you're stuck on a tight turn, then a wide-zoom is better. If you can't shoot in a venue with what you've got, then get what you need when you get it. You'd be surprised at what you can do with modest equpment if you exercise a little imagination, and gain the technical expertise to use what you've got to it's fullest.

Roger
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,278 Posts
I shot stock car oval track years ago, and I'm re-opening my photo business as a retirement gig to do mostly weddings, but...

Generally the venue will require a release to shoot there there (like a race track) unless it's on public streets that are closed. Generally individual vehicles/drivers don't need to be released because they're in a public place. Press passes are good to have as they can drastically reduce your need to produce paperwork.

The equipment you need will depend on the venues you shoot. Make photos with what you have. The needs of each track are different. Long teles on long straight-aways can be excellent, but are useless if you're stuck on a tight turn, then a wide-zoom is better. If you can't shoot in a venue with what you've got, then get what you need when you get it. You'd be surprised at what you can do with modest equpment if you exercise a little imagination, and gain the technical expertise to use what you've got to it's fullest.

Roger
Good advice but also remember that the most important part of your gear are high quality lenses of a fixed large aperture, 2.8 or lower. Magazine cover shots are made with good glass, without it you can pack up and go home if making money is your objective.

Publishers want tack sharp images to work with in most cases and if you can't produce them, they will find someone who can. It's fine to start small and cut your teeth with lesser gear but always keep your eye on the best glass as a goal for your equipment case.

Here is one image I am particularly proud of, not because it was taken with my best lens or because it is such a great photo but because it is the photo that the 3 other pros at the event did not get. It's all about knowing your equipment and making the most of your opportunities and the best equipment in the world won't save you if you can't make it work to your advantage.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
Most camera shops will let you rent lenses for a weekend if your needs change. It's a lot cheaper than buying a lens every time you need one. Especially long telephoto 3000mm with image stabilization.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,278 Posts
Most camera shops will let you rent lenses for a weekend if your needs change. It's a lot cheaper than buying a lens every time you need one. Especially long telephoto 3000mm with image stabilization.
The major shop in my area stopped renting lenses although I think you can still rent lighting there. I also think you may be able to mail order rent big glass but I'm not sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
I don't think you'll need a ton of lighting if your shooting race events. Maybe a dual flash set up or a remote flash. Don't forget to white balance the camera before you shoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,370 Posts
I can't recall the name, as I've been out of the Semi-Pro side for 11 years, but there is a Media Photography Association that may be helpful to join. ASMP? American Society of Media Photograpers? Somebody will know. Look into that...

Learn a good way to organize your images well. ACDSee is highly rated. Backup your images. 1 Terabyte Internal drives are now $89. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
My father emailed me back and basically said that everything you take pictures of must have a release. (ie) Track pictures must have a release from the owner of the track, and owner of the vehicle, in order to sell the image for profit for advertising use the image must also be copy written. If you sell it to a news paper you it is considered editorial use and does not need a release.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,370 Posts
There is an inexpensive book available for Copyright Issues for Photographers. Might be $20-25. Can be a complicated issue, but not too complicated. Info above is accurate! But study on the subjects, Copyright, Property Release and Model Release, Work for Hire etc.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
74,488 Posts
it's not easy but there is some great advice above.

i shoot what i love..... sometimes people want to buy prints from me, it's pretty rewarding.

as far as submitting to mags.... it's a game and a crappy one at that. if you've covered an event and you feel like you've got something great, a magazine will string you along enough to make your images useless. it happens. there is a game to this field and i'm doing my best to learn it.

the difference between a successful photographer and an unsuccessful one sometimes isn't about whom has the best image, it's often whom has the best business sense.

i'm looking into doing something similar to what you are pursuing. i'm tired of sitting at a desk inside all day, it's no way to spend one's life IMO. I feel alive when I'm covering an event featuring something I love, cars, surfing, action sports....

nikon has the best glass IMO but Canon has the technology.......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,278 Posts
One of my favorite sites is here.

Photography community, including forums, reviews, and galleries from Photo.net

I learned an awful lot about photography from the site and that knowledge enabled me to photograph everything from air shows to cat shows and everything in between competently. Knowledge and experience are what it takes to be good and seeing the light along with viewing things with new eyes are the best tips I can give you.

I don't think of myself as a great photographer by any means but I am technically competent and try very hard. I take lots of photographs of the things I want to "get right" and along with technical competence and perseverance, I get my share of "keepers".

I also have used photography to justify some of the expense of my hobby which is roughly in the 15,000.00 range now, for example, the last lens I bought that the wife was semi-complaining about enabled me to get some exceptional photos at my daughter's wedding and one great photo alone is worth the 1700.00 I spent on the 70-200 L series IS lens.

Glass is expensive but it's what separates technically good images from the great ones and although it won't help you decide what to shoot or how to shoot it, a great lens will allow you to make tack sharp images of a turd if that's what you choose to photograph.

I would not have gotten many candids such as the one I attached without a long, fast, image stabilized lens and they are wonderful tools for all sorts of photographs not just long distance sports or wildlife.

Pick your lenses first, then pick the gear you need to compliment those lenses. Even if you can't afford them now, build your gear collection around the lenses you want to end up with and you will save money in the long run. Cameras come and go, good glass can last you an entire career if you take care of it.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,278 Posts
just go get a hasselblad and skip the rest. if you have 40 grand laying around:rofl:
Ain't that the truth but I didn't and still don't have the 40 grand to "get started", lol.

I even used to shoot with a thing called film, how quaint, lol. It's funny though, a lot of pros still shoot slides and catalog them but in the end, many of those slides are scanned to digital anyway so my advice is to skip the middle step.

Great images can be had with a 1500.00 camera and a 500.00 fixed focal length lens nowadays and I am amazed with the progress digital photography has made over the last few years.

If you want great glass and can't afford a zoom lens if that is your preference like mine, buy fixed focal length glass and zoom with your feet if need be. fixed glass will save you a ton of money if you can make it work for you but I shoot too many candids and sports to try and find my distance for every shot and that's especially true if you are trying to get by with one camera like I do.

I took the photo I attached with the Canon 100-400 3.5-5.6 L series IS lens. it's not a tack sharp lens but a good substitute if you don't have 3 or 4 grand laying around for a fixed 2.8 400mm lens and for me, the zoom capability was one of the things I was after as well, in fact, I built my entire gear bag around the purchase of this one lens because I needed it for sports but it's not much good for that unless it's outdoor daytime events.

Choose the lenses you need to do your job and the rest of the gear is expendable or "upgradeable" as far as I'm concerned.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
most of the high fashion shoots my father uses medium format film. I have an entire remote studio in my living room that my dad uses when he flys in for weekend shoots I'll get some pictures of it up tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Choose the lenses you need to do your job and the rest of the gear is expendable or "upgradeable" as far as I'm concerned.
I've shot Hassy, Leica, and Canon EOS film equipment (along with a bunch of others including 4x5) over the years. I'm also a long time member of photo.net, although I don't post much and haven't any work up there.

He's absolutely right about the glass. When I sold my last Hassy & Canon gear right before the film market tanked, I didn't replace it. When I did, I chose Olympus 4/3rds... for the glass. You can argue sensor specs all day, but the glass makes the system. I didn't return to Canon, and I had all "L" (low-dispersion, high-end) Canon glass.

My 35-100 (70-200 effective focal length) constant aperture f/2 zoom is probably the finest lens I've ever owned. I've got a half-dozen other lenses, but it's my favorite for nearly everything telephoto. No other manufacturer has anything close to it. A good glass system will last through four or five generations of bodies. Now... recognize that the list on the 35-100 is $3199, and it sells on the street for about $2600. That'll take a lot of car photo sales to pay for itself tho!

I'm a big believer in buying used... let some other guy eat the depreciation. I bought that lens, an E3 body, two FL-50r flashes, and three other lenses from a guy in Chicago for $3500. He wanted Canon. My gain... it was over $6k worth of gear.

Evaluate what you need. When you buy, don't cheap out. Don't let anyone sell you on gear. Do your homework, and buy what works for you and your style. Research and buy the system, not a specific body. Once you have several thousand wrapped up, you're stuck. Had I not been starting from scratch, I'd still be shooting Canon.

Roger
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top