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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just tackled the replacement of a leaky Power Steering Pressure hose in my 2004 4x4 Titan. First, since the factory service manual is of almost no help in this case, I want to thank George3111987 for his most helpful write-up, which can be found here:

http://www.titantalk.com/forums/titan-problems-dealer-service/84839-power-steering-hose-2.html

My truck threw a few curveballs at me that didn't seem to bother George3111987. So for everyone else's benefit I'm adding my 2 cents.

First step is to get the right hose.

This thread has a good picture: http://www.titantalk.com/forums/titan-general-discussion/105878-hoses-not-good-60-000-check-2.html

I got mine from Mossy Nissan for about $125. Part #497207S000. You should also ask for the two washers that get attached on either side of the eye joint at the pump. They're expensive, about $4 each. Also get at least a pint of PS fluid. You might want a second one, depending on how much you spill. You might as well get a oil filter and a crush washer for the drain plug since you'll already be under your truck, have it jacked up, and will have the engine under cover off. An oil change will be a snap.

The next step is to find a few quality hours to spend with your titan. It took me about 6 hours, but hopefully you'll be more efficient than me!

Prepare for lots of PS fluid to his the ground, and then pop the hood. Now try to remove the pressure sensor. I had a hell of a time getting mine off. I finally gave up and loosened the harness ties so I had some slack in the line, then removed the large nut that holds the eye joint of the hose assembly onto the PS pump. That took a 15/16" wrench. Not sure of the metric equivalent. Once that's out, the two $4 washers fall to the ground. Leave them there since you bought 2 new ones that you're supposed to replace anyhow. Now with a little slack in the hose, and slack in the wiring harness for the sensor, maybe you can be smarter than me and easily figure out how it comes off. I finally fooled around with a little screwdriver and found the tiny piece than needs to be depressed to make the connector unsnap. Look at the sensor on your new hose. If you look carefully, you'll see how the connector locks on.

Now get under the truck and remove the engine under cover. Mine had 4 allen head type bolts (5/16" worked for me). They're tight, so you want to use a 3/8" or 1/2" rachet attachment. There are also 2 10mm bolts further back.

Grab a beer. The hard (and dirty) part begins.

Locate the clamp assembly that attaches the hose to the center of the front crossmember. Clear away the grease and grim that has accumulated because of your leak, and remove the 2 10mm bolts that attach the clamp, and the 10 mm bolt that keeps the clamp closed. With your fingers, you can now bend the clamp enough to release the hose. Move towards the drivers side, and remove 2 more 10 mm bolts that attach the smaller but similar clamp. I wasn’t able to spread this clamp open until I removed the PS line from the steering box.

Now, add a few more joints to your forearms, or get creative and with a 14 mm flare nut wrench remove the hose from the steering box. With the hose loose you should be able to spread the remaining clamp by prying it apart with a small screwdriver.

Your old leaky hose is now free. But before you rip it out and stomp on it in a gesture of domination over the source of your frustration, pay attention to how its routed. Duplicate this routing with your new hose. Attach the eye joint to the pump. Don’t forget the $4 washers. Plug in the pesky sensor plug. Re-attach any harness ties you removed. Crawl back under your truck and re-contort yourself to attach the PS hose to the steering box. Oil the o-ring first, and be very careful not to cross thread it. You don’t want to embark on a steering box removal project because of carelessness at this point.

Here’s where you’re on your own. Somehow figure out a way to re-attach those pesky clamps. The little one is a bugger. Hopefully you paid attention to the orientation of the clamps and the rubber pieces before you ripped them apart. You’ll be tired and frustrated at this point. Fight though that and do it right. Cleaning things up before you try to reattach them will probably help.

Do quick oil change since you’re there, re-attach the engine lower cover and you’re done. Right? Wrong! For me, this was only half the battle.

The next few hours were spent trying to get PS fluid into the lines, and air out of them. The service manual just tells you to add PS fluid to the reservoir, crank the wheel fully left a right a few times, then idle the engine and do the same, check for air bubbles/foam, and repeat if necessary. After a half dozen attempts, and lots of fluid on the floor, I decided there had to be a better way.

I suggest this:
1) Jack up the front of the truck so the wheels are off the ground.
2) Fill the reservoir to the min line.
3) Crank the wheel left and right twice (engine off)
4) Crank the wheel left and right twice (engine on)
5) With a turkey baster (don’t let your wife see this) suck out the foamy fluid from the reservoir, and squirt into a clear glass container.
6) While the foam is settling in the glass, add more clean unfoamy fluid to the reservoir to the min line.
7) Crank the wheel left and right twice (engine off)
8) Check fluid level and add to min level (w/ clear unfoamy fluid) if necessary
8) Crank the wheel left and right twice (engine on)
9) Return to step 5 and continue this process until you get clear fluid.

The trick is to keep adding un-foamy fluid and removing foamy fluid until all the air is gone. The level needs to be high enough that the system can pull in good fluid when the engine is running, but not so full that when you crank the wheel (engine off) fluid doesn’t overflow the reservoir. Once the foam has settled in your clear container feel free to reintroduce it to the reservoir.

This whole process can take quite a while. I probably ran 10 or 12 of these cycles before the air was gone. Hopefully by using the w/ the turkey baster method from the start, you’ll have better luck than did I.

Final step is to drink your last beer and contemplate whether or not you saved enough by not have the dealership do this in the first place.
 

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yeah mine just started leaking stealership wants to do it for 385.00 plus tax sucks because ihve the extendedgold warranty with the deductible and they said it is not covered.
 

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yeah mine just started leaking stealership wants to do it for 385.00 plus tax sucks because ihve the extendedgold warranty with the deductible and they said it is not covered.
I'm not understanding how thats not covered under the Gold warranty? I had one replaced under my Nissan Extended when i was still under it. I think they are jacking with you. Actually i had 2 replaced under warranty.
 

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I'm not understanding how thats not covered under the Gold warranty? I had one replaced under my Nissan Extended when i was still under it. I think they are jacking with you. Actually i had 2 replaced under warranty.
That is what i dint understand either but the warranty that i got with the deductible doesnt cover it there are certain hoses it wont apparently there are two gold warranties mine doesnt. The other one has no deductible at all really sucks.
 

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That is what i dint understand either but the warranty that i got with the deductible doesnt cover it there are certain hoses it wont apparently there are two gold warranties mine doesnt. The other one has no deductible at all really sucks.
I had a $50 deductible and they covered mine twice. Oh well, still sounds like BS to me. I'd b!tch a little and see if they'd good will fix it or pay half or something.
 

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I am so glad for this site. I have an '06. I find random leaks from various places on my truck all the time, mostly due to Nissan's crappy OEM clamps. I can usually fix them with one from HD. I wasn't sure how to tackle this problem, but thanks everyone! I don't know what I would do without this site, as mentioned before the service manual was not really helpful for PS related issues.
 

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I know this is an old post but wanted to post the proper way to bleed your power steering system. Do not do the steps above. this way is much easier than that and safer for your system. This is assuming you have drained your power steering system due to replacing the hose or replacing the power steering pump.

1. Fill up your reservoir to the max line.
2. Start the truck
3. Turn the wheel all the way right and left 2 times.
4. While the truck is still running, check your reservoir. If the fluid is below the MIN line, add more fluid until it is at the MIN line (again while the truck is running).
5. Wait a little while to see if the fluid is still bubbly or clear. If bubbly, repeat steps 3-5 until the fluid remains clear and the level stabilizes at the MIN line.
6. Put the cap back on the reservoir and turn your wheel back and forth a few times to make sure it turns smooth without any whining.

This is a lot easier with two people. Basically the person on the outside simply adds fluid to keep it at the MIN line while the person inside just steers back and forth.
 

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FYI: Current cost for this job (replace all power steering hoses) at an independent shop in San Diego, California is $418 as of today. I'm having this work done right now. Sure glad that I do NOT need a new rack.
 
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