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Hello TT members,

Got this from a friend...

PUMPING GAS--GOOD TO KNOW

I've been in petroleum pipeline business for about 31 years, currently working for the Kinder-Morgan Pipeline here in San Jose , CA .. We deliver about 4 million gallons in a 24-hour period from the pipe line; one day it's diesel, the next day it's jet fuel and gasoline. We have 34 storage tanks here with a total capacity of 16,800,000 gallons. Here are some tricks to help you get your money's worth:

1. Fill up your car or truck in the morning when the temperature is still cool. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground; and the colder the ground, the denser the gasoline. When it gets warmer gasoline expands, so if you're filling up in the afternoon or in the evening, what should be a gallon is not exactly a gallon. In the petroleum business, the specific gravity and temperature of the fuel (gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, ethanol and other petroleum products) are significant. Every truckload that we load is temperature-compensated so that the indicated gallonage is actually the amount pumped. A one-degree rise in temperature is a big deal for businesses, but service stations don't have temperature compensation at their pumps.

2. If a tanker truck is filling the station's tank at the time you want to buy gas, do not fill up; most likely dirt and sludge in the tank is being stirred up when gas is being delivered, and you might be transferring that dirt from the bottom of their tank into your car's tank.

3. Fill up when your gas tank is half-full (or half-empty), because the more gas you have in your tank the less air there is and gasoline evaporates rapidly, especially when it's warm. (Gasoline storage tanks have an internal floating 'roof' membrane to act as a barrier between the gas and the atmosphere, thereby minimizing evaporation.)

4. If you look at the trigger you'll see that it has three delivery settings: slow, medium and high. When you're filling up do not squeeze the trigger of the nozzle to the high setting. You should be pumping at the slow setting, thereby minimizing vapors created while you are pumping. Hoses at the pump are corrugated; the corrugations act as a return path for vapor recovery from gas that already has been metered. If you are pumping at the high setting, the agitated gasoline contains more vapor, which is being sucked back into the underground tank, so you're getting less gas for your money. Hope this will help ease your 'pain at the pump'
 

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Wow, interesting......... Now I will be spending a lot more time at the gas station, slowly pumping and clogging up traffic.
 

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That has been circulating in email for a while now.

I'll agree with item 2. For item 1 and 3, while it might be true in theory, but I really wonder how much of a difference we are talking here. Do we waste more money in the penny cup?

http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/gastips.asp
 

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I agree with you musky, the tank is under ground. The air temp does not affect the gas temp in the ground. There is only about 2 gallons exposed (guessing). So the only time I would worry about the temp is when they are getting refilled and the new gas might be a lot warmer.
 

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4 is interesting... though living in one of only two states in the nation that doesn't permit the average joe to pump his own gas, i'm SOL on this one. i could ask, but i'm sure most attendants don't want to spend 30 minutes filling up my tank on the slow setting. LOL
 

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if pumping gas into this beast didnt take long enough already lol
 

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Number 2 has been a no brainer for years. The others though, slow pumping, do it when half full, a.m. pumping....as MuskyHunter mentioned, all sound ehh....ok in theory, but are probably more myth than fact. Having said that, it is all quite interesting.
 

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Interesting, but he is wrong about all gas stations having their tanks underground, a lot of small non brand stations in my area have above ground fuel tanks.
 

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I've heard the specific gravity one before, but like all of the prior people have said, how much of a difference could it be? It does make a little sense for areas that have drastic differences in their temperature...
 

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I've always heard 3 alot, but a little different. See another theory is keeping your tank half full to near E (not when the red light comes on.) Never fill up full because you're carrying around half a tank of unused gas, which is extra weight you're hauling. Having less fuel to carry around is less mpgs wasted going to the pump instead of keeping a heavy full tank. Plus gas stations are everywhere here in Houston so distance going to one is not alot wasted for me.
 

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albonismo said:
I've always heard 3 alot, but a little different. See another theory is keeping your tank half full to near E (not when the red light comes on.) Never fill up full because you're carrying around half a tank of unused gas, which is extra weight you're hauling. Having less fuel to carry around is less mpgs wasted going to the pump instead of keeping a heavy full tank. Plus gas stations are everywhere here in Houston so distance going to one is not alot wasted for me.
very interesting. i've never heard that one... but i bet it would help more than the half full thing. still not sure how significant of a difference it would be, but i would think the added weight would cost you more in gas (through loss of economy) than would any evaporation when filling the tank (i.e. you'd save more with the half-empty method that you suggest than you would with the half-full method mentioned in the first post).

i wonder if there's any potential negative consequences of running on a half tank of gas all the time?
 

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I've read in the local paper, that Congress is working on Federal legislation concerning the temp affect on pump accuracy. I think it is just a beuricratic (sp) waste of effort for the payback and cost involved.

I've never seen above ground Gas tanks at a station, interesting! :)
 

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SirKeats said:
very interesting. i've never heard that one... but i bet it would help more than the half full thing. still not sure how significant of a difference it would be, but i would think the added weight would cost you more in gas (through loss of economy) than would any evaporation when filling the tank (i.e. you'd save more with the half-empty method that you suggest than you would with the half-full method mentioned in the first post).

i wonder if there's any potential negative consequences of running on a half tank of gas all the time?
they always play these catchy commercials here in texas to help with gas, litter or anything like that on tv and the radio.

this one's my favorite, very catchy.
http://www.drivecleanacrosstexas.org/campaign_materials/tv_radio/radiospot/you_can_help_eng.mp3
 

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TitanBlue said:
I've read in the local paper, that Congress is working on Federal legislation concerning the temp affect on pump accuracy. I think it is just a beuricratic (sp) waste of effort for the payback and cost involved.

I've never seen above ground Gas tanks at a station, interesting! :)
In Louisiana they are making everyone pull up there in ground tanks and install above ground tanks. Most places I see have above ground tanks. The company I work for just had to pull up all their in ground jet fuel tanks and install double walled above ground tanks.
 

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I wish I had my mothers mph from her little camry for my titan.4 cylinder she has. I fill up every week or so.She fills up every other week or so.
 

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I saw a thing on tv about this not too long ago. About number 1 they said it is true but it is very insignificant. It is a much bigger deal to truckers who are filling up much more than the average joe. Number 2 is correct. Never heard of 3 or 4. Unfortunately for me having a diesel I can't or shouldn't really go below a 1/4 tank. :( I fill up a lot, lol.
 

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In Canada big oil was on the losing end of dense fuel because of cold weather for a good part of the year. Now gas is sold volume corrected to 15 degees C.
 

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Coldtitan said:
In Canada big oil was on the losing end of dense fuel because of cold weather for a good part of the year. Now gas is sold volume corrected to 15 degees C.
I just got back from a trip to Canada and noticed a sticker on the pump saying the Liters are corrected to 15 deg C.
 
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