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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, title basically states what I’m after. I have a 2018 Nissan Titan 4x4 Crew. It’s not the XD. I’m looking at a camper with an overall length of 32’. It has a dry weight of 6,400 lbs and a GVWR of 8,500 lbs. My Titan is rated at 9,400lbs tow capacity. But is that realistic? I’ve got a Curt 10-15k trunnion weight distribution anti sway hitch and brake controller installed. Is the Titan capable of towing that?
We’ve been searching for months for a trailer and finally found the one we like, so I really hate to tell my wife it’s not in the cards. But I also don’t want to put us in danger either. Anyone got experience with this? What is yalls take? Thanks.

If it matters, 85% of the time I’ll be towing in Texas and the southern states, Florida, Alabama etc. However, I will make my way occasionally north to Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.
 

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I do not tow a ton....with my 05 CC with the tow package, is also rated to 9400. I have pulled roughly 9K (John deere 110 back hoe (7kish)) on a 20ft dual axle trailer (roughly 2kish). in the hills of VT more than a few times.

but there are people with significantly greater towing experience than I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I’ve pulled a case D35 (3100lbs) and a Top hat square tube trailer (2k) with my Titan and it did well. I’m able to pull it at 75mph no problem. I did that with no weight distribution hitch or brake controller. Not the smartest but it did it. Lol
I almost feel it is under rated. Because with my 16 ram 1500, rated at more towing capacity. My Titan pulled it a lot better.
Im curious how much different that camper will make it though. I’ll be adding roughly 2300-2500 lbs loaded. Plus the tall walls will catch the wind. The new distribution/anti sway hitch should cover that though.
 

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So really, you are missing the most important number. Based on the GCWR, you are probably fine. But where 99% of RV combos fail is on the payload rating of the truck vs the tongue weight of the trailer. RV's are much more tongue heavy than the flatbed trailers they use to set the towing limits. That tongue weight comes right off the payload capacity. You must take into account what you will be loading into the truck as well. Any tools, gear, wife, dog, kids that will be in the truck will also play into the overall payload (a 200lb driver and full tank of gas is factored into the payload rating already). First, add all those weights up; better yet, actually load up the truck and head to a CAT scale to see what the real weight is. That number comes off the overall payload.

Now look at the spec for your trailer. It will usually give a overall dry weight and dry tongue weight. Figure out what the percentage of Tongue Weight is dry (usually 12-15%). Now look at the maximum loaded trailer weight (GVWR of the RV) and multiply by the percentage dry tongue to get a good estimate of the loaded tongue weight (assumes your gear in the trailer will be evenly distributed). Now also subtract this weight from the overall payload lefty over from step one above. If you are over the overall payload capacity, then the combo won't work (you may not be over the GCWR which is what they use to determine the overall towing capacity).

If you are within the payload capacity, then what the WDH is going to help you with is redistributing some of the weight from the rear axle to the front axle, keeping your rear axle below its GAWR and adding weight back onto to front axle so you retain proper steering feel and function.

FWIW, I tow a 6000# travel trailer that is a bit tongue heavy, and I am right at the RGAWR and Payload ratings when fully loaded for camp. But as another poster indicates above, my Titan tows it very well, feels well controlled and still has lots of power. We tow through the Adirondacks regularly and it handles those grades with no issues; but I do not have experience (yet) with high and long mountain passes that may be found out west or in the lower Appalachians.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay, so off of the calculations you sent, if I was to load the truck to the weight of my passengers and their stuff. I’d be sitting at 8,400 usable pounds. That’s me subtracting the tongue weight, passengers, and stuff.
The camper has a Max weight, considering if I loaded it down with 2,200lbs worth the stuff would put me over my max (after the subtractions) gvwr of the truck by 300 pounds.

So does that extra 300lbs mean it’s a no go? Or is their a +\- percentage there?
 

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Let's try a real example:

My Titan's payload capacity is 1267#; this is on the Tire and Loading sticker on the driver's door jamb and is specific to each truck; look for your number.
I am going to subtract Wife, Kayaks and Racks, a BBQ in the bed, and my WDH weight (it's heavy). Let's call that 500#.
I have 1267-500=767# left for tongue weight.

Now my hypothetical trailer lists a dry weight of 5000# and a dry tongue of 650#. That is 650/5000=13% tongue.
The hypothetical trailer's max weight is 6000# and I will use every pound of that (actually our real-life trailer cargo is about 1100#)
6000*13%=780# loaded tongue.
This is close (13# over payload), so I would possibly investigate further. 13# is not too hard to counteract, say by moving the BBQ to the Trailer instead of the truck bed.

If you are coming up with 200# over on tongue weight, I probably would not buy that trailer.

One other thought. Since your handle says you are a MotoXer, is this a toy hauler? The assumption I make about loading being even does not generally apply to TH's. When you load your toy on the back, all (or most of) that added weight is behind the trailer axle, and it tends actually lighten or severely change that tongue weight percentage. Think of it like a teeter totter missing a kid at one end. In that case, the only way to really know is to find out what the real-world number is; hopefully your dealership will help you figure this out. Use a tongue scale and add heavy salesmen to the back until it is about the weight of the toy you will carry; now you will have a real-world number.
 

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I think the tail would wag the dog. But 40+ years of towing, what would I know... Will it pull it? Yes. Will it stop it? Maybe. What will happen in an emergency situation? I shudder to think.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Okay, so after the math on the new example, I better understand. Lol
I came up with 116 pounds under payload capacity.
All this headache may have me at the dealership for a new Cummins.
 

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Honestly it’s like wanting something really bad that’s 100 dollars and you have 105 left until the end of the month and it’s the 15th. Other bills will be due you know it. Just because you can doesn’t mean you should. I honestly would want a no doubt situation.


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Discussion Starter #11
Well, we ended up finding almost the exact same floor plan on a little more expensive Keystone.
However, it’s 1500 pounds lighter. With a 250 pound lighter tongue weight. I have no doubt in the trucks ability to pull this one.
Thank y’all for yalls help.
 

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Well, we ended up finding almost the exact same floor plan on a little more expensive Keystone.
However, it’s 1500 pounds lighter. With a 250 pound lighter tongue weight. I have no doubt in the trucks ability to pull this one.
Thank y’all for yalls help.
Congrats I’m jealous


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For a comfortable towing experience I like to stay at around 50% of the tow rating. This means being able to go interstate speeds and not feel like you are working hard and getting fatigued just trying to keep the combo between the white lines.
For occasional towing I will allow myself to go up to 80% of the tow rating, but I will ensure my weight distributing hitch setup is spot on with the exact same sag front and rear on the truck and the trailer front and rear the same distance from the road surface.

My last "big" travel trailer was a 30 foot total length trailer with a GVWR of 7000 lbs and a loaded weight of 5800 lbs. The 2000 GMC Sierra had a tow rating of 8000 lbs. That is 83 percent of the tow rating. I was at GVWR of the truck.

I never saw better than 10 mpg and the truck never went into overdrive so I was driving at 3000 RPMs all day long. Even though I had a sway control on the WDH, it was a lot of work when being passed by semi trucks and busses. I could never use the cruise control and just had to never be in a hurry to get anywhere.

You should see if you can do a test tow of the camper and head over to the public scales with your family to see where all the axle weights are at as well as the GVWR of the truck.

My Titan S king cab only had like 300 lbs more payload capacity than my V6 Frontier.

Good Luck.
 

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Hey everyone, title basically states what I’m after. I have a 2018 Nissan Titan 4x4 Crew. It’s not the XD. I’m looking at a camper with an overall length of 32’. It has a dry weight of 6,400 lbs and a GVWR of 8,500 lbs. My Titan is rated at 9,400lbs tow capacity. But is that realistic? I’ve got a Curt 10-15k trunnion weight distribution anti sway hitch and brake controller installed. Is the Titan capable of towing that?
We’ve been searching for months for a trailer and finally found the one we like, so I really hate to tell my wife it’s not in the cards. But I also don’t want to put us in danger either. Anyone got experience with this? What is yalls take? Thanks.

If it matters, 85% of the time I’ll be towing in Texas and the southern states, Florida, Alabama etc. However, I will make my way occasionally north to Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.
I have the exact pickup and tow the exact size of rig with mine, it tows actually pretty well considering the size/weight. I get about 9mpg, and go mostly shorter distances for weekends, etc. And I try to pull it as dry as I can, just to save the weight. But it handles the hills really well, I get some sag in the rear, have considered airbags.
541960


My only hesitation would be the longer trips, we are taking a Utah trip in about 6 months and we'll see how that goes. We are already considering a move to a 2500/250 pickup, but that's because we eventually want a larger rig to pull as well.
 

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I have the exact pickup and tow the exact size of rig with mine, it tows actually pretty well considering the size/weight. I get about 9mpg, and go mostly shorter distances for weekends, etc. And I try to pull it as dry as I can, just to save the weight. But it handles the hills really well, I get some sag in the rear, have considered airbags. View attachment 541960

My only hesitation would be the longer trips, we are taking a Utah trip in about 6 months and we'll see how that goes. We are already considering a move to a 2500/250 pickup, but that's because we eventually want a larger rig to pull as well.
If you are using a properly set up weight distributing hitch you should get exactly the same amount of sag on the front of the truck as the rear. No need for air bags.
 

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I have the exact pickup and tow the exact size of rig with mine, it tows actually pretty well considering the size/weight. I get about 9mpg, and go mostly shorter distances for weekends, etc. And I try to pull it as dry as I can, just to save the weight. But it handles the hills really well, I get some sag in the rear, have considered airbags. View attachment 541960

My only hesitation would be the longer trips, we are taking a Utah trip in about 6 months and we'll see how that goes. We are already considering a move to a 2500/250 pickup, but that's because we eventually want a larger rig to pull as well.
If a 5th Wheel is ever in your future, skip the 250 and go for the 350. Unless it's one of those lightweight trailers, you'll run out of cargo capacity (if you go with the diesel engine) long before you run out of trailer capacity.

The cost difference between an F-250 and and F-350 isn't that much.
 

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Hey everyone, title basically states what I’m after. I have a 2018 Nissan Titan 4x4 Crew. It’s not the XD. I’m looking at a camper with an overall length of 32’. It has a dry weight of 6,400 lbs and a GVWR of 8,500 lbs. My Titan is rated at 9,400lbs tow capacity. But is that realistic? I’ve got a Curt 10-15k trunnion weight distribution anti sway hitch and brake controller installed. Is the Titan capable of towing that?
We’ve been searching for months for a trailer and finally found the one we like, so I really hate to tell my wife it’s not in the cards. But I also don’t want to put us in danger either. Anyone got experience with this? What is yalls take? Thanks.

If it matters, 85% of the time I’ll be towing in Texas and the southern states, Florida, Alabama etc. However, I will make my way occasionally north to Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.
90,000 miles towing 8,500 no problems with equalizer weight distribution hitch
 

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90,000 miles towing 8,500 no problems with equalizer weight distribution hitch
Where? What speeds? What type of trailer? All factors that make a difference. An open trailer hauling slag vs a giant rectangular box travel trailer vs a car hauler vs a sailboat will see vastly different results. Flat terrain verses mountains. Interstates verses back roads.
 

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Where? What speeds? What type of trailer? All factors that make a difference. An open trailer hauling slag vs a giant rectangular box travel trailer vs a car hauler vs a sailboat will see vastly different results. Flat terrain verses mountains. Interstates verses back roads.
27 ft enclosed with race car and golf cart over last 12 years tongue weight 850 lbs
 
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