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Yes they can, but they have to adjust the blades so it cuts less. By less I mean each pass will remove less material than a regular pass on non-slotted/drilled rotor. So they'll make to more passes. Since they're making more passes they'll probably charge you more.
 

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You can not turn crossdrilled rotors. You have to grind them like a clutch fly wheel
 

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I stand corrected. How do you grind them like a clutch? Would most shops have the tool for the job?
 

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HIJACK: (Excellent Technical Thread BTW) When looking at the Drivers side of a Drilled Rotor, should the holes at the top be pointing/leaning/arched forward or backwards? Somebody have the absolute correct answer?

Mine are pointing/arched backwards at the top, but work fine. Thank you. :)
 

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I have been told pointing towards the front by my mechanics but I don't know otherwise.
 

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When I got mine, I misplaced the directions during initial inspection. I rode up to the local Ford dealership and looked over some of the Saleens and other customs, such as Roush and Steeda and they all arched forward. That's the way I set mine, and no problems here. I have seen them arched backwards on a buddy of mine's dragcar but he stated to me that he thought they were backwards but hadn't had time to change them. I honestly don't think it will make THAT big of a difference though, because it stops his dragcar just fine at over 130mph.
 

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The holes are going forward on a cross drilled rotors. To grind them you need to fine a speed shop the has the tool to do it.
 

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the slotts or cross dilled holes face forwards....you can turn the rotors....but takes much time...but it is not recommended
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So...since the overwhelming response seems to be that it's not recommended, would a set of solid rotors turned 2-3 times last as long as slotted (or drilled or drilled/slotted)? In other words, I am looking for good longevity and decent stopping distances, equal to or better than stock. But will last longer than the minuscule 10K miles my now-out-of-warranty-stock rotors have on them. And no, I cannot afford a big brake kit. But the Stillen rotors with metal matrix pads are doable. Or maybe these: http://stores.brakeplanet.com/Items/es23038?
 

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Buy a good set of crossed drilled rotors, they last a long time and give you the best braking power then a regular rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
TitanBlue said:
HIJACK: (Excellent Technical Thread BTW) When looking at the Drivers side of a Drilled Rotor, should the holes at the top be pointing/leaning/arched forward or backwards? Somebody have the absolute correct answer?

Mine are pointing/arched backwards at the top, but work fine. Thank you. :)

Here:

http://www.dba.com.au/2006/QnA/DBA_QnA_22.asp

Also has other good info on the site...
 

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those are slotted rotors not drilled. Drilled are the opposite. I had Brembos on my truck and never had any problems, they make a big differnce in your braking
 

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From am old road racer, cross-drilled rotors are not recommended at ALL except for drag racing. If you go road racing with them, they crack when they overheat.

Cross drilling is neat for looks and for drag racing where a short braking experience is all that is needed. But if real heat dissipation is required, stick with slotted rotors and forego the cross-drilling.

If you tow a heavy trailer and have cross drilled rotors, they WILL crack eventually due to heat-induced stress.

Just my 2-cents worth.

Everyone has their own standards and cross-drilled rotors are fine for people who do not tow or expect a lot of brake performance after the first few hard stops. If I lived in mountains, I'd avoid them like the plague, but desert flatlands might be just fine for them, assuming no heavy towing.
 

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Then why do high performance cars have them. I had crossed drilled on my 2002 durango, made a big differance in that trucks braking. Bear brakes use the crossed drill/slotted combo
 

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GregP said:
From am old road racer, cross-drilled rotors are not recommended at ALL except for drag racing. If you go road racing with them, they crack when they overheat.

Cross drilling is neat for looks and for drag racing where a short braking experience is all that is needed. But if real heat dissipation is required, stick with slotted rotors and forego the cross-drilling.

If you tow a heavy trailer and have cross drilled rotors, they WILL crack eventually due to heat-induced stress.

Just my 2-cents worth.

Everyone has their own standards and cross-drilled rotors are fine for people who do not tow or expect a lot of brake performance after the first few hard stops. If I lived in mountains, I'd avoid them like the plague, but desert flatlands might be just fine for them, assuming no heavy towing.
It may also depend on how they are drilled. When I placed my order, the guy actually called me to learn my needs(I know, I was shocked too!). Once he talked to me, he recommended smaller holes, so that is what I went with. He said that they'd be stronger and less likely to fatigue from heat stress. He may've been blowing smoke up my (.)
 

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Type of steel will have a major impact on how it is affected by the drilling, chamfering may help too.
 

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Go with a good brand like powerslot rotors and put ceramic pads and stainless brake lines....the truck will stop on a dime!
 
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