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Discussion Starter #1
Just had a thought today. I'm debating on what tires to pick up after I ditch the stock crapyears. I was interested in the Nitto Terra Grapplers. I asked for some impressions from you guys and got some good responses. I mentioned that I live up in Buffalo so snow is an issue (okay I know all about the sterotype up here, so you California guys can laugh it up!!lol!). Some said that the TGs weren't that great in the snow. My question is how wide of a tire are you running? A real wide tire (305,315, etc..) traditionally isn't good in the snow no matter what kind of tire it is. I wonder if I went with a narrower width (ie. 275/65/18) if it would improve the handling in the snow. I know tread pattern makes a difference too. What do you think??
 

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not sure someone will chim in though. If ur worried about performance i would stay away from TOYO's though. they are WAY TOO HEAVY and rob performance. It doesnt snow hear so i dont want to give snow tire advice
 

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The way I understand it is what ever weight you add to your tires are wheels multiply that x 10.20 extra pounds per tire being 80 pounds x 10=800.I understand this would be the same as hauling a extra 800 pounds around in the bed of your truck.So yes it would hurt peformance alot.
 

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One thing I've found with tires. If you're going for looks, the versatility will suffer. Big knobby tires are really made for specific reasons. They look cool, but other less aggressive-looking tires are sometimes better for traction in snow. I personally like the Dueler A/T Revos, but I know they're not an aggressive offroad-looking tire. I'd put them up against most any other out there in snow, though. I've yet to have anything that works better in snow on my trucks.
 

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Thats very true. Obviously, the wider you go, the more the tires want to
"float" on top of snow rather than dig in and give traction. But furthermore, the tread design also has allot to do with its overall performance, as well as the weight of the tire itself. In dry weather, it comes close to a draw, because your contact patch has increased, thus more physical rubber is hitting the road, but then it can even out with the weight of the tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input. So, overall, what would you say is a good way to go for my type of driving (decent amount of snow in the winter, a little offroading here and there, and a lot of regular street driving). If possible i'd like something with a little more aggressive look than the stockers.
 

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I'm not going to recommend any specific tire, but I do have a couple of hints.

You might consider getting a second set of rims for winter use. Get the most aggressive snow tires and mount 'em up.

But if you're offroading, all bets are off. You have to buy rubber for the purpose. I know a couple of guys who keep special rubber around just for 'playing in the dirt'. They have crappy steel wheels with good rubber on them and just change over as necessary. If a rim gets dinged up, hey no problem, recycle it and get another one.

If you want performance in 'good weather tires' then take a hint from an old hotrodder and get something that has shorter sidewalls. Width doesn't make so much of a difference unless you're going to extremes. The shorter sidewalls will lower your final-drive ratio and make the truck go even faster. You'll find that it will corner a lot sharper and the brakes will work better, too.

Heh, heh, heh... been there, done that... to my old '89 Grand Wagoneer. Those little ricer boys never knew what hit them...
 
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