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TITANRICK said:
I picked up a set of tires on wheels and will not need them for some time. What is the best way to store them. Thanks much...
The kitchen or living room is more than likely the best place.:lol:

Barrel stacked in a garage or shed should be fine. Just rotate the stack every week or two so the bottom tire doesn't get smashed flat from the weight.
 

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this is great info, as i plan to run my stockers in the winter and store my 20's

i currently have my stock rims and tire barrel stacked, but did not air them up, however due to having to move them from time to time, I have rotated the position they are in the stack
 

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Taken from Hoosier's website:

TIRE STORAGE
The useful life of a tire, whether mounted or dismounted, is directly affected by storage conditions. Tires should always be stored indoors in a dark, cool, dry room.

DO

1 Remove the tires from the vehicle.
2. Remove the air from the tires and store them on their side in a cool/dark/dry environment.
3. Place tires in a black plastic bag when stored during the "off-season".
4. Make sure the temperature range in the storage location is between 40-90 degrees Fahrenheit.

DON'T

1. Don't store tires in direct sunlight or near electric motors. (Electric motors emit small amounts of ozone.) Tires need to be protected from light, especially sunlight. Light causes ultraviolet damage by breaking down the rubber compounds. The storeroom should not contain electrical welding or any other equipment that could produce ozone.

2. Don't apply any chemical treatments to Hoosier tires. (It's not necessary and may actually damage the integrity of the tire by breaking down the rubber properties of the tire.) Tires must not be allowed to come in contact with oils, greases, solvents, or other petroleum products that cause rubber to soften or deteriorate.

3. Don't store tires in sub-freezing temperatures for any length of time. (The rubber can freeze and may crack as a result.)
 

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silverkorn said:
Taken from Hoosier's website:

TIRE STORAGE
The useful life of a tire, whether mounted or dismounted, is directly affected by storage conditions. Tires should always be stored indoors in a dark, cool, dry room.

DO

1 Remove the tires from the vehicle.
2. Remove the air from the tires and store them on their side in a cool/dark/dry environment.
3. Place tires in a black plastic bag when stored during the "off-season".
4. Make sure the temperature range in the storage location is between 40-90 degrees Fahrenheit.

DON'T

1. Don't store tires in direct sunlight or near electric motors. (Electric motors emit small amounts of ozone.) Tires need to be protected from light, especially sunlight. Light causes ultraviolet damage by breaking down the rubber compounds. The storeroom should not contain electrical welding or any other equipment that could produce ozone.

2. Don't apply any chemical treatments to Hoosier tires. (It's not necessary and may actually damage the integrity of the tire by breaking down the rubber properties of the tire.) Tires must not be allowed to come in contact with oils, greases, solvents, or other petroleum products that cause rubber to soften or deteriorate.

3. Don't store tires in sub-freezing temperatures for any length of time. (The rubber can freeze and may crack as a result.)

Yep - I follow these exact recommendations from Hoosier with their slicks. I learned an expensive lesson with my last set of slicks from not storing them properly in the off season. The rubber will dry and harden rapidly if not stored correctly...it's probably not as critical with the high mileage compounds used on the street, but it still applies.
 
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