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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi guys im new here great forumn, just curious my titan le 4wd has the offroad package with the bfg tires im in the repair biz and remember all the problems with pathfinder front ends eating front tires usualy the overly aggresive generals, so ive been watching the tire wear on these bfg,s, ive got 600 miles on my truck and my rear tires are starting to scalop bad , i can see it not just feel it with my hands, my fronts if i run my hand across the tread one way and then reverse i can feel its starting to also chop slightly so this morning i pull up to a guy with an le offroad 4wd and low and behold 2500 miles and his fronts were geting bad , perhaps some of you guys can check and see if your tires are wearing strange use your hand go in both directions if its smooth one way and rough the other we must bring this to nissans attention, remember nissan tried to blame the tire manufactures for the wear problem, tires dont wear bad for nothing its usualy an alignment problem or bad shocks my tires have been checked for proper air pressure and are right were they should be so everyone take a peak, thanks.
 

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slick said:
tires dont wear bad for nothing its usualy an alignment problem or bad shocks my tires have been checked for proper air pressure and are right were they should be so everyone take a peak, thanks.
I doubt that the shocks would be worn out on a new truck. It can also be inherent to the tire design, and can also result from out of balance and/or out of round conditions.

Tire cupping seems to be a common problem with pickups, and not just those from Nissan. If you go to the various truck and RV forums, and do a search for "tire cupping", you will see that the problem affects all truck manufacturers and all tire manufacturers. Once you confirm that alignment and tire balance are correct on a new truck, you next best option is new tires of a different design (from the same or different manufacturer). Or just live with the original tires and rotate them frequently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
outahere said:
I doubt that the shocks would be worn out on a new truck. It can also be inherent to the tire design, and can also result from out of balance and/or out of round conditions.

Tire cupping seems to be a common problem with pickups, and not just those from Nissan. If you go to the various truck and RV forums, and do a search for "tire cupping", you will see that the problem affects all truck manufacturers and all tire manufacturers. Once you confirm that alignment and tire balance are correct on a new truck, you next best option is new tires of a different design (from the same or different manufacturer). Or just live with the original tires and rotate them frequently.

and i agree that the shocks are probably fine, and im well aware of cupping and chopping problems with most suv or pickup trucks, most ford vans and pickup trucks, explorer suffer from these problems but it is not the tires that do it it is the inability to set the right caster camber setting, to avoid such problem several years ago moog starting offering offset upper ball joints for these ford vehicles i have used them many times and since then never had a problem again unless it was due to neglect, you see some manufactures did not provide either enough adjustment or any at all. on some gm vehicles you have to burn out the plates just to acces the caster camber adjustments ive had these trucks in my shop with customers telling me they tried several times to get an alignment only to see no one took the time to do it right, and yes i agree different tires will make some difference but only because it seems a clean road tire that is not agressive just takes alot longer to show signs of problems , by the way my truck has 600 miles im sorry if i had 4 0r 5 thousand maybe id understand and just rotate them more often but 600 no way the guys truck i looked at only had 2500 ,to late to rotate them the damage is allready done, the owners manual tells us to rotate at 7500 miles if i wait that long il need new tires, my point is to let you guys no what i found on my truck because if this is commin maybe we could inform every one to watch and rotate much sooner , the first titan i looked at other than mine also had that problem, there has to others and at 600 miles i have to rotate now
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
slick said:
and i agree that the shocks are probably fine, and im well aware of cupping and chopping problems with most suv or pickup trucks, most ford vans and pickup trucks, explorer suffer from these problems but it is not the tires that do it it is the inability to set the right caster camber setting, to avoid such problem several years ago moog starting offering offset upper ball joints for these ford vehicles i have used them many times and since then never had a problem again unless it was due to neglect, you see some manufactures did not provide either enough adjustment or any at all. on some gm vehicles you have to burn out the plates just to acces the caster camber adjustments ive had these trucks in my shop with customers telling me they tried several times to get an alignment only to see no one took the time to do it right, and yes i agree different tires will make some difference but only because it seems a clean road tire that is not agressive just takes alot longer to show signs of problems , by the way my truck has 600 miles im sorry if i had 4 0r 5 thousand maybe id understand and just rotate them more often but 600 no way the guys truck i looked at only had 2500 ,to late to rotate them the damage is allready done, the owners manual tells us to rotate at 7500 miles if i wait that long il need new tires, my point is to let you guys no what i found on my truck because if this is commin maybe we could inform every one to watch and rotate much sooner , the first titan i looked at other than mine also had that problem, there has to others and at 600 miles i have to rotate now

oh and yes i checked the balance it was perfect
 

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Had this problem with one of the 2 Pathfinders (96) that I leased in the past. Not a problem on the Frontiers I bought (99 & 2002).

Although I did swap out my stock BFG's (on the 2003) for a set of Michelin LTX Pilots and A.R.E. rims at about 8,500 miles. When I know I'm going 4x4ing I switch back to the stock 4 spoke rim and the BFG Rugged Trail T/A's. So I guess I could see the cupping problem you decribed on my Frontier if I put more miles on the BFG's.
 

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just over 5k miles on ours so far without 'odd' wear.

Its probably NOT a balance issue but more so a 'Toe' or 'Camber' issue.

Show the dealer what you have found and have them replace the tires and do a full alignment.

Chris
 

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Have the dealer check the alignment. It's covered for 12 months/ 12 thousand miles.
 

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slick said:
and i agree that the shocks are probably fine, and im well aware of cupping and chopping problems with most suv or pickup trucks, most ford vans and pickup trucks, explorer suffer from these problems but it is not the tires that do it it is the inability to set the right caster camber setting, to avoid such problem several years ago moog starting offering offset upper ball joints for these ford vehicles i have used them many times and since then never had a problem again unless it was due to neglect, you see some manufactures did not provide either enough adjustment or any at all. on some gm vehicles you have to burn out the plates just to acces the caster camber adjustments ive had these trucks in my shop with customers telling me they tried several times to get an alignment only to see no one took the time to do it right, and yes i agree different tires will make some difference but only because it seems a clean road tire that is not agressive just takes alot longer to show signs of problems , by the way my truck has 600 miles im sorry if i had 4 0r 5 thousand maybe id understand and just rotate them more often but 600 no way the guys truck i looked at only had 2500 ,to late to rotate them the damage is allready done, the owners manual tells us to rotate at 7500 miles if i wait that long il need new tires, my point is to let you guys no what i found on my truck because if this is commin maybe we could inform every one to watch and rotate much sooner , the first titan i looked at other than mine also had that problem, there has to others and at 600 miles i have to rotate now
What will you do about cupping on the rear tires, where you have no adustments at all for toe in or camber? There may eventually be aftermarket solutions for the front end, but what about the rear end??? You can do a thrust angle alignment to get the rear axle parallel to the "front axle", but if that does not cure the rear tire scalloping, then what? Seems to me the only option at that point will be tire replacement with a different brand. According to JD Powers, BFG has a very good quality rating with light truck tire consumers, but Michelin is even better.
 

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outahere,

There is a chance of rear tires cupping (Happened on a hardbody I had) but most of the time it is the fronts where the adjustable items are. They did in fact do something with the thrust on the rear of that truck to fix it.

I had the razor trace type of problem he was referring to on his truck on my Z when I put the Z33 wheels on it. Silly me didn't think about alignment on the front when I did so (1.5 inch wider track tires) and within 2k miles I had that 'lumpy' cut on the front tires.

Chris
 
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