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Discussion Starter #1
Currently I have a set of Goodyear Wranglers on the truck, and I was contemplating getting a narrower set of rims and tires for the winter since they do a better job of cutting through the snow to the pavement.

Has anyone done this, and found a wheel/tire combo that worked for them?

I currently am running the 17" stock rims.
 

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Bridgestone Blizzaks will fit the OEM wheels just fine. I run the Toyo ice/snow tires but if I were to do it again I would go with Blizzaks.
 

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I run cooper discovery m+s studded. They are amazing. Stock 20" size. I'm keeping my toyo at2 xtremes on for a while as tire shops here are a zoo right now
 

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I have Blizzaks on OEM 18" wheels, and I love them. They are the same size as the OEM tires were, kinda narrow. Just gotta remember to remove them once temps regularly stay above mid 50's.
 

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I run siped Toyo M/T's year round up here an Alaska and couldn't be happier.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My previous experience with wide tires in the snow, regardless of how much tread was left, was that they tend to ride on top of the snow. Of course narrow tires will cut through the snow to the pavement more efficiently. Has anyone fit a Titan with a dedicated winter set of narrower rims and tires?
 

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Mine are OEM size tires on OEM wheels. Based on how they performed so far I see no reason to try a narrower tire on my Titan.
 

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How much snow are you talking about Jeff? I would agree that thinner tires will aid you in directional stability and traction in light snow or slush, but if you're driving on packed snow or 6" plus deep fresh snow, you probably won't get down to pavement, so there is an advantage to a wider traction patch and a better ability to float on the snow. Also, if you're traveling between snow and dry pavement, the thinner tire will most likely have a taller sidewall with more flex and affect your handling in a bit more negative way. I have lived and driven 4x4 trucks in Alaskan winters for 23+ years and have never gone to a thinner tire or used studs. My opinion is that it is better to just slow down a little and drive in response to the conditions. Also, I believe that siping tires helps quite a bit in icy conditions because there are more edges for grabbing. Just my two cents and I'm sure there are tons of ideas about this.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
How much snow are you talking about Jeff? I would agree that thinner tires will aid you in directional stability and traction in light snow or slush, but if you're driving on packed snow or 6" plus deep fresh snow, you probably won't get down to pavement, so there is an advantage to a wider traction patch and a better ability to float on the snow. Also, if you're traveling between snow and dry pavement, the thinner tire will most likely have a taller sidewall with more flex and affect your handling in a bit more negative way. I have lived and driven 4x4 trucks in Alaskan winters for 23+ years and have never gone to a thinner tire or used studs. My opinion is that it is better to just slow down a little and drive in response to the conditions. Also, I believe that siping tires helps quite a bit in icy conditions because there are more edges for grabbing. Just my two cents and I'm sure there are tons of ideas about this.
Hi Johnny,

I am in upstate NY. Se we get everything from fresh snow on the roads to what is my biggest concern, wet slush, and berms created by our lackluster DOT. The wet slush gives you that directional stability you mentioned, especially when there is anything refreezing on the roads here. They use so much salt, it is a wonder anything is alive come spring alongside the roads. I think anyone here in my area can attest to that.

My previous experience had taught me that big wide tires weren't always great on the snow. In fact, you tend to see more SUVs off the road then FWD sedans when the weather gets bad around here. I am willing to dedicate a specific set of rims and tires just for winter, and considering I am new to the Titan trucks, I wanted to get a consensus on the idea.

As a side question, there is someone local selling rims off of a 2005 Titan. These appear to be a more basic steel rim. I've posted a pic
...think these would fit as well? Have you seen a rim like this? Very different from the stock ones on the truck currently.
 

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Hi Johnny,

I am in upstate NY. Se we get everything from fresh snow on the roads to what is my biggest concern, wet slush, and berms created by our lackluster DOT. The wet slush gives you that directional stability you mentioned, especially when there is anything refreezing on the roads here. They use so much salt, it is a wonder anything is alive come spring alongside the roads. I think anyone here in my area can attest to that.

My previous experience had taught me that big wide tires weren't always great on the snow. In fact, you tend to see more SUVs off the road then FWD sedans when the weather gets bad around here. I am willing to dedicate a specific set of rims and tires just for winter, and considering I am new to the Titan trucks, I wanted to get a consensus on the idea.

As a side question, there is someone local selling rims off of a 2005 Titan. These appear to be a more basic steel rim. I've posted a pic
...think these would fit as well? Have you seen a rim like this? Very different from the stock ones on the truck currently.
As far people being off the side of the road in SUV's... I would bet that has a lot to do with SUV drivers having a false sense of security. They think they're in a tank and don't show the snow/ice its due respect. The FWD car drivers are probably just a little more cautious because they feel (know) they need to be.

IRT the rims, as long as they're off a Titan, they should fit. You can also use Chevy truck 6-lug rims. You'll just have to deal with TPS modules in the tires. Either swap over your current ones or buy new ones and reprogram them each time you swap rims/tires. Or I guess just not worry about it and run with the TPS light on. Probably what I'd do. Good Luck....:big_grin:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The Chevy rims...wonder if the old school steelies will work? That would give me the thin profile I was pondering...
 

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Duratrac's year round, M+S and Snowpeak designated but still great in mud and on trails and I do not have to swap tires or anything.
 

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BFG KO2s. I'm looking forward to the first snowfall so I can go out and act like a fool (safely, of course).
 

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The Chevy rims...wonder if the old school steelies will work? That would give me the thin profile I was pondering...
Yes they will fit.
 

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I just purchased 4 new tires for my truck yesterday -

Bridgestone Dueler H/L ALENZA PLUS (265/70-18) - for $730 installed at Discount Tire and it includes $70 Visa card rebate. Supposedly a 80k mile tire. I can't give a honest review on these yet
 

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My sister ran those on her sequoia and they were only a P rated tire. They drove great. She got less than 50k out of them. Our trucks are not light and will wear out a p rater tire quick.
 
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