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I have a new 2018 Titan V8 with factory tow package and am towing an Outdoors RV 21RD Creekside trailer. It's around 2000lbs under towing capacities for the Titan. We did have the axles "flipped" to increase ground clearance, and honestly right now wish we'd not done that, but...
Many I talk with about their towing experiences tell me "I can't even tell it's there", referring to the trailer when being towed. My experience is quite different, or I'm supersensitive to what's going on. I can definitely tell that the trailer's there, and it isn't a great, or even good, feeling. The trailer doesn't sway or anything like that, but...
My gas mileage non-towing is around 19-20 mpg, while towing is around 8-9 mpg. When I encounter rough riding highways it's not fun. Up-and-down roller-coaster type pavement causes a lot extra movement. I've not done much towing since the late '70's which was an entirely different experience.

Any suggestions, ideas, etc. will be much appreciated!
 

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There are a lot of things that you can do to settle the ride with a trailer.

First, you mentioned an axle flip. Did you raise your trailer ball an appropriate amount to compensate? The trailer frame should be level when hitched for towing. An axle flip will have the trailer nose down if you did not compensate.

Are you using a good weight distributing hitch? If yes, did you set it up properly for/by yourself. Don't trust that an RV dealership has any idea of how to set one up. Mine was installed by the "most experienced" tech at a large RV dealer. He made several errors, one of which actually damaged the unit. It was MUCH better after I set it up and adjusted properly following the manufacturer's directions (and it was a huge change in adjustment from the dealer).

If you are getting porpoising on rough roads, your loading front to back could be imbalanced (light or heavy tongue). Take it to a CAT scale and get proper weights with the rig fully loaded for camping. I try to hit the scale on our "big trip" once a year to make sure everything is within spec. Use the full 3-pass weigh method (should cost about $25) to get the full picture; it's the only way so that there is no guessing at weights. Calculate your numbers, and take a 4th pass if you take some corrective action. Your TW should be 10-15% of overall trailer weight, and all axles on the TT and TV should be below limits.

If all else fails, you can add airbags to the rear axle. I know Air Lift makes them for Titan, others do too I'm sure. Just understand that Air Bags do not increase your carrying capacity, but they will firm up your rear end (well, your trucks rear end). If anything, they actually slightly decrease your carrying capacity as they increase the weight on the rear axle. Basic physics; when the air bag pushes up on the bed and hitch, it also presses down on the tires and axle with an equal and opposite force.
 

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To properly setup your rig / trailer combo for the best ride possible you need access to a nice level parking lot and then a drive to the public scales so you can see how much weight you have on each axle and percent of tongue weight.

When the trailer is hooked up to the truck correctly both the truck and trailer should be sitting level. Also, the weight distributing bars should be parallel to the trailer frame.

You say you are 2000 lbs under towing capacity, but are you really? The tow capacity is based on the particular model truck and usually includes a 150lb driver. Every accessory, passenger, and luggage weight that is added to the truck subtracts from the towing capacity.

When my 2000 GMC Sierra was properly set up to tow my trailer with a GVWR of 7000lbs I was within my tow limits but at the GVWR of the truck. I had to shift some of the items I was carrying in the truck to the trailer.

Once I was set up properly the truck didn't porpoise anymore but I knew the trailer was back there and had to drive accordingly. Then I sold the truck and bought a 2500HD. When pulling the same trailer it was a much more pleasant experience.

My rule of thumb when it comes to towing giant square boxes at highway speed is to try and stay below 51% of the towing capacity.

Before I got the Titan I had a V6 Frontier. Towing my 2500 lb enclosed motorcycle trailer would yield 10 mpg. The Titan gets 13 mpg towing the same load.
 

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Some trailers are light enough that you really don't know they're back there. Some trailers tow so well that they never exhibit problems like sway. An RV trailer is usually big enough that it catches the wind easily and is susceptible to sway. I towed my friends 26' travel trailer last week with my F-350. I had to keep looking back to see if the trailer was still there because the truck acted like it wasn't there. And that was with no WDH in use.

2K under trailer capacity means you're going to know it's there. As stated in both of the above replies, a trip to the CAT scale is in order. You don't KNOW how much weight has been added to the rear axle and how much weight has been removed from the front axle without the printout from the scale.
 

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One additional suggestion for the gas mileage. Do NOT use the cruise control with Tow Mode engaged at interstate speeds. It will severely retard upshifts and your gas mileage will suffer horribly. I generally get 13 mpg towing a 6000 lb loaded trailer at Interstate speeds (65 mph - 110km on 400 series highways here in Canada). I get about 18 mpg towing at state highway speeds (55 mph - 90kph on county highways in Canada). CC doesn't hurt at the lower speeds.
 

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9 MPG sounds about right. My camper is 29' total, and I wouldn't want more. Crosswind and semis whizzing past moves the rig around. Nothing terrifying, but we definitely feel it. Air bags helped a lot on stability, and the weight distributing hitch needs tweaking for the best tow. Keep it out of overdrive at around 60 mph, sit back and take your time is the best advice I can give.
 

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It might be heavier than you think...

Dry Hitch Weight (approx. Lbs.)510 Maximum Trailer Weight - Lbs.6750
 
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