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Discussion Starter #1
The tranny won't shift using the electrical button on the lever.
Research said the wires are too small and stretched to tight so they break.
I had a shop take it apart and fix the wires the best they could so I could use the lower gears for pulling my 5thy wheel down the mountain. It lasted the weekend and then quit again. Does anyone know if there is an upgrade for this problem or have other suggestions. Didn't want to spend $300 for parts and labor if the new part will break also.
Thanks in advance, Rick
 

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Solder a longer wires and wrap them good. It is just one black wire. There are a few threads about this issue.
 

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Thank you for that advice. Can you tell me where I can read more on the treads you said on this subject? I'm not a huge computer techy person so I appreciate any advice on how to find the info. Thx. again
 

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Thank you for that advice. Can you tell me where I can read more on the treads you said on this subject? I'm not a huge computer techy person so I appreciate any advice on how to find the info. Thx. again
Here ya go....

If your manual shift button stops working you may want to look into this.
To inspect your column shift Titan for wire damage/wear….

3 Screws..

Bottom right side.



Bottom left side.




Tab on top left (remove)



Screw under top left tab remove.




Then just pop the bottom down and the top up.. You will have to adjust the tilt on the steering wheel to get the shrouds off but it is quite easy..


Quick shot of the steering column from under and left..



Here is the harness you want to inspect. The black wire is the usual suspect when your “manual shift” stops working..




The infamous black wire sheath.. Notice the wear mark on it?!

I have minimal wear on this loom but I plan on wrapping it in plenty of electical tape to prevent further degredation..







Column shift brake actuator in action…


Column shift in action showing wire/harness travel..



Hope this helps. I dont post much but I try to add quality, not quantity. Please let me know if this helped. A simple thanks keeps me goin.
Kev
 

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Wow, That's a HUGE help. Thanks for taking the time to help me out with this.
I have never had any good results with any other type of forums and I get frustrated and give up. You renewed my faith in these sites.
Thanks again and have an awesome day.
 

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That is some of the best info Ive seen on this site, props to you for that write up!
 

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Hey i have seen that pic on a few different forums, It really helped take the dash off but mine has more than one broken i noticed, all the wires except the yellow one, is there a way to get that wire harness off so i can rewire everything? I tried but it is really stuck on and i don't want to break it, or would if be easier if i buy a new harness if so where can i find them or is there a specific name i am having a hard time finding them, Thanks!
 

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I just fixed this and wanted to leave some notes on how to do it yourself. If you plan on doing this repair then you might want to read this all the way through before starting. Trust me on this.

Cost for repair: $0

Take apart the column covers as previously described.
Locate the wiring harness on the right side side of the column.
To remove the white harness use a pair of needle nose pliers to squeeze the black nipple on the opposite side of the metal bracket the harness is attached to.
Then, used a small common screw driver to wedge between the metal bracket and white plastic wiring harness.
Slowly pry the white wiring harness away from the metal plate. There is a second attachment point posteriorly but it does not require the needle nose pliers.

Now that the white wiring harness is free separate the two halves, basically use a small screw driver to release the latch holding it together.
Move the intact side of the harness out of the way.
On the broken portion, remove the black plastic mounting piece that held the harness to the metal portion of the harness as mentioned about. This slides right off with a screw driver.
There are two rectangular white plastic pieces on the proximal end of the harness (the end with wires hanging out). Carefully remove both. Warning, the plastic is brittle.

I had three broken wires to repair and decided not to solder in extension wire. I may regret that one day. Something to consider at this point.
Identify the number of broken wires.
Look inside the harness and identify each PIN correlating to the broken wires (this is not rocket surgery! If there is a PIN with no wire attached that is one you are after).
With your needle nose pliers gently push the PIN from the inside of the harness out the back side. DO NOT SCREW THIS UP! Bend it, break it, lose it and you are hosed.
With a very small common screw driver pry open the PIN wire clasp for each PIN you removed. This is located at the end of each PIN and is what holds the wire in place.
Set aside your PINS in a very secure place (again, lose it and you are hosed).

aside: Yes, I know I said rocket surgery above. Think about it. It takes 8 years to get a PhD and become a rocket scientist. It takes 13 years to go through undergrad, med school and residency to become a neurosurgeon. But a rocket surgeon? Whoa, that's at least like a million years right?! Back to the project...

Now turn your attention back to the broken wires.
If you plan to solder in extensions to the broken wires do it now.
I will not give instructions on this since I didn't do it (I am firmly regretting that decision at this point) and you have google to look up how to do it. Helpful hint: don't use your solder that you have laying around for your copper pipes. It was not made for electronics.
I digress,
Strip the very ends of the wires.
Place the stripped wire ends into the PIN tips (individually). Then, use your pliers to clasp the ends.
Do this for each broken wire and PIN. Hopefully, you have the same number of each.

Full disclosure:
I probably should have mentioned this next part when you were pulling the PINs out of the harness but I didn't know this either and it worked out just fine for me. If you made it this far you have at least a fighting chance.

Each PIN must now be carefully returned to the correct location in the harness. There is a nice picture in this thread that shows where the wires go and that is what I used. Look at that picture to figure out where your wire/PIN combo must go into the harness.
Now the part you probably would have liked to have known earlier when removing the PINs. They actually have a certain way that they go into the harness. When you look at them you will notice they are asymmetric with a tiny metal tap on one side. You have to put it in the correct way for it to lock in properly. IF YOU GET RESISTANCE YOU ARE DOING IT WRONG! You're smart, figure it out. I did.

Once completed with replacing the PINs you are now ready to reassemble everything in reverse order. Hopefully, everything worked out for you as it did for me.

I would love to tell you I just jumped on this project and completed it in a half hour. That is only partly true. From the time I started with the first screw until I had everything put back together was about a half hour. But, I spent well over a year planning this. Not full time of course, but a little here and there. I shopped for OME replacement parts, used parts and search tons of forums. I found how to rebuild the PIN harness on another classic car form (a Datsun forum I think, whatever happened to Datsun?). I have owned this truck since it was new in 2005, 13 years and still going strong. The manual shift has not worked in at least 4 years and it bugged the heck out of me. Now it works just like new! The funny thing is, I don't think I actually ever used it before and don't see a need in the future. But if I need it, it's there and ready to go.
 
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