Nissan Titan Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,320 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I need to buy a vehicle recovery strap for future mishaps. On Friday, my wife slid backwards down our icy driveway and ended up on the top of a snowbank. I also think my blizzard white truck in a snow storm freaked out a on-coming soccer mom van as I watched plow into a ditch (I did have my lights on).

So here is my question. I am interested in a receiver hitch d-ring bracket that fits into the OEM receiver (see picture). It seems to provide an easy and centered mount for my end of the strap rather than snake it around the receiver or frame and worry about the strap getting cut by the bumper.

From what I have read, it looks like I should use the loop type straps. The question is what load rating to get and length? Do I want the break strength to be the max tow rating of the truck? Or do I want to get a strap that is rated for the vehicle weight that I will be pulling even though the break strength will be 2x or 3x that rating. Or, do I want a strap that that is rated under the capacity of the receiver or the receiver hitch d-ring bracket? The capacity of the receiver hitch d-ring bracket is 10,000 lbs.

Also, does anyone have a picture of how these straps are looped? I an not 100% clear what is meant by the figure 8 pattern and wooden stick referenced by one manufacturer.

Pass the straps through each other in a figure 8 pattern and put a wood stick or rolled up magazine in between them so you can take them apart when your done. The Web Sling Association and the Federal D.O.T. require the Working Load Limit to be 1/3 of the Rated Break Capacity.



Thanks for your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,754 Posts
I just bought a strap from acadamey, it is a yellow strap. I usually wrap around the thing I am trying to pull, then pull the strap through the loop in the end of the strap. Then I just put the other end loop around my trailer ball. Never had any trouble, I think I have a 10k lbs strap. It has held my truck back on more than one occasion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Not sure what load rating to get, I would just go with the heaviest you can find. As far as length goes, you will find that one size rarely works for all situations. You may find the recovery vehicle lines up in a ditch, water or deep mud with a certain length. It is good to have at least two different sizes. Maybe a 20' and a 30'. That way you have 20', 30' and 50' of length to get the recovery vehicle where you need it. The figure 8 is used when you combine two straps together. If you do not have something in between the connections of the two straps they will tighten up so tight that you will not be able to get them apart.
It is hard to explain in words, but I will try. Let's say you have two straps, a red one and a blue one. You put one end of the blue onto the recovery vehicle and then you thread the red strap through the other loop on the blue strap (like threading a needle, the loop on the blue is the needle and the red is the thread). You then take the far end of the red strap and run it through the first loop of the red strap this will link them together giving you one long strap. If you do not have anything, like a stick or mag, between them they will form a very tight knot from all of the pulling force. Hope I did not confuse you any further.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,320 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Highland brand straps warn of using the ball mount which is why I am considering this solution Do not use your hitch ball to snatch a disabled vehicle. The force generated when the strap is under load could detach the ball and turn it into a lethal projectile. Use frame members or towing points such as tow hooks that are rated for the job.Then again, you would think a D-ring would pose the same hazard. This is where I am confused. Because of the way recovery straps work, they stretch and then collapse. The forces in this action may exceed the hardware ratings. So would I want to use a strap with a break point at the load limit of the hardware?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Make sure you get a strap that is specificaly made for recovery. you do not want a tow strap for getting a vehicle unstuck. Stay away from chains. Make sure you place a heavy wet towel or jacket a couple of freet from each end of the strap. This is important because if the strap breaks, it will fly back like a rubber band, the towel will push the strap down faster and help limit horizontal movement. Even though the Titan can pull some heavy weight, you have to be very careful and as safe as possible. Check this out and you will see what I mean. http://www.offroaders.com/tech/Recovery-Strap-Accident.htm

Here is a good site for some general info... http://www.offroaders.com/tech/Tow_Straps.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
MuskyHunter said:
Highland brand straps warn of using the ball mount which is why I am considering this solution Do not use your hitch ball to snatch a disabled vehicle. The force generated when the strap is under load could detach the ball and turn it into a lethal projectile. Use frame members or towing points such as tow hooks that are rated for the job.Then again, you would think a D-ring would pose the same hazard. This is where I am confused. Because of the way recovery straps work, they stretch and then collapse. The forces in this action may exceed the hardware ratings. So would I want to use a strap with a break point at the load limit of the hardware?

Never use the hitch ball for recovery. I would also never use the front tow hooks on a Titan to pull another vehicle. As far as the load rating, I cannot help you. You should be able to find some recommendations on the web. I make it a practice to only help friends and family with vehicle recovery. It is sad:crying: , but due to law suits and the high risk for property damage and injury, I would rather not take that chance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
"Do not use your hitch ball to snatch a disabled vehicle. The force generated when the strap is under load could detach the ball and turn it into a lethal projectile. Use frame members or towing points such as tow hooks that are rated for the job.Then again, you would think a D-ring would pose the same hazard"

That is why you drape a towel or similar object on each end of the strap.This helps minimize the possibility of the broken strap and the objects they are attached to from becoming a missile. You always run that risk, and many others, when recovering stuck vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,320 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info, I did see that. I would not consider a chain or a tow strap with hooks. This is in part where my question lies. If the D-ring is rated to 10,000 lbs, do I want to choose a strap with a break point of 10,000 lbs so as not to exceed the rating of the hitch and D-ring, or choose a strap with a 20,000 break point that has a tow rating of 10,000 lbs.

Or to be safer, choose a strap with either it's break point or tow rating lower than the rating of the receiver or tow rating of the truck, provided that rating is high enough to pull the target vehicle. I haven't found any information concerning how to match the strap with the receiver or receiver D-ring rating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,373 Posts
Things turned left somewhere...

Using your trailer receiver is the best place to attach a strap from the rear of your Titan. The tow strap adapter and screw pin shackle shown are strong enough to hold 5 Titans!!

The last time I did the math for a .625" dia grade 5 pin in double shear it came out to about 60,000 lbs!

I use a 30 ft by 3" wide strap rated for 30,000 lbs, I think a common size carried by many off-road guys.

I always try to pull someone out backwards if possible to use both of the trucks hitches. I wouldn't trust the strap to just stay on the hitch ball. I remove the slide in hitch(if there is one) and insert the loop of the strap into the receiver and put the hitch pin thru the loop.
I would stay away from using our front hooks to pull others out(as already posted) but would use BOTH of them if possible to have someone else tow me out if I needed to go forewards.

I second the motion of not using tow straps with hooks for "snatching"...They WILL break.

Using the above strap and hook up method I've pulled out a 30 ft motorhome that had sank overnight to it's frame with my 98' Ford Ranger 2wd. It took a total of 5 "snatches" to get it entirely free.
I just love saying the word "snatch"...


Keep your strap dry, and out of the sun and it will last...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Get a crane strap then you'll never have to worry about breaking it. Or atleast I've never seen one broken and I've seen some serious trucks get stuck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,373 Posts
Get a crane strap then you'll never have to worry about breaking it. Or atleast I've never seen one broken and I've seen some serious trucks get stuck.
Although I'm sure you're right they won't break, you do want some stretch, that's what really does the work when "snatching"...

If you are doing a straight pull, then yeah you don't need a strap to stretch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,754 Posts
I know the hitch is only rated for10k lbs, but that is for the loads generated during towing. Do you really think the hitch is going to break before a any strap that you can carry is going to break? There is no way in hell that a 10, or even a 20k lb strap is going to break the tow hitch. Come on guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
I bought a 25' XD Recovery Strap from OK offroad (www.okoffroad.com) a few
years back for pulling/getting myself pulled out of the sand. It is rated at 30k and was recommended instead of rope or chains. I also have a D-ring hitch as shown above (which was also recommended by a couple of offroaders who have buried their jeeps up to the wheels in sand).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Use a strap rated for ATLEAST 3 times the weight of the vehicles- I wouldn't think of anything under 20,000lb- preferably 30k to be safe.

I do the same thing Lou suggested- put the strap into the reciever and stick the pin through the loop.


And just to clarify- using chain isn't as dangerous as people make it out to be- provided you use the right type of chain.
5/16th Grade 70 chain has a working load limit of somewhere around 20000lbs- you'll rip the tow points off before the chain ever fails.

And chain will NOT recoil like a strap does if it does break- for one thing it does not stretch so it does not have the stored potential energy a strap does. And secondly- each link will absorb energy if the chain fails- between that and the weight of a chain- it's not going to go whipping around like a strap would.

Regardless of what you use- the most important thing is to use your head- recovery is dangerous period- no matter what precautions you take **** can go wrong. If you think you're in above your head- just pay and get a wrecker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
helomech said:
I know the hitch is only rated for10k lbs, but that is for the loads generated during towing. Do you really think the hitch is going to break before a any strap that you can carry is going to break? There is no way in hell that a 10, or even a 20k lb strap is going to break the tow hitch. Come on guys.
I agree- you're more likely to be busting axle shafts and stripping teeth off the gears before ever ripping off the hitch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,320 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Yeah, that was puzzling to me. If the ball can tow a 10,000 lb trailer then why cant you use it for the strap? Then again, it may just be a liability disclaimer for the strap manufacturer. In both the hitch ball and D-ring, it would seem there is enough metal to handle the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,754 Posts
MuskyHunter said:
Yeah, that was puzzling to me. If the ball can tow a 10,000 lb trailer then why cant you use it for the strap? Then again, it may just be a liability disclaimer for the strap manufacturer. In both the hitch ball and D-ring, it would seem there is enough metal to handle the job.
I have used the hitch ball many times, and never had any trouble. There is no way that the strap will slid over the ball.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
MuskyHunter said:
Yeah, that was puzzling to me. If the ball can tow a 10,000 lb trailer then why cant you use it for the strap? Then again, it may just be a liability disclaimer for the strap manufacturer. In both the hitch ball and D-ring, it would seem there is enough metal to handle the job.
They are referring to using the hitch with the ball and mount removed. Put the loop of the strap in the square receiver hole and slide the pin in the loop. The ball is the weak point of the chain when it comes to towing. If you look at most tow balls, the oem Nissan included, it is only rated for 5000 lbs tow limit. Never use the ball for recovery, you are just asking for trouble. Any reputable off road web site will tell you this. I think it has something to do hardness of the steel. I would go with the D ring you mentioned in the opening post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,754 Posts
2007 TITAN LE said:
They are referring to using the hitch with the ball and mount removed. Put the loop of the strap in the square receiver hole and slide the pin in the loop. The ball is the weak point of the chain when it comes to towing. If you look at most tow balls, the oem Nissan included, it is only rated for 5000 lbs tow limit. Never use the ball for recovery, you are just asking for trouble. Any reputable off road web site will tell you this. I think it has something to do hardness of the steel. I would go with the D ring you mentioned in the opening post.
The ball I am using is rated at 10k lbs, but even a factroy ball is way stronger than the strap. You have to look at the forces put on a ball when towing. They are rated to have a constant pull of 5, or 10k lbs. But when you are towing the loads get MUCH higher. For example when towing a 5k lb trailer if you where to slam on the brakes at 65 mph the 5k lb would increase expotentially. There is no way a 20k lbs tow strap is going to break a stud that is almost an inch thick. Just think about it. I don't believe the titan can put enough force to the ground to break a trailer ball, unless you are really jerking the hell out of it. Even then, I think you would break something else first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
MuskyHunter said:
Yeah, that was puzzling to me. If the ball can tow a 10,000 lb trailer then why cant you use it for the strap? Then again, it may just be a liability disclaimer for the strap manufacturer. In both the hitch ball and D-ring, it would seem there is enough metal to handle the job.
The danger is in the strap slipping off the ball.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top