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Discussion Starter #1
For all those who are wondering what the Banks sounds like, here's a video of how my Titan sounded with the Banks on. This was taken the day I traded it in and it didn't have the Volant CAI on it anymore, also the muffler was burnt out so the sound isn't as great as it used to be.

For those who are thinking of buying a Banks I would have to say it really is a great sounding exhaust, very deep, throaty, and enjoyably loud, especially under WOT. Only downside is with allot of racing the muffler could burn up and need to be replaced, so keep the reciept since they are warrantied for life. If the muffler burns you simply send the old one back and they send you a new one, which gives a good excuse to run the truck with just the Banks Y-pipe on and open after the collector in the Y-pipe. It's easily twice as loud as the full Banks exhaust, and a blast when driving around, WOT is LOUD.
 

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WOW, I had to play that over and over. You may have convinced me to go with Banks but I was thinking of keeping my stock 07 dual exhaust with 2 Banks mufflers and exit on the same side. Anyone here object or any reasons why I shouldn't do this? Anyone think that it would be too open and not have enough back pressure, cause I know you need some back pressure to have like a scavaging effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
pogi69x said:
WOW, I had to play that over and over. You may have convinced me to go with Banks but I was thinking of keeping my stock 07 dual exhaust with 2 Banks mufflers and exit on the same side. Anyone here object or any reasons why I shouldn't do this? Anyone think that it would be too open and not have enough back pressure, cause I know you need some back pressure to have like a scavaging effect.
It's all about exhaust velocity, you don't want back pressure, going too big on the pipes or having too much bends in the pipes will make your exhaust velocity slow down, that's when your gonna loose low end. The scavenging effect is a result of a properly set up exhaust manifold/header taking advantage of the high pressure area in front and the low pressure area behind the exhaust pulses. By making them merge and cross at the perfect spots, one pulse's low pressure area behind it will help pull (vacuum) the next pulse through. Therefore helping the exhaust exit the combustion chamber, and in some applications help pull the intake air into the combustion chamber during overlap. That's the scavenging effect, backpressure is bad, exhaust velocity is vital. In order to keep the exhaust velocity at the optimum flow you have to have the correct size piping, also how the piping is set up i.e. single, dualls, x-pipe, h-pipe will factor in too. Some drag racers set up dualls with the x-pipe to help with the scavenging effect, since you can use x-pipe once again to take advantage of the exhaust pulses and thier high and low pressure areas infront and behind them. It's good to have an overall goal in mind of how you want your exhaust to be.

Hope that helps.
 
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