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Don't laugh at a guy who has never owned a truck before! :)

What is the advantage of owning the Titan with the electronic locking rear differential? What basically does it do?

Talk about feeling likea geek! LOL!
 

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Bmosbacker said:
Don't laugh at a guy who has never owned a truck before! :)

What is the advantage of owning the Titan with the electronic locking rear differential? What basically does it do?

Talk about feeling likea geek! LOL!
In low traction offroad situations (e.g. mud, snow, sand) it insures that you get torque to both rear wheels. It eliminates the common occurence of one wheel spinning and the truck not moving. It is driver controlled, from a switch on the dash.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
outahere said:
In low traction offroad situations (e.g. mud, snow, sand) it insures that you get torque to both rear wheels. It eliminates the common occurence of one wheel spinning and the truck not moving. It is driver controlled, from a switch on the dash.
Is it similar to the traction control on my Acura TL (I have a swith that I can either leave on or off). I'm guessing this is the same concept?

Thanks.
 

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Bmosbacker said:
Is it similar to the traction control on my Acura TL (I have a swith that I can either leave on or off). I'm guessing this is the same concept?
Thanks.
not really, the traction control in your TL uses the ABS wheel sensors to detect wheel slip at either of
the front wheels & then if this occurs it reduces the power from the engine
(retards the ignition timing, reduce fuel, and even apply the brake to either or both wheels)

Nissan's active brake limited slip is similiar to what you Acura has

a limited slip differential (LSD) & a locking differential are also different animals
(there is also an open diffential option)

these use different mechanisms to more efficiently apply power(torque) to the wheel(s) with traction, by using cluthces,planetary gearsets, viscous fluid couplings , hydraulics & now even elctronics

a LSD is good for putting power to the ground on low traction roads & a locking diff excels off-road

LSD's where uncommon on FWD cars until a few years ago and Nissan pioneered there use
with the '92 SE-R, '92 Stanza SE & subsequent Maximas & I30's with a Viscous LSD,

Quaife makes another common LSD for FWD cars that uses clutch packs I think

Torsen, Auburn, Detroit & others are known for RWD LSD's
(GM's was PosiTrac right?, what was Ford's)

more detailed information here :)

www.worldoffroad.com/begin/begdiff.asp

www.chrismans.com/AskSpankyDiff.html
 

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Electronic Diff in 4WD

So tell me,

If you have your truck in 4 wheel drive, and you don't have the electroni differential, aren't all 4 wheels going to turn anyway?
 

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dd564 said:
So tell me,

If you have your truck in 4 wheel drive, and you don't have the electroni differential, aren't all 4 wheels going to turn anyway?
At least one wheel in the front, and one wheel in the back will turn, assuming open differentials and Nissan's ABLS are present. Under adverse conditions, 2WD is effectively 1WD, and 4WD is effectively 2WD
 

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dd564 said:
So tell me,
If you have your truck in 4 wheel drive, and you don't have the electroni differential, aren't all 4 wheels going to turn anyway?
this may help:

What is four wheel drive?

As part of our guide for the beginner in the world of off roading we examine some of the basic concepts.

Everyone is aware of four wheel drive vehicles and they certainly have been the boom vehicle of the nineties, but how many people actually understand how four wheel drive works? Four wheel drives are generally characterised by a plethora of extra gear levers and switches many of which are a complete mystery to many drivers. How many people have seen expensive four wheel drive vehicles floundering in wet grass fields? This is usually due to a complete lack of understanding on how the vehicle works. This article will aim to resolve many questions and facilitate the reader to make an informed decision on four wheel dive systems. Most four wheel drive vehicles are in their road format actually only one wheel drive. This is because all road vehicles are fitted with a device called a differential (or diff for short). Diffs are essential in any vehicle for going round corners. When a vehicle goes round a corner the outside wheel must travel much further than the inside wheel, the diff allows this to happen. However the diff is a very lazy piece of engineering and generally hates working.

Effectively the diff will transmit the engine power to the easiest way possible. So if for example in a two wheel drive car one driving wheel is on dry tarmac and the other is on sheet ice. The power to the wheels will take the path of least resistance and the car will be left stationary with one wheel spinning on the ice. Not generally useful if you are trying to get somewhere

Most Japanese four wheel drives and early Land Rovers (pre 1983) utilise two wheel drive for the road and the driver can select four wheel drive for off road conditions. In these vehicles when the four wheel drive lever is engaged the front and rear axles are joined together and thus make power available to all four wheels, hence four wheel drive (astounding!!). Unfortunately Mr. Differential can be found in both front and rear axles and, as previously discussed, is still a very lazy person.

Consequently if we take the previous example of ice and tarmac and in this case both wheels on the left hand side of the car are on the ice while the right hand side is on good tractive tarmac. Four wheel drive is selected yet all that happens is that the left hand wheels spin and the vehicle remains where it is.

This is because the diff in the front is sending the power to the easiest route as is the one in the back axle. Thus our four wheel drive is in fact only two wheel drive.

Now if our situation had improved a little and only one of rear wheels was on the ice things would be a little different. In two wheel drive mode we would be sat with one wheel spinning ineffectually, so being bright people we select four wheel drive and as if by magic our vehicle would be propelled forward. But how?

Effectively what is happening is that the front axle is dragging the car along as this has adequate traction to both wheels. Thus all four wheel drive means is that you can afford to lose traction to only one wheel - disappointing isn't it.

Consequently Mr. Differential also has to be present in the middle. Now we have three diffs in the vehicle and all of them are idle and lazy. Each one wants to transmit the power the easiest way. Each axle wants to transmit the power to the easiest wheel and the middle or centre diff wants to transmit the power to the easiest axle. Consequently we end up with one wheel drive. Back to our previous ice and tarmac example and this time we assume that one rear wheel is on ice and the other three are on tarmac. The rear axle diff wants to send all of its power to the wheel on the ice and the centre diff wants to transmit all the power to the rear axle, thus the rear wheel on the ice spins and the vehicle goes nowhere. At this point we introduce the Differential Lock. Effectively the Diff Lock eliminates the diff from the equation, the centre diff ceases to work and becomes a solid device that transmits equal power to both front and rear axles. We are now in the same situation as described above with four wheel drive.

borrowed from here: www.worldoffroad.com/begin/beg4x4.asp
 

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Great Post!
So my question is, can I only get a locking Diff in 4 wheel drive or is this option going to be also for 2 wheel drive. I want to be able to lock the rear to get posi traction in the snow. I understand it can't always be locked for turning corners on dry pavement, other wise it will have the tendency to skip.

:jester:
 

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pyromedic said:
Great Post!
So my question is, can I only get a locking Diff in 4 wheel drive or is this option going to be also for 2 wheel drive. I want to be able to lock the rear to get posi traction in the snow. I understand it can't always be locked for turning corners on dry pavement, other wise it will have the tendency to skip.

:jester:
One more question, so the trucks without the soon to arrive "Electronic Locking" are the only one's that lock? Is there not a clutch of some sort that will recognize a spinning tire on a two wheel drive, that will cause it to switch to the other wheel? (Like on a Chevy?) Those trucks don't have Electronic locking, but it will switch to the other wheel if one is spinning too much.
 

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In a reply to my other post, someone mentioned april or may on the E-lock diff, is there any official word from nissan national on this? I had a dealer in florida i was talking to call his regional zone office last week and was told that they had no idea when the LRD would be available.

Has anyone heard a reason for the delay?
 

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pyromedic said:
Great Post!
So my question is, can I only get a locking Diff in 4 wheel drive or is this option going to be also for 2 wheel drive. I want to be able to lock the rear to get posi traction in the snow. I understand it can't always be locked for turning corners on dry pavement, other wise it will have the tendency to skip.

:jester:
again, anyone know if the push button locking diff will be available for 2 wheel drive or is it just for 4X4.
 

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At the Nissan web site, the locking diff is shown as part of the offroad (OR) package only, and not as a stand alone option. Is the OR package available on the 2WD? If so, then the locking diff will be available for 2WD.
 

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outahere said:
At the Nissan web site, the locking diff is shown as part of the offroad (OR) package only, and not as a stand alone option. Is the OR package available on the 2WD? If so, then the locking diff will be available for 2WD.
looks like a 2WD SE will be available with the Offroad Package & Locking Diff

www.nissanusa.com

Off-Road Package
XE 4x4, SE 4x2 and 4x4, LE 4x4

• Rancho® shocks
• Lower final gear ratio (3.36:1); similar to a four-speed automatic 4.10:1
• 17" x 7.5" Aluminum-alloy wheels
• P285/70R17 B.F. Goodrich® Rugged Trail® OWL tires
• Skid plates - oil pan (4x2), transfer case (4x4), lower radiator (4x2 and 4x4)
• Fog lights (standard on LE)
• Active Brake Limited-slip (standard on all 4x4 models)
• Tow hooks (standard on all 4x4 models)
• Electronic locking differential (late availability)


you might also surf www.nissannews.com

and www.freshalloy.com for more Nissan info.

EDITED to add:
if you go to the NissanNews web site & click on pricing, it opens a PDF file that lists pricing for all the model variants & options, it lists the Offroad Package as available on the 4wd XE/SE/LE & the 2wd SE but there is a note stating the locking diff is only available on the 4x4 models
FWIW :)
 

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elect.lock availability

Don't know if you can really count on this, but this is the email that I received from Nissan on availability time for electronic shifting differential lock.

Thank you for taking the time to personally contact us about your interest in Nissan products.


Currently, the Electronic Locking Differential is scheduled to begin production on April 4, 2004. For more information regarding the Nissan Titan, please visit the website listed below as it has the most up to date information.


We hope that this information answers your question, but if you need any additional information or have further questions, please let us know by reply e-mail or by calling 1-800-647-7263 and pressing "0" for a live operator.


Also, make sure to take a look at our website, www.NissanUSA.com, for the most up-to-date product information.


At Nissan, we are committed to a high level of customer service.


Sincerely,


Nissan North America
 

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locking diff

I still have to wait a couple of more weeks for mine to come in until then, can someone tell me what the difference is between a locking differential and the traction control that comes with the tow package? It sounds similar to what the traction control does in my car, but I'm not sure. I know the locking diff won't be available until April 4th, but I know no idea what the diffence is between that and traction control.
 

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COHawk said:
I still have to wait a couple of more weeks for mine to come in until then, can someone tell me what the difference is between a locking differential and the traction control that comes with the tow package? It sounds similar to what the traction control does in my car, but I'm not sure. I know the locking diff won't be available until April 4th, but I know no idea what the diffence is between that and traction control.
take a look here:http://titantalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8897
 

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The electronic locking differential is used in low range 4 wheel drive only. It manually locks the rear axles to together so that one side can't spin without the other side spinning. It is not used at higher speeds because it would make steering difficult with both back wheels turning at the same speed. The traction control can operate at all speeds....It simply pulses the brake on the wheel that is spinning to force the other wheel to turn.
 

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Snowman had posted this link in another thread,

snowman said:
Your rear axle is a dana 44.. very common and strong American made rear axle... www.tractech.com/
Call these people to see if they make one for your Titan...

Differentials- What Are They?

In powered axles, gears that deliver power from the drive shaft to the left and right axle half - shafts separately

Allow the left and right wheels to turn at different road speeds when turning, so that neither wheel has to scuff

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Differentials and Traction Control

Conventional "open" differentials tend to equalize the power delivered through both wheels. Thus if one wheel loses traction - "spins out" on snow, mud, sand, or gravel - it delivers very little power to the ground. The other wheel will deliver only the same very little power. Often this is not enough to keep the vehicle moving on - it's stuck.

Traction control differentials allow the wheel with traction to deliver more power than the wheel without traction. Often this is enough to keep the vehicle moving. There are two types of traction control differentials:

Locking

Limited Slip
Each type has advantages for specific types of vehicles and driving conditions.


a little more basic info. about the different aftermarket diffs they offer on is on the site

FWIW :cheers:
 
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