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Discussion Starter #1
So who's done it?
My manual says to do it at 30,000 miles, but the dealers menu for 30,000 doesn't have it. Called up Jiffy Lube -they told me even for harsh driving it doesn't need a tranny service at 30,000

Anyways i bought the ESM and it says this:

ARevision: April 2004 2004 Titan
A/T FLUID PFP:KLE40
Changing A/T Fluid UCS002MN
1. Increase ATF oil temperature to 80C (176F) once.
2. Stop engine.
3. Remove the tightening bolt for ATF level gauge.
4. Drain ATF from drain plug and refill with new ATF. Always refill same volume with drained fluid.
_ To replace the ATF, pour in new fluid at the charging pipe with the engine idling and at the same time
drain the old fluid from the radiator cooler hose return side.
_ When the color of the fluid coming out is about the same as the color of the new fluid, the replacement
is complete. The amount of new transmission fluid to use should be 30 to 50% increase of the stipulated
amount.
CAUTION:
_ Use only Genuine NISSAN ATF Matic Fluid J. Do not mix with other fluid.
_ Using automatic transmission fluid other than Genuine NISSAN ATF Matic Fluid J will cause
deterioration in driveability and automatic transmission durability, and may damage the automatic
transmission, which is not covered by the warranty.
_ When filling ATF, take care not to splash ATF on heat generating parts such as exhaust.
_ Do not reuse drain plug gasket.
5. Increase ATF oil temperature to 80C (176F) once.
6. Check fluid level and condition. Refer to MA-21, "Checking A/T Fluid" . If fluid is still dirty, repeat step 2.
through 5.
7. Install the removed ATF level gauge in the fluid charging pipe.
8. Tighten the level gauge bolt.
Checking A/T Fluid UCS002MO
1. Warm up engine.
2. Check for fluid leakage.
3. Remove the tightening bolt for ATF level gauge.
4. Before driving, fluid level can be checked at fluid temperatures of 30to 50C (86to 122F) using
“COLD” range on ATF level gauge as follows.
a. Park vehicle on level surface and set parking brake.
b. Start engine and move selector lever through each gear position. Leave selector lever in “P” position.
c. Check fluid level with engine idling.
d. Remove ATF level gauge and wipe clean with lint-free paper.
CAUTION:
When wiping away the fluid level gauge, always use lint-free paper, not a cloth one.
e. Re-insert ATF level gauge into charging pipe as far as it will go.
CAUTION:
To check fluid level, insert the ATF level gauge until the cap contacts the end of the charging pipe,
with the gauge reversed from the normal attachment conditions.
f. Remove ATF level gauge and note reading. If reading is at low side of range, add fluid to the charging
pipe.
CAUTION:
Do not overfill.
5. Increase ATF oil temperature to 80C (176F) once.
ATF: NISSAN Matic Fluid J
Fluid capacity: 10.6 (11-1/4 US qt, 9-3/8 lmp qt)
Drain plug: : 34 N•m (3.5 kg-m, 25 ft-lb)
Level gauge bolt: : 5.1 N•m (0.52 kg-m, 45 in-lb)


So for those who've done it, how difficult is it? Can i or should i do it?
Thanks in advance!
 

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I did it myself in my driveway. I also added a remote mount filter at the same time.

The fluid was a little dirty at 15,000 miles. The Titan uses a mesh screen for the "filter". Basically it only removes larger particles.
 

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I had it done with the pump/ flushing machine and had them put synthetic in. OH MY GOSH what a difference!!!!!!! shifts better and overdrive is drops in like a charm.. I had 35000 on the truck and figured it was time. The old stuff looked pretty burnt.
Highly recommend the pump and Synthetic...
 

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RW1050 said:
I had it done with the pump/ flushing machine and had them put synthetic in. OH MY GOSH what a difference!!!!!!! shifts better and overdrive is drops in like a charm.. I had 35000 on the truck and figured it was time. The old stuff looked pretty burnt.
Highly recommend the pump and Synthetic...
What fluid did you use if you put synthetic in it??
 

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Jim Truett said:
I did it myself in my driveway. I also added a remote mount filter at the same time.

Where is the "radiator cooler hose return side" that you are suppose to drain it from? Is there a diagram or pic somewhere?

And when you go to do it yourself how many quarts of trans fluid do you need? 15?

From my understanding these are the basic steps to a flush and please correct me if I'm wrong
1. Warm engine to operating temp
2. Drain 4 qts from tranny pan
3. Put back drain bolt and Replace 4 qts
4.Add in 30% more than capacity to charging pipe while engine is idling while draining fluid from the "radiator cooler hose return side" or auxilliary trans oil cooler hose return line until fluid is clean. (? How fast does the fluid come out of the lines?)

If there is a writeup on this please direct me as I couldn't find it, it seem straight forward. Help me save $200 from the stealer. On a side note the j matic fluid is $$$ - $10 a qt!!!!
 

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Hmmmmmmmm, I'm waiting till 60k to do anything to the tranny. Then I'll be good for another 60k. Don't believe everything you read in the manual.
 

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Wiscdave said:
Hmmmmmmmm, I'm waiting till 60k to do anything to the tranny. Then I'll be good for another 60k. Don't believe everything you read in the manual.
Just looking to be safe, I just bought the truck used w/ 50K on it. Peace of mind is what I'm looking for
 

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I'm at 30,000, I'll get mine done in the fall just before it becomes my daily driver again, or maybe sooner as I have a couple of events I have to tow too.

My situation is a little unique because in the 1st 5,000 miles of ownership my truck leaked so bad it was constantly at the dealer for tranny/transfer case work and I know they put lots of fluid in it dureing all these visits, I even think they did a full flush once but never documented it to me.
 

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Great info, I was wanting to tackle it myself and was looking at using Royal Purple for tranny and rear end. I have around 26XXX miles now and almost everyday I engage my 4x4 because where I live, would it be detrimental to the trans. if I use this? I don't have a trans gauge on my dash so I can imagine my setup is a little different. This Royal Purple is like $11 here so would really be worth the extra money?
 

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I waited until 90k to have the stealership flush mine and it needed it! Not long before the flush, I was towing a load around 2k lbs at a low speed for about 2 hrs (bad traffic) when I went to take off from a light the tranny started slippin' ! man I was pissed. I pulled over and shut her off for 20 minutes and then she ran fine. All I can say about the stealership is :futwice: make shure when you go in for a recommended service you point out EVERYTHING you want done. I told them the 90k service and even left the manual out on the center console as a reverance for the mechanic. They don't do half the stuff recommended by the manual.:readclose needless to say, all dealerships have a differant criteria for the recommended services. watch out there are alot of extra charges....90k service = $720 tax included:wtf:
 

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most of that stuff you can do your self... I have changed the fluid in many of my automatic transmissions before and while i havent crawled up under my titan yet, i cant foresee it to be too much different. i have heard pros and cons about the flush method of fluid change but have never had it done myself. the external filter does sound like a good idea though....
 

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I use Amsoil ATF. It is compatible with Nissan J and will not, and CAN NOT void your warranty. Nissan can not make your use their ATF fluid. Amsoil ATF exceeds the Nissan J. Nissan would have to prove that the failure was caused by the Amsoil ATF. And if that was the case Amsoil would pay for the Transmissions. Nissan, like many other dealers try to scare you into buying their products. If you read carefully on your owners manual you will find the words " Suggested use".

I do a complete flush and filter change. Changing only 4 quarts at a time dilutes your good fresh fluid with bad dirty fluid. Would you add sour milk to the jug and then drink it. No me. I normally buy my Amsoil and filter and take it to Jiffy Lube. They still charge me to use the machine but normally not full price and I make them drop the pan and change filter. Truck runs like a charm.

Got this off the Amsoil site.
There has been a recent trend toward use of fluid evacuation systems in the
automatic transmission service industry in lieu of traditional transmission service
methods. These systems are used to pump the old fluid out of the transmission and
to refill with fresh fluid. This avoids dropping the pan and draining the unit which can
be time consuming and messy. The use of this method to replace the transmission
fluid is a clean, efficient, and safe way to remove hot oil from a transmission. The
problem, however, is that often times it is mistakenly thought that this represents
complete transmission service and that removal, and cleaning of the pan and
inspection and servicing of the filter are unnecessary.
Some people believe that all transmission filters are backflushed clean every time
the vehicle is turned off. This is a major misconception. Three-quarters of all
transmission filters today are not a simple screen, they are made of felt. A felt filter
CANNOT be backflushed. Felt holds dirt particles within tiny pores in the felt. It will
not wash out or flush out. If a felt filter becomes clogged it must be replaced.
Clogged filters restrict fluid flow, which lowers pressure to clutches and bands. This
can cause slippage and eventual burnout of the transmission.
Service manuals and textbooks on transmission service recommend that a
transmission filter be inspected and replaced, if necessary, as often as every 15,000
miles (24,140km), for severe service such as city driving, desert (hot dusty) driving,
extreme cold, frequent short trips, trailer towing, and delivery service. In normal
operating conditions the manuals recommend to inspect and replace the filter at
least every 30,000 miles (48,280km). Even the newer vehicles with 100,000 mile
(160,934km) drive train service warranties, the manufacturer recommends filter
replacement if the vehicle sees severe service conditions.
There have been an increasing number of instances surfacing recently regarding
transmission failures shortly after an evacuation service, without filter removal. At the
time of a fluid evacuation service, there is no way to know the condition of the filter
and how clogged it may be. The filters job is to collect and hold contaminants, (dirt,
metal filings, friction particles, etc.), and prevent these particles from causing
malfunction in such components as electronic force motors and solenoids. Today's
transmissions are far more susceptible to malfunctions caused by fine dirt
contamination. Without servicing the filter, there is no way to know if the filter is clean
of debris or nearing capacity. If the filter is nearing capacity, transmission failure may
not be far off. This is also a sign that there may be other internal problems in the
transmission. Recognizing these warning signs could eliminate major service later.
transmission. Recognizing these warning signs could eliminate major service later.
Most of the transmission failures after an evacuation service have occurred primarily
on relatively high mileage transmissions that have not been serviced in some time.
One reason for this is that the sludge and dirt buildup within the transmission will not
completely be removed during the service. When the new fluid (which has detergent
properties) is placed in the transmission, over days and weeks, the internal
components begin to wash the insides of the transmission.
This sludge does finally work loose and settles in the transmission filter, clogging it
up even further than it may have been before service. In these extreme cases, where
service has not been performed in some time, changing the filter may not completely
fix the problem. Some mechanics recommend a second service a few weeks after
the first, replacing the filter again, which may be partially clogged due to the cleaning
process in the transmission.
Even if the fluid evacuation method is desired to remove the used transmission fluid,
the pan should be removed also, and an inspection should be made of the pan
contents, fluid, and filter to determine the condition of the transmission. Aluminum
filings in the pan or iron filings on the pan magnet are signs of internal wear and may
give light to potential problems in the transmission. Transmission service is
performed for preventative maintenance. Evaluating the overall condition of the
transmission by removing the pan should be part of this preventative maintenance
also.
The Filter Manufacturers Council urges everyone to dispose of all used filters
properly.
 

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jbuchan said:
I use Amsoil ATF. It is compatible with Nissan J and will not, and CAN NOT void your warranty. Nissan can not make your use their ATF fluid. Amsoil ATF exceeds the Nissan J. Nissan would have to prove that the failure was caused by the Amsoil ATF. And if that was the case Amsoil would pay for the Transmissions. Nissan, like many other dealers try to scare you into buying their products. If you read carefully on your owners manual you will find the words " Suggested use".

I do a complete flush and filter change. Changing only 4 quarts at a time dilutes your good fresh fluid with bad dirty fluid. Would you add sour milk to the jug and then drink it. No me. I normally buy my Amsoil and filter and take it to Jiffy Lube. They still charge me to use the machine but normally not full price and I make them drop the pan and change filter. Truck runs like a charm.

Got this off the Amsoil site.
There has been a recent trend toward use of fluid evacuation systems in the
automatic transmission service industry in lieu of traditional transmission service
methods. These systems are used to pump the old fluid out of the transmission and
to refill with fresh fluid. This avoids dropping the pan and draining the unit which can
be time consuming and messy. The use of this method to replace the transmission
fluid is a clean, efficient, and safe way to remove hot oil from a transmission. The
problem, however, is that often times it is mistakenly thought that this represents
complete transmission service and that removal, and cleaning of the pan and
inspection and servicing of the filter are unnecessary.
Some people believe that all transmission filters are backflushed clean every time
the vehicle is turned off. This is a major misconception. Three-quarters of all
transmission filters today are not a simple screen, they are made of felt. A felt filter
CANNOT be backflushed. Felt holds dirt particles within tiny pores in the felt. It will
not wash out or flush out. If a felt filter becomes clogged it must be replaced.
Clogged filters restrict fluid flow, which lowers pressure to clutches and bands. This
can cause slippage and eventual burnout of the transmission.
Service manuals and textbooks on transmission service recommend that a
transmission filter be inspected and replaced, if necessary, as often as every 15,000
miles (24,140km), for severe service such as city driving, desert (hot dusty) driving,
extreme cold, frequent short trips, trailer towing, and delivery service. In normal
operating conditions the manuals recommend to inspect and replace the filter at
least every 30,000 miles (48,280km). Even the newer vehicles with 100,000 mile
(160,934km) drive train service warranties, the manufacturer recommends filter
replacement if the vehicle sees severe service conditions.
There have been an increasing number of instances surfacing recently regarding
transmission failures shortly after an evacuation service, without filter removal. At the
time of a fluid evacuation service, there is no way to know the condition of the filter
and how clogged it may be. The filters job is to collect and hold contaminants, (dirt,
metal filings, friction particles, etc.), and prevent these particles from causing
malfunction in such components as electronic force motors and solenoids. Today's
transmissions are far more susceptible to malfunctions caused by fine dirt
contamination. Without servicing the filter, there is no way to know if the filter is clean
of debris or nearing capacity. If the filter is nearing capacity, transmission failure may
not be far off. This is also a sign that there may be other internal problems in the
transmission. Recognizing these warning signs could eliminate major service later.
transmission. Recognizing these warning signs could eliminate major service later.
Most of the transmission failures after an evacuation service have occurred primarily
on relatively high mileage transmissions that have not been serviced in some time.
One reason for this is that the sludge and dirt buildup within the transmission will not
completely be removed during the service. When the new fluid (which has detergent
properties) is placed in the transmission, over days and weeks, the internal
components begin to wash the insides of the transmission.
This sludge does finally work loose and settles in the transmission filter, clogging it
up even further than it may have been before service. In these extreme cases, where
service has not been performed in some time, changing the filter may not completely
fix the problem. Some mechanics recommend a second service a few weeks after
the first, replacing the filter again, which may be partially clogged due to the cleaning
process in the transmission.
Even if the fluid evacuation method is desired to remove the used transmission fluid,
the pan should be removed also, and an inspection should be made of the pan
contents, fluid, and filter to determine the condition of the transmission. Aluminum
filings in the pan or iron filings on the pan magnet are signs of internal wear and may
give light to potential problems in the transmission. Transmission service is
performed for preventative maintenance. Evaluating the overall condition of the
transmission by removing the pan should be part of this preventative maintenance
also.
The Filter Manufacturers Council urges everyone to dispose of all used filters
properly.
I believe our tranny has a screen and not a filter, info posted in this thread, Post #3.

http://www.titantalk.com/forums/817526-post3.html

So I'm wondering what filter are you buying?
 

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Sorry I should have mentioned that. I am a proud Titan owner. I just bought my 04 Titan XE 42,000. I did the flush on my old Dodge and other vehicles and used the info from the Amsoil web site for viewer reading pleasure not for exact model info. But thanks that is good to know, filter not needed. But the screen can still be blocked and ATF fluid flow resticted if very dirty which is why I would still have them drop the pan.
 
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