Nissan Titan Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
805 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the other day when it was rainy, i decided to put my Titan in 4WD so i wouldnt slide off the road.
but i noticed that when i make turns, especially to the right, it feels like its fighting w me?....

is that a normal thing when its in 4WD and when making turns? i feel this resistance in the steering column.

or is it possesed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,032 Posts
I am pretty sure this is normal in most 4x4 vehicles. My Titan does the same thing, it makes a a rocking motion. My dads Avalanche does it as well. I have no reasoning behind it, I bet someone else will know.
:cheers:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Um, I believe you are going to bind up the front driveshaft if you keep doing this. The front driveshaft does not have a differential and, thus, the left and right wheels are forced to rotate at the same speed. When going around a turn, the turning radius is different for the two front wheels and thus they want to rotate at different speeds (inner wheel rotates less due to increased resistance from smaller turning radius). So, the mechanical 4WD system is forcing them rotate at the same speed, and the physics of turning is forcing them to rotate at different speeds. Ergo, your weird sensation in the steering column caused by these opposing forces.

Bottom line is our part time 4WD is for use only where there is going to be some wheel slippage such as in dirt, snow, ice or other slick surfaces. I don't think a wet road is slick enough unless your tires are really bad. If you want 4WD all the time, then you need to get a system with some type of center differential that permits different rotational speeds for the front wheels as well as the rear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,486 Posts
This is due to the drivetrain binding. Do *not* run in 4wd on pavement or hard-packed surfaces, this is a sure-fire way to damage the transfer-case and/or other drivetrain components. Part-time 4wd systems, like our Titans have, were never designed to be used this way. Full-time 4wd systems utilize a diff or viscous coupling in the transfer-case that allows the front and rear driveshafts to rotate at different speeds.

Part-time 4wd systems have no such mechanism, the front and rear driveshafts are locked together and rotate at the same speed. So when the vehicle makes a turn all 4 tires take a different path, which means they rotate at different speeds. At least they try to, and this is the fighting, hopping, and chirping you experience.

If you're not careful, you will break a u-joint, CV joint, or the transfer-case itself. Please read your manual on when you use 4wd.

4wd does not make it so you can drive faster in dangerous conditions. It doesn't make you stop faster and it doesn't mean you can take corners faster.

Drive safe for the conditions and use the vehicle and its parts as they were intended. Part-time 4wd is not to be used in the rain, on wet pavement, dry pavement, etc. Use it off-road in the dirt, mud, sand, snow, or ice all you want. Use it on snow- or ice-covered pavement all you want, just never when the tires are in direct contact with a hard surface (Rain-soaked pavement doesn't count as "covered" as the tires are making direct contact with the pavement).

Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,486 Posts
BayStateSuks said:
Um, I believe you are going to bind up the front driveshaft if you keep doing this. The front driveshaft does not have a differential and, thus, the left and right wheels are forced to rotate at the same speed. When going around a turn, the turning radius is different for the two front wheels and thus they want to rotate at different speeds (inner wheel rotates less due to increased resistance from smaller turning radius). So, the mechanical 4WD system is forcing them rotate at the same speed, and the physics of turning is forcing them to rotate at different speeds. Ergo, your weird sensation in the steering column caused by these opposing forces.
Close. The actual mechanics of 4wd are covered in my post above, but the issue isn't the inner and outer tires rotating at different speeds as they can do this just fine in 4wd since the front and rear axles have a differential. The binding occurs when the front and rear driveshafts need to rotate at different speeds but they can't due to being locked together. The energy built up by this binding is going to be released where there's the least resistance, usually between the tire and pavement. If you're unlucky enough, the tires will have enough grip that you'll break a ujoint or other driveline part instead of the tires chirping. Wherever the weakest link happens to be is where the built-up energy is going to be released.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,320 Posts
Quotes from your owners manual:

"4 wheels- for driving on rocky, sandy or snow-covered roads"

"When driving straight, shift the 4WD shift switch to the 2WD or 4H position. Do not move the 4WD shift switch when making a turn or reversing."

"Do not drive the vehicle in the 4H or 4LO position on dry hard surface roads. Driving on dry, hard surfaces in 4H or 4LO may cause unnecessary noise, tire wear and increased fuel consumption. If the 4WD warning light turns on when you are driving on dry hard surface roads:

–--in the 4H position, shift the 4WD shift switch to 2WD.

–--in the 4LO position, stop the vehicle, move the automatic transmission
shift selector lever to the N position with the brake pedal depressed, and
shift the 4WD shift switch to 2WD.

If the warning light is still on after the above operation, have your vehicle checked by a NISSAN dealer as soon as possible."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
805 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Holy crankshaft Batman!!!
thanks guys, guess im lucky i havent broken it....me bad.

but i could of sworn someone somewhere said to use 4WD in rainy conditions.
on more than one occasion i felt my rear end slide over a bit in the rain.
but from now on ill just be more carefull in 2WD when its raining...... :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
92,554 Posts
phugoid said:
Holy crankshaft Batman!!!
thanks guys, guess im lucky i havent broken it....me bad.

but i could of sworn someone somewhere said to use 4WD in rainy conditions.
on more than one occasion i felt my rear end slide over a bit in the rain.
but from now on ill just be more carefull in 2WD when its raining...... :)
Probably a Subaru driver.... :jester: Yeah, just slow down and be easier on the curves in the rain. If you're still sliding, buy better tires. Makes all the difference in the world.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I am having a problem with my 2006 nissan titan. When I come to a stop I get a clunk and when I initially hit the gas I get the same clunk anyone else get this????
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
92,554 Posts
guardurtitan said:
I am having a problem with my 2006 nissan titan. When I come to a stop I get a clunk and when I initially hit the gas I get the same clunk anyone else get this????
Yeah... You got a screw loose..... :upsidedow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
guardurtitan said:
I am having a problem with my 2006 nissan titan. When I come to a stop I get a clunk and when I initially hit the gas I get the same clunk anyone else get this????
Do you have the utility bed. If you do, then the cover over the floor channels slides and hits the front and the rear of the bed as you stop and go. No worry, just crank up the radio.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,557 Posts
I've driven plenty of times in heavy rain using 4WD....just don't use it on DRY pavement. The binding while turning is normal tire scrubbing between the fronts and rears because there's no center diff like on an AWD vehicle. I love using 4WD in the rain from a stop...in situations where you can't afford to sit and spin your tires pulling out. But I do usually switch back to 2WD shortly thereafter. And do so while going STRAIGHT.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top