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I'm not an expert but I'm guessing it is in part due to the much cooler (denser) air, thus requiring more fuel to maintain an optimum air/fuel ratio. Also the fact that all the fluids are likley thicker based upon the ambient temp until things warm up which in turn creates more drag upon moving parts. This hold true for just about any vehicle.
 

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Also consider the longer idle times to defrost the windows of ice/snow.
 

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And winter blended fuel.
 

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Wierd, mine isn't from any of that, but more of Throttling it more coming out of icey turns :D :D :D :D
 

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Wierd, mine isn't from any of that, but more of Throttling it more coming out of icey turns :D :D :D :D
Me too! Not to mention a remote start really kills it too.
 

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The winter blended fuel has little to do with it. In most cases at least here in Canada most of our fuel has 10% ethanol year round as an oxygenator. Most places have banned MTBE that was used for years as it as a carcinogen. Ethanol now replaces it year round.

In most cases the fuel system changes the blend to be fairly rich to help warm up the engine quick. This is even true without a car starter. Also using defrost sometimes used the AC to dry out the air for better defogging.

As for your air pressure swap over to Nitrogen and you will not have as much of a problem as it's much more stable in low temps.
 

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Yeah yeah, dirt trackin in the snow.
 

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As stated before, its the winter blend in the vast majority of the areas. Cold air does make for a better running engine but extremely cold teperatures can cause the opposite effect on the engine.
 

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The winter blended fuel has little to do with it. In most cases at least here in Canada most of our fuel has 10% ethanol year round as an oxygenator. Most places have banned MTBE that was used for years as it as a carcinogen. Ethanol now replaces it year round.

In most cases the fuel system changes the blend to be fairly rich to help warm up the engine quick. This is even true without a car starter. Also using defrost sometimes used the AC to dry out the air for better defogging.

As for your air pressure swap over to Nitrogen and you will not have as much of a problem as it's much more stable in low temps.
What?s the difference between summer-blend gasoline and winter-blend gasoline? - Ask.cars.com

The fuel does have an effect, although the cold temperature is more to blame.
 

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i also let mine run for a while in the mornings to warm up. thats just alot of waisted fuel:(
 

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When you drive with your foot on the floor everywhere you go like me its no different from summer to winter. Its only money......
 

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Rolling resistence is greater in winter also due to wet, snowy, icey roads. The cold, dense air also increases wind resistance costing mileage. Stuff I've learned driving tractor-trailer for 19 years. Imagine paying $4/gallon and getting 6-7 mpg over 140,000 miles a year.
 

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Rolling resistence is greater in winter also due to wet, snowy, icey roads. The cold, dense air also increases wind resistance costing mileage. Stuff I've learned driving tractor-trailer for 19 years. Imagine paying $4/gallon and getting 6-7 mpg over 140,000 miles a year.
WOW! 93,333$ in gas every year! (Unless my math is way off)

But yeah, my last couple of tanks have been worse and I have a few ideas:

1) Winter blend. We normally do not have ethanol in the gas during the summer here in East Texas. But we do now during the winters.

2) Maybe more dense air = more resistance (I really doubt this matters at all, but I can't prove that it doesn't) However, higher density outside air + cooler air = lower tire pressure. Check your tire to make sure you are properly inflated. Underinflation we all know can cause a drop in mileage.

3) and this may be a huge contributor, is that the torque converter takes a lot longer to lock up when it is cold = higher engine RPMs for a longer amount of time after startup. For example, I know that with me driving the same going to and from work, it takes at least 2 extra minutes in the winter before I can lock the TQ. That is on the highway, so an extra 4 miles per day of a 24 miles total commute is at 2100-2200 RPM instead of 1700 RPM.

4) I have no idea how the temperature changes the dynamics of the rubber in the tires, but it has to at least a little. Maybe this has some effect on fuel consumption?

5) I don't have to worry about this here at home, but I know from trips to Colorado that snow on the ground adds A LOT of resistance to the tires. I mean A LOT! For y'all up north that have to deal with snow, I would think this is the largest contributor to worse fuel mileage in the winter.

6) Anything I may not know about
 

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Actually his 6-7mpg is pretty good. My '08 Pete is getting about 4- 5 mpg for a yearly miles driven of around 125,000 miles driven and that's all with-in a 150 mile radius. I run around at just under the 80,000lbs legal limit all the time. I'm just glad i'm not the one buying the fuel.
 

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Winter blend fuel around here definitely has a negative hit on MPG's.
We get winter blend while the weather is still mild, and as soon as I put that in my Maxima, I was down 2-3 mpg just from the fuel switch alone. Then when the winter hits it's down another 1-2 mpg. In my Maxima that means I lose most mpgs from the fuel blend alone.
I just bought my Titan during winter, so far it gets 14 mpg mixed and 17 mpg mostly highway. Don't know if that'll get better in the summer....

I agree on all the other points too, colder air is denser (ECU will add a little more fuel to keep A/F at 14.7), vehicle takes longer to warm up/is idled longer, fluids are thicker, rolling resistance in rain and snow increases, etc.
 
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